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Old 02-18-2011, 03:21 AM
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Default EDC Gun Choice

I know a lot of folks highly respect Jeff Quinn's reviews at Gunblast. Here is a guy who has fired everything and has access to any gun he wants, yet it is interesting to note that his choice for an EDC gun is the lowly little 11 oz M342 J-frame (carried in his pocket!) and loaded with Glaser Safety Slugs (oh my!), for almost a decade now.

Maybe some wisdom to be gleaned, there???

Smith & Wesson 342PD Titanium Centennial .38 Special +P

Smith & Wesson 340 M&P Lightweight Centennial .357 Magnum Revolver

Ruger LCR .38 Special Pocket Revolver Update

Last edited by off road; 02-18-2011 at 03:23 AM.
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Old 02-18-2011, 05:58 AM
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That's his choice, and works for him.

We each have to find what works for us. In my case it's a 5" 1911 or a P35 with a J-Frame or Glock 26 as a BUG.

Biker
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Old 02-18-2011, 06:09 AM
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Not everyone settles on one piece and that's that. I have different guns I carry depending on what I'm wearing and what I'm doing. Sometimes it's a j-frame, sometimes it's a Kel-tec .380, sometimes an L-frame .357, most of the time it's a CCO size 1911.
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Old 02-18-2011, 08:34 AM
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My point is to suggest to newbs that they don't need to start out with a bazooka. I started out buying larger frame/higher capacity handguns, that are great fun at the range but lack any practical application for a civilian. Many thousands of $$$ later, they just sit in my safe 99% of the time.

Lots and lots of excellent pocket pistols (eg J-frames), sub-compacts (eg Glock 27), and compacts (eg Glock 23) out there, these days! There is also a big revolution in handgun ammunition, like Hornaday Critical Defense, that is specifically engineered for short barreled weapons. There is now no ballistic downside to going with something light and compact vs some huge heavy slab of steel....if you choose the right ammunition.

I know when I was a kid, everybody warned us against carrying a "snubby" revolver. The reason was the technologically poor ammunition available (eg 158 gr LSWC's). No doubt, sage advice back then! But hell....now you can shoot screaming "shock and awe" 125 gr .357's, from a little scandium alloy J-frame.

Last edited by off road; 02-18-2011 at 08:43 AM.
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Old 02-18-2011, 10:43 AM
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I live way the hell out in the boonies, so I don't have to wear a gun all the time. When I do go to certain places in town I carry the only S&W that I kept when I thinned out the accumulation, a 65 4" .357 in an Alessi belt slide. After a while I don't even notice that I have it on. If I did have to carry all my waking hours, it would still be the .357 in the Alessi. Hides well and very easy to draw from.
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Old 02-18-2011, 10:55 AM
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Jeff could probably shoot the legs of a gnat with a J frame. Newbs to shooting should start with guns that they can actually shoot. If you can shoot and reload a J acceptably under stress, then go for it. If you can't, don't think it's still a good choice b/c this or that gun celebrity carries it.
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Old 02-18-2011, 12:17 PM
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Quote:
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Newbs to shooting should start with guns that they can actually shoot. If you can shoot and reload a J acceptably under stress, then go for it. If you can't, don't think it's still a good choice b/c this or that gun celebrity carries it.
I have to agree with this article:

http://www.keepandbeararms.com/Puckett/firstgun.pdf
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Old 02-18-2011, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by off road View Post
My point is to suggest to newbs that they don't need to start out with a bazooka.
That's funny, and true.

One thing I know, a person should ~be honest~ and pick a gun they will actually carry every time they put their pants on.
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Old 02-18-2011, 12:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by off road View Post
I have to agree with this article:

http://www.keepandbeararms.com/Puckett/firstgun.pdf

That's some practical advice. I don't agree with him 100%, but it's worth the read.
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Old 02-18-2011, 12:47 PM
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A few years ago, I read Jeff’s opinion that the average citizen concealed carrying has to compromise when it comes to lugging heavy handguns as opposed to light/air weight handguns. His reasoning was that since we carry far more than actually using our handguns in self defense situations, a compromise has to be reached by each individual. I have to agree with him.

I’m not an “operator” or a LEO, but the 340PD works just fine for me as a primary CC weapon; and at times, for a BUG.

Of all of the handguns that I own, there are only three that I use for CC; and the 340PD is one of ‘em…
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Old 02-18-2011, 01:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nimble, Jack B. View Post
A few years ago, I read Jeff’s opinion that the average citizen concealed carrying has to compromise when it comes to lugging heavy handguns as opposed to light/air weight handguns. His reasoning was that since we carry far more than actually using our handguns in self defense situations, a compromise has to be reached by each individual. I have to agree with him.

I’m not an “operator” or a LEO, but the 340PD works just fine for me as a primary CC weapon; and at times, for a BUG.

Of all of the handguns that I own, there are only three that I use for CC; and the 340PD is one of ‘em…
I fully concur. My EDC is either my M&P340 or my 340PD.
Shoot well and carry safe......
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Old 02-19-2011, 02:49 AM
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Since I got my carry permit I've just always grabbed my 4506-1,the smallest I've stuffed in my pants so far is a Glock 33,right now I'm trying my new-to-me used Sig P226.

Honestly? I like the full sized pistols over any mini whatever,but that's just me.
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Old 02-19-2011, 06:41 AM
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I have a Night Guard on my bed table and it contains Glasers. Do not underestimate the effectiveness of those rounds. I do not, however, carry Glasers on the street. The very thing that causes them to be great home defense rounds is a distinct liability against the kind of winter clothing we see up here.

I CCW a Colt Commander with copper plated flat tips at 225 gr. They are every bit as effective as any HP round; however, they do not lose appreciable weight under virtually any test.

Last edited by J.P.60; 02-19-2011 at 06:44 AM.
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Old 02-19-2011, 10:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by off road View Post
My point is to suggest to newbs that they don't need to start out with a bazooka........ <snip>
But on the other end of the spectrum, we shouldn't necessarily be steering these folks towards the tiny, diminutive micro-mouse-guns either. Guns the size of an LCP or P3AT, for example, are specialty guns made for a specialized purpose. Their physical size, extremely short sight radius, and high power to weight ratio not only make them hard to train adequately with, but also makes them difficult to fight with, which is what we MUST be able to do with any defensive gun.

For the vast majority of people, the ideal EDC is going to fall somewhere between "hog leg" and "mouse gun".
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Old 02-19-2011, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by cshoff View Post
But on the other end of the spectrum, we shouldn't necessarily be steering these folks towards the tiny, diminutive micro-mouse-guns either. Guns the size of an LCP or P3AT, for example, are specialty guns made for a specialized purpose. Their physical size, extremely short sight radius, and high power to weight ratio not only make them hard to train adequately with, but also makes them difficult to fight with, which is what we MUST be able to do with any defensive gun.

For the vast majority of people, the ideal EDC is going to fall somewhere between "hog leg" and "mouse gun".
We don't live in a perfect world! These days, I am recommending the Ruger .357 LCR for the average Joe. Supreb recoil absorbing grips (when oh when will S&W learn this lesson???), excellent trigger pull, and 17 oz for at least some recoil absorption. Light, compact, and packable. Load Glasers in the house, and Hornaday Critical Defense elsewhere (.38 or .38+P). Hope they will go to the range at least once, and sight it in.

This is all we can hope for....
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Old 02-19-2011, 03:19 PM
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Since we are now using quips, quotes and words of wisdom, I'll now throw in my favorite which I believe comes from Clint Smith:

Concealed carry handguns are meant to be comforting, not comfortable.

Dave Sinko
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Old 02-19-2011, 07:29 PM
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442 or 649...

It just works for me.

I have stealth, a big bullet, and an element of shock and awe.

I carry it nearly every day.

Last edited by wnr700; 02-19-2011 at 07:31 PM.
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Old 02-19-2011, 07:52 PM
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Glock 22 with Speer Gold Dot 155 gr JHP stuck inside (for now) a cheap IWB Blackhawk holster, not very comfortable, but comforting as hell.
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Old 02-19-2011, 08:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by off road View Post
We don't live in a perfect world! These days, I am recommending the Ruger .357 LCR for the average Joe. Supreb recoil absorbing grips (when oh when will S&W learn this lesson???), excellent trigger pull, and 17 oz for at least some recoil absorption. Light, compact, and packable. Load Glasers in the house, and Hornaday Critical Defense elsewhere (.38 or .38+P). Hope they will go to the range at least once, and sight it in.

This is all we can hope for....
I generally leave my students to make their own decision, without a specific recommendation, after they evaluate the requirements THEY will have in a carry gun.

For example, I ask them to think about what THEY expect the gun to do. I ask them to think about THEIR lifestyle, THEIR style of dress, and THEIR activity level. I ask them to make a true, honest assessment of how much time they will realistically spend training with this gun and under what circumstances. And then I ask them to think about what the true role of this gun is going to be and under what circumstances they can expect to have to be able to deploy it efficiently, effectively, and decisively.

You see, the requirements I have for my EDC might be a bit different than the requirements another person may have, and it doesn't really do them any good for me to make a specific recommendation based on MY requirements. That said, I will offer general recommendations as well as give some guidance as they evaluate the questions I asked above.

As for me, a few of my requirements for my EDC:

A) The size/design of the gun MUST lend itself to ME being able to fight with it! That means I must be able to utilize it efficiently even with highly degraded motor skills, under severe stress, and with EITHER hand. It must NOT have any "on/off" (safety) switches that have to be activated in order to make the gun work, even a passive safety such as a grip safety. Also, the gun must be big enough that I can really get my big hands on it so as to fully utilize all of the strength in my grip so I can better retain the weapon.

B) It must be of an adequate defensive caliber. In my mind, I would feel plenty comfortable with 9mm, .357 SIG, .40 S&W, or .45ACP, or in a revolver, .38 SPL +P, .357 Mag., .44 SPL, or .45LC. A .380, IMO, is barely inadequate, and except for very specific and limited circumstances, I would never carry one for anything more than a backup, and then, I would probably carry it loaded with FMJ ammo.

C) The gun needs to be "de-horned" so as not to catch or snag on clothing or it's holster when I go to draw it. There are a number of "fighting" handguns on the market that come this way straight from the factory.

D) It must be absolutely reliable. 100% is ideal (hard to get that with any of the micro guns), and 99.9% is acceptable. Yes, any gun can malfunction at any time. Still, it's best to stay away from designs that are notorious for problems.
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Old 02-19-2011, 09:54 PM
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Originally Posted by off road View Post
I know a lot of folks highly respect Jeff Quinn's reviews at Gunblast. Here is a guy who has fired everything and has access to any gun he wants, yet it is interesting to note that his choice for an EDC gun is the lowly little 11 oz M342 J-frame (carried in his pocket!) and loaded with Glaser Safety Slugs (oh my!), for almost a decade now.

Maybe some wisdom to be gleaned, there???

Smith & Wesson 342PD Titanium Centennial .38 Special +P

Smith & Wesson 340 M&P Lightweight Centennial .357 Magnum Revolver

Ruger LCR .38 Special Pocket Revolver Update
I pay very little attention to any website or magazines that accept advertising. You'll notice S&W as well as Ruger links on Gunblast. And of course S&W's and Ruger are always highly praised. I'm fan of both myself, but neither company pays me any advertising dollars.
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Old 02-19-2011, 10:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Sinko View Post
Since we are now using quips, quotes and words of wisdom, I'll now throw in my favorite which I believe comes from Clint Smith:

Concealed carry handguns are meant to be comforting, not comfortable.
I agree with this, but only to a point.

When it was likely that I might get in a fight I lugged around 50 pounds of gear and ammo. My primary weapon was a highly trained infantryman with a M240B, my M4 was my BUG, and the M9 on my vest was my BBUG. Being comfortable wasn't a concern.

But when I went to McDonalds w/ my wife this evening I had no desire to hang three pounds of steel, brass, and lead on my belt. I just stuck my 642 in my pocket. (In the spirit of complete disclosure, there was also a NAA Black Widow secreted in a hidden compartment in my vehicle.)

IMHO so long as you strive to stay out of uncomfortable situations it's possible to carry a gun that's both comfortable and comforting. It's not an either/or.
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Old 02-19-2011, 11:36 PM
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After handling a Ruger LCP, I appreciate my 638 even more. This revolver is in my front pocket in an Uncle Mike's holster every day, unless I am carrying the 2 1/2 inch 66. I need to practice with the j frame, not as much with the 66. I also have a 459 9mm that is bulky, but fun to carry during deer season-coyote deterrent.
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Old 02-20-2011, 01:36 AM
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I have seen it mentioned many times that the 1911 should not be carrying by those new to concealed carry due to it's manual of arms. Frankly I don't see what's so hard about it.

But I do know first hand that the j frame revolver definately is not a beginners gun. For some it is easy to learn and others not so easy.

The j frame requires dedication to practice and patience. But it can be done.

My everyday carry is an M&P 40 compact with a j frame in the pocket.
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Old 02-20-2011, 09:55 AM
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I have seen it mentioned many times that the 1911 should not be carrying by those new to concealed carry due to it's manual of arms. Frankly I don't see what's so hard about it.....<snip>
There is nothing "hard" about it at all. That said, I've seen seasoned 1911 veterans and beginners alike, fail to disengage the thumb safety as they cleared their holster, as well as failing to adequately depress the grip safety, under nothing more than the typical stress encountered during a training drill on the range. And while that's an easy enough problem to overcome on a range, it could be detrimental in real life. "On/Off" switches on defensive handguns stand a much greater chance of being a liability rather than an asset.
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Old 02-20-2011, 12:05 PM
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..."On/Off" switches on defensive handguns stand a much greater chance of being a liability rather than an asset.
Agreed. I, too, have seen well-trained individuals go "brain dead" under extreme stress, and I have no reason to believe I'm immune.

All firearms require the operator to point at the target and pull the trigger; each step added to this process (rack a slide, disengage a safety, whatever) introduces additional risk--another potential point of failure.

Whether or not that risk is overcome by the potential benefits (larger caliber, increased capacity, etc.) is a decision each person must make for his or her self.
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Old 02-20-2011, 06:07 PM
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My small but effective group of EDC weapons is picked in a way that no matter what my dress is, I'm always armed. So I can carry my big K frame or my small J frame and anything in-between.
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