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Old 07-04-2011, 03:09 PM
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Default What are the advantages of .357 SIG over .40 S&W?

My P226 is chambered for .40 S&W but could shoot .357 SIG by swapping the barrel.

.40 S&W seems perfect in the P226.
What are the advantages of .357 SIG?
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Old 07-04-2011, 04:01 PM
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If you reload bullets are cheaper.

It "should" feed more reliably.

If you like it fast, you can drive a light bullet quickly with the sig.

More muzzle blast with sig.

Those are what I can think of off the top of my head. I like the Sig and shoot it a lot out of my 229 sport.
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Old 07-04-2011, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Peter M. Eick View Post
If you reload bullets are cheaper.
But reloading the bottle-necked .357 SIG cartridge is harder than reloading the straight-walled .40 S&W.
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Old 07-04-2011, 04:48 PM
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I also have a P226 in 40S&W. Can't provide input on the .357 SIG, but I can tell you that 40S&W ammo is CHEAP right now.
I was curious about 357 SIG as well, but apparently it was a phase I was going thru and has since passed.... &^) H.
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Old 07-04-2011, 07:10 PM
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Why is reloading the bottleneck harder than a 40? I would have said the opposite.

The sig does not have an expander die like the 40. WIth Dillon carbide dies you just ram it through so you have one less die to adjust. I lube with hornady one shot because I use nickle cases but it is unneeded.
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Old 07-04-2011, 07:40 PM
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Bottleneck cartridges typically have to be trimmed now and then. Straightwall cartridges do not.
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Old 07-04-2011, 11:16 PM
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I've never loaded the .357s but hear they are a pain in the watusi due to the short neck.

I like some bottlenecks due to their history, such as the .32-20, .38-40, .44-40s, and even the .30 Mauser, and would like to get into the .25NAA, .32NAA or 9mm AE just for their uniqueness. But to me the .357 Sig has nothing to offer over the .40 S&W. They may be more reliable, but I've never had any kind of reliability issues with any of my .40s.

The main attributes to look for in a defensive cartridge is expansion and penetration and going to a lighter and smaller bullet is only a step backwards. If I were going to use it for hunting it might be a different story, but then I'd probably go with a nice revolver anyway.
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Old 07-05-2011, 07:07 AM
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I watched a guy load a full 15 round magazine with empty .357 Sig brass. He then inserted the mag and proceeded to pull back the slide fifteen times while empties fed into and then ejected with not a single jam. I would say the bottleneck cartridge has the least chance of feed related jamming of the two. Also, some of the loadings for .357 Sig make truth of the original concept of making an auto version of the .357 magnum. If the gun is made strong enough to handle it then it will reproduce some of the warmer 125 gr .357 magnum loadings just fine. The trouble lies in the fact that most of the guns chambered in .357 Sig weren’t originally designed for that much recoil. So some of the guns started to eat their frames.

BUT…

With modern bullets and powders there are plenty of 9mm, .40SW, and .45ACP loadings that are testing in ballistics gelatin tests that have penetration and “wound cavity” channels very similar to the 125gr .357 magnum when viewed side by side. So the .357Sig may be doomed if only by a why bother kind of attitude. That is why I think its biggest benefit may be the ease of feeding from a magazine. It does need a proper bullet selection though as not just any 9mm bullet will seat correctly on the short neck.

Oh, and I find the Lee Bottle Neck .357Sig Factory Crimp Die finishes off the loading of this ammo to near perfection.
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Old 07-05-2011, 08:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bushmaster1313 View Post
My P226 is chambered for .40 S&W but could shoot .357 SIG by swapping the barrel.

.40 S&W seems perfect in the P226.
What are the advantages of .357 SIG?

IMHO...... NONE, ZERO, ZILCH... I have limited experience with the rounds, purchased a 357sig, ported barrel for my M&P40.... could find nothing of value after shooting 100 rounds other than a big flame show at the end of my slide.. Loud bang, hard to control muzzle flip, a pain in the butt to load the magazine, ammo was more expensive and harder to find.
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Old 07-05-2011, 10:22 AM
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The 357SIG is another caliber option. Shooters either like it or hate it. To some it is the end all, to others it is not needed. In addition to the reliable feeding the others have mentioned, the 357SIG round is extremely accurate, flat shooting, and holds its velocity/accuracy with distance. It really shines in barrier penetration. Though not as powerful as the 357 magnum 125gr SJHP, the ballistic gel profile is similar. Recoil wise the actual impulse is less than a 40 S&W. Felt recoil is subjective and highly influenced by the platform. I think some shooters think "357 magnum here comes the recoil" when shooting 357SIG. The actual measured recoil impulse of 357SIG is slightly less than 40. I shoot a lot of both calibers and find the 40 has a tendency to rise and twist. The 357SIG recoil impulse is more straight back and quick. With proper recoil management and practice you can get back on target quickly and shoot the 357SIG fast. This is my observations with working long term with the caliber. Effect wise all of the recognized combat calibers work or fail about the same. The 357SIG has gained an enviable street record in actual shootings. Bill
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Old 07-05-2011, 10:35 AM
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Seems like a solution to a non problem. But, you get to spent a lot more money when you can find it.
A number of local shooters have purchased a sig barrel for their M&P, Sig 229 and then at a local match find out that they have .40 ammo for their gun with a .357 Sig barrel on it, and vice versa. Major problem there...
Randy

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Old 07-05-2011, 11:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by growr View Post
Seems like a solution to a non problem. But, you get to spent a lot more money when you can find it.
Randy
You can say that about any defensive auto cartridge that's not a 9mm. Some of us just like to be different. If we were all practical, the only rounds we'd need are .22 LR, 9mm, .38, .357, .223, .30-06, .30-30, and .338 Mag.
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Old 07-05-2011, 12:27 PM
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One advantage I saw: during the Dark Ages (you know, about 2 years ago when ammo shelves were bare) 2 boxes of .357 continually sat on the Wally World shelf. They had more in back. There isn't a high demand for it, so in a pinch it would be a nice option to fall back on.
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Old 07-05-2011, 12:51 PM
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As mentioned by The Sarge, the .357 Sig is extremely accurate and flat-shooting...I've made 250 yard hits with a G33 with minimal "hold-over". I prefer the .357 Sig cartridge over the .40 S&W by a large margin.

I do admit that .357 Sig is usually more expensive than .40, but that's why I like having both barrels...practice a lot with .40, finish up with a couple mags of .357 Sig, and then carry the .357 Sig for CCW. Works very much like .38 Spl/.357 Mag.

Tim
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Old 07-05-2011, 05:09 PM
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I shot 800 rounds out of my 229 sport today and it was fun. The 357sig has a big bark at the range and it was definately the big dog on the line today. It was accurate, easy to shoot and easier to reload. The only problem was fatigue. 800 rounds of full power SIG is work to shoot.

I did it becasue I wanted to get my 229 sport past 10,000 rounds. I have now fired 10,050 rounds out of it over the past decade. Great gun, easy round to load and come to think of it, this gun has never seen a factory round ever.
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Old 07-05-2011, 06:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turbo38gn View Post
IMHO...... NONE, ZERO, ZILCH... I have limited experience with the rounds, purchased a 357sig, ported barrel for my M&P40.... could find nothing of value after shooting 100 rounds other than a big flame show at the end of my slide.. Loud bang, hard to control muzzle flip, a pain in the butt to load the magazine, ammo was more expensive and harder to find.
I agree. At one time I was on a .357 Sig craze. I had a Beretta 96 with a .357 Sig barrel, a Sig 229, a Glock 32, and a Glock 35 with a .357 Sig ported barrel. I don't have any of them now.
The .357 is very loud and has, IMO, excessive muzzle blast. While is does shoot flat, I don't have the need for a handgun that shoots out to 200 yards; anything beyond 100 yards is rifle/carbine range for me.
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Old 07-07-2011, 03:17 PM
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Quote:
In addition to the reliable feeding the others have mentioned, the 357SIG round is extremely accurate, flat shooting, and holds its velocity/accuracy with distance. It really shines in barrier penetration.
That covers most of it to me. I bought a long slide Glock 35 in .40 S&W. I put a few hundred rounds through it. Then I had Jarvis fit one of his custom .357 SIG barrels to it. I keep the .40 S&W barrel in the bag "just in case" but I use the .357 SIG barrel _at least_ 10-1 over the .40 S&W. Some of that is just "nice to be different" since it seems like 90% of the LEO's in the world carry the .40.

My normal CCW is a .44 Special revolver. (S&W M296 Airweight) But I have a bug out bag with the Glock 35 and the two barrels in it. Whole bunch of Glock 31 mags loaded up with the Speer Gold Dot load (the one the Air Marshal's use). I still haven't shot a deer with that cartridge but everything else I've used it on was very impressed. I've got my .44 snub for up close and personal. If I'm going somewhere far away or at night, I throw the bag with the Glock in the vehicle. Then I can engage targets much further out there. And I've got a whole lot more repeat shots.

I don't discount that higher degree of penetration at all. If the good guy in the Tyler, TX shooting had had my Glock in .357 SIG, his bullets would have gone through the bad guy's ballistic vests. The bad guy would be dead instead of the good guy. Same thing for somebody trying to use a vehicle for cover. I live in a very, very sparsely populated rural area. If you get in trouble out on a dirt road somewhere, you are on your own. If the bad guys are blocking you in with pickups, you just might need some real penetration. Or a longer effective range than a typical CCW gun.

I do reload .357 SIG. I should try those Dillon dies but they are expensive. Right now I'm using a combination of .357 SIG and .40 S&W dies. That way I can size the base using the .40 S&W dies (carbide) and not need to lube that part. Just need a little bit of lube on the necks for the .357 SIG die. The whole process does end up being multiple steps so it does take a lot more time than 9mm or .45 ACP. But I really enjoy the round so I'm not going to complain about that.

Somebody already mentioned how the .357 SIG has been quite effective in real life shootings. More than you would expect if you just look at the lab results. My experience has been the same. I used to shoot a lot of medium size vermin with a .357 Magnum revolver with 125 grain JHP's and it was deadly. Guess I shouldn't be surprised that .357 SIG and Gold Dots gives me the same basic results.

Agree the round has a heck of a muzzle blast. Standing off to the side at 90 degrees to the muzzle will hammer you even when you are wearing muffs. You can feel the physical push on your ear drum. I was shooting with a buddy who was switching back and forth between 9mm and .357 SIG. I was wearing high quality ear plugs and was off to his left. I could tell immediately which cartridge was being fired just from the "rap" of the blast wave from the SIG. It would be overwhelming in a tight and enclosed area. If you fired one in a closed up car, you might end up with blood coming out of your ears! I keep wondering what it will be like if one of those Air Marshals has to fire a few rounds inside a plane....

Oh, and I paid the big bucks to have a custom DI AR-15 made up to shoot .357 SIG. Using a LW lower and using my Glock mags. Heck of a fun little firearm. I had it made up by Ron Williams as a pistol so that I could turn it into a SBR. Just haven't gotten around to the paperwork yet. If I was an LEO and could carry a .357 SIG, I would want that little rifle to be in my trunk.

Gregg
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Old 03-26-2013, 03:16 PM
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Been a .40 advocate since the early 90's when our department issued the Glock 22. I LOVE it! But the first time I fired a .357Sig I said I have got to get me one of these. It is a nice option to have both. I will not give up either one. But if I could only choose one, it would have to be the .40 because of availibility of ammo in my local. I suggest getting the extra, barrel it is cheaper than an extra gun...and you will enjoy it
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Old 03-26-2013, 03:44 PM
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I doubt if whatever is on the receiving end of either is gonna notice the difference..
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Old 03-26-2013, 04:25 PM
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Began my career back in the early 70's when we carried 38 spl's & 357 magnums....retired in 08....was an officer/instructor/SWAT operator/armorer during that career....was in on the ground floor after 9-11 when several large federal agencies adopted the Sig 229 in 357 sig.
I have a lot of experience with the rd in both the Sig and Glock platforms. The round was designed from the ground up to emulate the 125 gr 357 magnum round in a compact pistol round. This it does admirably.
The traits that you attribute to it; muzzle blast, recoil , etc. were all factors in training officers to shoot it, particularly those who had never fired a handgun previously. We had the same issues with 357 magnum revolvers when issuing and training with them in the 70's and 80's.
The 357 sig is a great cartridge and has proven itself very well in the L.E. arena....as far as reloading...I have reloaded thousands of 357 sig's and never encountered any problems any different than non bottle necked rounds.
I have several Sig's and Glock's that I have replaced the 40 S&W barrels with the 357 sig barrels.....I was always a 357 magnum fan and still am and now I have high cap auto pistols that will deliver the same ballistic performance with 125 gr. bullets....doesn't get any better in my book.

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Old 04-19-2013, 12:01 PM
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The 357 Sig was an answer to a question nobody asked. As Chuck Taylor (I believe) said, "I never knew anyone who was ever in a gunfight who wished he had a smaller bullet." The 40 S&W works just fine. The 357 Sig was a marketing effort, designed to piggy-back on the mystique of the 357 Magnum revolver cartridge. There is NOTHING to indicate that the 357 Sig is any more effective than the 40. Yeah, yeah, there will be the "I heard about a guy who..." stories of Herculean "stopping power" of any particular round being discussed, but the bottom line is a fast and accurate shooter will always win the day...regardless of the ammo. Anyone want to face down one of my Navy SEAL friends who are carrying simple 9MM target ammo? Train and practice.
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Old 04-19-2013, 12:23 PM
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I had a SIG P226 in .357 sig it was a sweet gun and very accruate. I always thought of the .357 Sig as a 9mm Magnum.
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Old 04-19-2013, 12:42 PM
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I asked this same question (of myself) a few years ago before a pistol purchase.

In my 40 cal USP, I shoot 135 grain (.40 caliber) bullets @ just over 1300 fps. I couldn't (and don't) understand how the Sig betters (or even equals with the .36 caliber bullet) this performance ballistically ----- I bought another .40.
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Old 04-19-2013, 06:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johncaileSDItraining View Post
The 357 Sig was an answer to a question nobody asked. As Chuck Taylor (I believe) said, "I never knew anyone who was ever in a gunfight who wished he had a smaller bullet." The 40 S&W works just fine. The 357 Sig was a marketing effort, designed to piggy-back on the mystique of the 357 Magnum revolver cartridge. There is NOTHING to indicate that the 357 Sig is any more effective than the 40. Yeah, yeah, there will be the "I heard about a guy who..." stories of Herculean "stopping power" of any particular round being discussed, but the bottom line is a fast and accurate shooter will always win the day...regardless of the ammo. Anyone want to face down one of my Navy SEAL friends who are carrying simple 9MM target ammo? Train and practice.
Ask one of your SEAL buddies if they would prefer a better stopper. Bet they wouldn't mind. Shot placement trumps anything but I was trained by many folks including a former SEAL and all exposed the following advice and I am paraphrasing, " carry the heaviest caliber you can accurately fire ". Nuff said.
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Old 04-20-2013, 08:56 AM
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When someone offered me a Sig 226 in 357sig, I was hesitant. I went on LEO.com and read the reviews by those who put their lives on the line. Overwhelming statements strongly in favor of the sig357. I then PM Massad Ayoob and asked for his opinion. Again strong endorsement. Never looked back. I made the deal and gotta admit I like it. EZ to reload if you pay attention and use the right bullets and care. Great penetration accurate.

I like it so much, I sold my 40.
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Old 04-20-2013, 10:34 AM
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I have carried a SIG P229 for years and dispatched plenty of Deer and even a Moose with it...I have the .40 cal barrels for both of my personal 229/226 and the 155 grain is also a good round....165 is almost as good and the 180 is a round I would never carry on duty. I have fired thousands of 125 grain Gold Dots through my guns at all kinds of targets, windshields, car bodies and animals.....and never a failure of any kind. A fellow trainer who hunts with his Sig feels the Remington Golden Saber does a slightly better job on the Deer he kills. I have complete confidence that whatever I may face the .357 Sig will do the job and then some
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Old 04-20-2013, 10:49 AM
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As previously mentioned in post #20 I have been carrying/shooting/instructing firearms professionally for 40 years....and I try not to get embroiled in "debates" about calibers or cartridges.....Shot placement is king.....and to me, various platforms and loadings are simply "tools in the tool box".....as an instructor I have instructed officer's with the 38spl,357mag,9mm,40 S&W,45 acp,10mm and the 357 sig....some of these posed particular issues & challenges when training officers, but they all serve their purpose and a lot of folks have their own opinions about what they prefer and for what reasons and that is great. They should embrace their choice of platform, loading and develop skill sets and learn to use their "tools" of choice to their optimum level.

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Old 04-20-2013, 11:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M1911-66 View Post
But reloading the bottle-necked .357 SIG cartridge is harder than reloading the straight-walled .40 S&W.
Reloading the .357 SIG is no "harder" than reloading any rifle round. The difference between reloading the .357 and a straight-walled case is the SIG requires lubing, which is an annoyance to me when doing any large quantity of reloading. It's actually easier as it only requires two dies, not the typical 3 or 4 that straight-walled cases do.

As for the short neck, the only problem inherrent with it is it can be more prone to "setback" if one decides to rechamber repeatedly.
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Old 04-20-2013, 12:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bushmaster1313 View Post
My P226 is chambered for .40 S&W but could shoot .357 SIG by swapping the barrel.

.40 S&W seems perfect in the P226.
What are the advantages of .357 SIG?
The .357 SIG has its supporters, but with all due respect, I will make the opposite case and say that it has no advantages and some disadvantages.

This cartridge is essentially a 9mm (.355, not .357) bullet in a necked down .40 S&W case going at 9mm +P+ velocities. One advantage, therefore, is that it allows a private citizen who does not have access to 9mm +P+ (arguably the best stopper in the 9mm field, although that could even be argued these days - it certainly was true at the time this SIG cartridge was introduced) in an over-the-counter, consumer-available-without-restriction cartridge. The round is also very accurate. That, unfortunately, is the end of the good news.

SIG, which has a relatively narrow line of guns aimed mostly at agency and officer sales, with the attendant commercial hangers-on that always come with LE contracts, wanted a cartridge bearing its name. Essentially, they wanted a "coup" like S&W had achieved with the .40 S&W. The .40 S&W recreated the FBI 10mm Auto ballistics developed after their search for the "ideal" cartridge following the infamous Miami shootout, but in a shorter case. Thus, the .40 S&W achieved the desired ballistics in a case length that could fit into the envelope of a 9mm sized pistol, which was needed because of the increasing numbers of officers with smaller hands.

At the time, following the Miami shootout, however, the term "9mm" had an ineffective connotation, and agencies were leaving that round in droves. On the other hand, the new cartridge which SIG hoped would take over the LE market had to take advantage of existing technology and fit into existing platforms to keep development costs at a minimum, hence the use of the .40 S&W case and the 9mm bullet.

The name selected for the cartridge is a piece of marketing genius, if not a jab at weapons committees and police administrators, who were duped into thinking they were getting real .357 Magnum revolver ballistics in a .40 caliber pistol. Recall that the last revolver round regarded as devastatingly effective (as opposed to merely adequate) used by LE prior to the en masse switch to semi-auto pistols was the .357 Magnum 125 grain JHP at 1,400 to 1,450 fps. The .357 SIG falls short of this goal and instead performs more like a .357 Magnum in a snub or a hotly loaded 38 Special in a 6 inch barrel.

In fact, with a more effective bullet, the .38/44 of 1929/1930 will do the same job as the .357 SIG, albeit with less rounds on tap and in a larger weapon. For that matter, a properly set up 38 Super is also capable of the same ballistics, as is the .356 TSW (there's that S&W name on a cartridge again) and 9 x 23 Winchester. There are perhaps others as well. SIG had to have a cartridge that would fit into a short action like a 9mm length of cycle or envelope, as opposed to a long action like a .45 ACP/38 Super envelope in order to fit a wider variety of hands. Plus, S&W and Winchester had already done the homework on the .40 S&W case.

The fact that the .40 S&W already did the same job ballistically was not the point. Marketing for SIG was the point. That is fine, I suppose, as long as everyone understands it for what it is.

In actual fact, the .357 SIG did not really catch on, and only a handful of agencies actually use the cartridge. It is frightfully expensive, much more so than the 9mm +P+, making consumers turn up their noses. Those who have to have one because it is used by the Texas Rangers, Secret Service, etc., get one, but must also have a Texas sized bank account or oil rig to feed the weapon. Agencies contract for ammo and compared to hobbyists, most officers shoot surprisingly little.

So, in its favor, the SIG cartridge has accuracy and 9mm +P+ ballistics, for those who cannot find 9mm +P+ ammo.

Against it is prohibitively high cost for the consumer (agencies take note as you are spending OUR money). This may not be important as it seems many gun owners seem not to shoot much. Or, a box or two a year is deemed "shooting alot" by these folks. Also against the SIG cartridge is high chamber pressures, which makes it punishing for the pistols which chamber the round. It is so hard on the weapons that when Homeland Security announced winners in its huge weapons contract a few years ago, SIG's own pistol could not stand up to the pounding over the length of the test and was not approved in that caliber. HK, which got approved in all calibers, was the only pistol approved in the .357 SIG cartridge.

If your goal is to just try it out, by all means, have at it. If, on the other hand you believe it will give you something not available in .40 S&W, then pass. What you will get is 9mm +P+ ballistics but at a greatly enhanced cost, less rounds in the magazine than 9mm in the same size magazine and your pistol will sustain a pounding that most cannot take over the long haul.

Compare:

125 grain .357 SIG at 1,350 fps
115 grain 9mm +P+ at 1,300 fps
127 grain 9mm +P+ at 1,250 fps

These are, for all practical purposes, the same and I doubt any criminal hit with any of these could tell the difference. Thus, for less cost for practice ammo and greater magazine capacity including less wear and tear to the weapon, I would choose a 9mm over the .357 SIG. I would still choose a .45 or .40 S&W before either the 9mm or .357 SIG, however.

I have also posted a picture comparing bullet performance which I saw in another thread and which pretty well tells the story of the .357 SIG versus 9mm:
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  #30  
Old 04-20-2013, 12:57 PM
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Nice write up.

I will counter that simply put as a reloader, the 357SIG is cheaper to reload and shoot. 9mm bullets tend to be cheaper than 10mm bullets. Particularly the 9mm in 124 and 125 grn JHP's tend to be significantly cheaper than the 40 135 grn JHP's.

So the Sig is cheaper to load and shoot and more accurate in general.

My view is that if I am going to spend money on a 10mm bullet, I tend to toss them from a true 10mm instead of the 10mm Kurtz.
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Old 04-20-2013, 01:14 PM
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I feel the .357 Sig is a better cartridge for Highway Patrol, due to the accuracy at longer ranges, and penetration aspects. And yes, they feed very reliably.

I also believe in the psychological aspect. The .357 Sig is a big boomer, and I honestly feel that causes more of a mental knock-down with a certain percentage of perps. Kind of like a flash-bang grenade stunning someone.
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Old 04-20-2013, 11:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shawn mccarver View Post
Recall that the last revolver round regarded as devastatingly effective (as opposed to merely adequate) used by LE prior to the en masse switch to semi-auto pistols was the .357 Magnum 125 grain JHP at 1,400 to 1,450 fps. The .357 SIG falls short of this goal and instead performs more like a .357 Magnum in a snub or a hotly loaded 38 Special in a 6 inch barrel.

Compare:

125 grain .357 SIG at 1,350 fps
115 grain 9mm +P+ at 1,300 fps
127 grain 9mm +P+ at 1,250 fps

These are, for all practical purposes, the same and I doubt any criminal hit with any of these could tell the difference.
You're saying the 125 gr. .357 Magnum, at 1400-1450 FPS, is vastly superior to the 125 gr. .357 Sig, which you later quote at 1350 FPS, a difference of 50-100 FPS, or roughly 3.75-7.4 percent...however, the 127 gr, 9mm +P+ at 1250 FPS is "for all practical purposes, the same", even though the .357 Sig load is 100 FPS faster, or roughly 8 percent? So...an 8 percent superiority of the .357 Sig over the 9mm +P+ renders them essentially "the same", but the .357 Magnum managing a 3.75-7.4 percent superiority over the .357 Sig is "devastatingly effective", and therefore the .357 Sig "falls short"? I see.

I'm not saying the .357 Sig is the end-all be-all. It ain't. It's yet another compromise, as are all handgun cartridges, in an attempt to balance portability, shoot-ability, accuracy, capacity, and terminal effect. Not many here, I believe, have intended to advance the .357 Sig as vastly superior to the .40 S&W, or necessarily any other cartridge. Most of us who like the .357 Sig happen to like its penetration, and particularly (for me, at least) appreciate its flat trajectory, which makes longer range hits a bit less difficult.

Yes, I acknowledge that those shooters buying their .357 Sig ammo "off-the-shelf" are going to pay a premium over .40 S&W. Part of that extra cost is derived from the lower demand for the .357 Sig, therefore shorter manufacturing "runs", which drives unit cost up. And that higher cost keeps the demand low. Pretty similar story to the 10mm (another favorite of mine). It's a catch-22. So, personally...I'd love to give the .357 Sig (and the 10mm!) a boost to increase popularity, and drive down the cost...which in turn should increase the popularity!

It always seems to boil down to "my bullet is better than your bullet"! Yeah, and my Father can whip your Dad's butt, too!

Tim

Last edited by Bullzaye; 04-21-2013 at 08:47 PM. Reason: Eliminate redundant statement
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Old 04-21-2013, 01:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peakes View Post
I doubt if whatever is on the receiving end of either is gonna notice the difference..

Victim: Bang! Bang! Bang!


Attacker: "You shot me with just a Sig? I'm glad you didn't use a .40..... Ha Ha Ha."


I myself believe the above to be an unlikely scenario.
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Old 04-21-2013, 01:54 AM
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.357 SIG, like a lot of high velocity cartridges, loses a lot out of short barrels. Out of a barrel less than 4" you might as well just go with a 9mm+P. It really shines out of longer barrels but hardly anyone takes advantage of that, say with a Glock 35 with a .357 SIG barrel.

I would tend to agree with the previous poster that the round was mostly marketing since there was no expressed need for the cartridge. At least the .40 S&W was for a niche that the FBI created --- although with better bullets these days you're getting the same levels of performance from a 9mm as you would from a .40 S&W JHP bought in 1990. It's funny that so many LE agencies are coming back to the 100+ year old 9mm for the same reasons they went whole hog in the 70s and 80s: more ammo on deck, less recoil, very manageable in a full sized gun.
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Old 04-21-2013, 02:15 AM
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I can't wait to try my .357 SIG barrel out but its soooo hard to find way harder then 9mm but for a round it seems like a pretty good SD round
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Old 04-21-2013, 07:22 AM
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Based on articles when the 357 SIG was new, it was intended to give .357 Magnum Revolver performance in a semi-auto pistol.
In a few states, DoT and Highway Patrol officers were issued the SIG because of superior car penetration vs. the .40 S&W. The trajectory advantage is questionable at pistol ranges.
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Who is primarily interested in point personal defense, not police work.
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Old 04-21-2013, 08:00 AM
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A couple of weeks ago, I took my G32, 357 SIG to my cousins homemde range..He is a gun enthusist, works in high level security..His carry pistol is a 40 cal G22..
He had never seen or shot a 357 SIG round..He is a believer now in that round..We tore up some of his steel targets, using 125 fmj at 100 yds, where the 165 fmj 40 cal did not put a dent in the target...
He told me to leave it at home, or shoot paper targets, not his steel ones...He was laughing when he said it...
BTW, I have 2 Glocks in 40 cal, a G22 and a G23 and a KelTec sub 2k that shoots 40...Not a thing wrong with this rd...But I sure do like that 357 Sig...
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Old 04-22-2013, 06:52 AM
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I wonder what kind of performance could be achieved with a 357 SIG carbine?
Are there any LOCKED BREECH 10mm carbines out there in the wild?
Geoff
Who does not like blow back carbines.
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  #39  
Old 04-26-2013, 12:00 PM
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I just got a Sig P239 in 357 Sig. I love it. This will be a BUG and for when I'm not in uniform.

I hate the snappiness of the .40, especially out of my duty gun, a Glock 22. I hate Glocks too.

I researched the round quite a bit before purchasing the Sig 239. Awesome ballistics all around. Excellent street performance too.

I recently read, though I can't find the article, that one state patrol agency on the east coast has had one shot stops since they've adopted it.
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Old 05-15-2013, 12:24 AM
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For those that might have been looking for them for a while, I just picked up both the 9mm and 357 sig barrels at Midway USA last week. About $70 each. Now to find a 9mm magazine or two.
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Old 05-19-2013, 10:52 AM
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If I were still a police officer, I would carry a 357 Sig forever. Flat shooting and accurate. I was put onto the caliber by a former fellow officer. He had a M&Pc. I found a NIB M&P FS with nite sites in February for $419 plus tax FROM A DEALER at the Frisco gun show. Reload to reduce flash. Midway has dies (9mm for body sizing, 357 Sig dies for neck and shoulder, Factory Crimp die for finishing in my progressive- no lube needed.), Starline has brass. 9mm bullets are around (Don't use Golden Saber, plated, or lead). Use Ramshot Silhouette powder. Silhouette powder gives velocity (1350 fps w/125 gr Speer hp). No pressure signs and almost zero flash signature indoors. I got a 40 S&W barrel from midway for $93 and a 17lb ISMI recoil spring. Comfortable to shoot.
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Old 05-19-2013, 11:09 AM
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I have a rheaded barrel for my Glock 32 and shoot it with a YHM Cobra can. Wow, what a rush!! I just love those 9mm/.40 ballistics!
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Old 05-19-2013, 12:20 PM
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I have a SIG P226 in .40 and added a .357 barrel. I like both. My big problem is loading for the .357 bottleneck case. I can't get the neck sized down enough to get a tight enough grip on the bullet. I am using Lee dies and the factory crimp die. This is one of my projects on my projects list since I retired.
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