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Old 03-16-2017, 09:53 PM
Skydog67 Skydog67 is offline
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Default Has anyone read Grant Cunninghamís most recent book?

Protect Yourself With Your Snubnose Revolver

I’m thinking about ordering it, and was just wondering if anyone on the forum has read it? I have one of his other books called Defensive Pistol Fundamentals. I suspect there is probably a lot of overlap/replication between the two books, with the obvious exception that one is tailored specifically to snubnose revolvers whereas the other one is for pistols. Where the information is not specific to a particular style of weapon, I would guess that this book covers a lot of the same ground as his other book(s). Is anyone familiar with both books?

I've already ordered Michael de Bethencourt's booklet "Thirty Eight Straight Tips for Better Snub Shooting" so looking forward to reading that.

I would also be interested in other up to date books on the topic of revolvers/snubbies if anyone has suggestions.

Thank you!

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Old 03-16-2017, 10:48 PM
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I'm reading Protect Yourself With Your Snubnose Revolver right now. I think it's pretty good for someone new to snubnose revolvers. He does a good job of breaking down the skills needed, as well as addressing the weaknesses and strengths of the snub. The drills he provides are pretty good, imo. I'll likely be introducing some of them into my own practice regimen.

I don't have Defensive Pistol Fundamentals, so I can't comment on any overlap.

I do have his book, Gun Digest Book of the Revolver. I highly recommend it for people new to revolvers. He covers some fundamentals, but I like it mostly for the maintenance section. I pretty much follow his recommended cleaning and maintenance procedures.

Also, if you haven't checked it out, Cunningham's blog has a lot of good information, too, and not just regarding revolvers.

Michael deBethencourt's pamphlet is a good read, too. He has a blog at snubtraining.com with lots of good information. FWIW, I use his revolver reloading method.

Another book I often recommend is Ed Lovette's The Snubby Revolver. If you don't know who he is, his background includes service as a US Army Special Forces Officer, police officer/firearms instructor (I believe with a state highway patrol agency, but I can't remember off the top of my head), and CIA paramilitary officer. He includes a lot of case studies as well as his own experience in using the snub revolver. However, there is a section where he writes favorably about exotic ammo, like Magsafe, where I disagree with him. Other than that, it's an excellent read. I've read and re-read it a few times. In fact, I may be due for another re-read soon.

Lovette also co-wrote a book with Dave Spaulding called Defensive Living that covers more generalized personal security information.
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Old 03-16-2017, 11:29 PM
Skydog67 Skydog67 is offline
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I'm reading Protect Yourself With Your Snubnose Revolver right now. I think it's pretty good for someone new to snubnose revolvers. He does a good job of breaking down the skills needed, as well as addressing the weaknesses and strengths of the snub. The drills he provides are pretty good, imo. I'll likely be introducing some of them into my own practice regimen.

I don't have Defensive Pistol Fundamentals, so I can't comment on any overlap.

I do have his book, Gun Digest Book of the Revolver. I highly recommend it for people new to revolvers. He covers some fundamentals, but I like it mostly for the maintenance section. I pretty much follow his recommended cleaning and maintenance procedures.

Also, if you haven't checked it out, Cunningham's blog has a lot of good information, too, and not just regarding revolvers.

Michael deBethencourt's pamphlet is a good read, too. He has a blog at snubtraining.com with lots of good information. FWIW, I use his revolver reloading method.

Another book I often recommend is Ed Lovette's The Snubby Revolver. If you don't know who he is, his background includes service as a US Army Special Forces Officer, police officer/firearms instructor (I believe with a state highway patrol agency, but I can't remember off the top of my head), and CIA paramilitary officer. He includes a lot of case studies as well as his own experience in using the snub revolver. However, there is a section where he writes favorably about exotic ammo, like Magsafe, where I disagree with him. Other than that, it's an excellent read. I've read and re-read it a few times. In fact, I may be due for another re-read soon.

Lovette also co-wrote a book with Dave Spaulding called Defensive Living that covers more generalized personal security information.
Thank you for the feedback!

Yes, Iíve done a lot of reading over at both Cunninghamís and de Bethencourt's websites. And I ordered de Bethencourt's booklet a few days ago.

Iíve also done hours of searching/reading on this S&W forum and found a wealth of information. Lots of great folks here (such as yourself) willing to share their knowledge and experience.

Hereís another good website: http://www.snubnose.info/

Iíve seen that Lovette book recommended before, but it looks like the last time it was updated was about 10 years ago. So I wasnít sure how current it would be. I realize that a great deal of the content would still be relevant, but was concerned that it might be a bit dated when it comes to discussing current bullet technology, accessories, specific guns and their availability, etc.

Iíll probably start with Grantís new book and then move on to the others.

And as for cleaning/maintenance...at least for now, I'm just keeping it as basic and simple as possible using Hickok45's method:
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Old 03-16-2017, 11:49 PM
kthom kthom is offline
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Lovette's book is an old issue, but it is a very interesting read (to me!) and it contains a lot of very good fundamental information that is presented by a man who has served in many very serious situations and conditions. As result of his experiences, the book also contains much information about the things the man behind the gun needs to recognize, understand, and be prepared to do. I don't think you would find reading it any kind of a waste of time. There is a great deal contained in the book to profit from.

I happen to have shared some personal experiences with Mr. Lovette when he was a relatively young man employed as an instructor the the State of New Mexico Law Enforcement Academy located in Santa Fe, NM. NM had recently passed a requirement that all law enforcement officers in NM would receive a qualification and certification course of instruction within a year's period of time in order to serve in any capacity for any agency, and all new hires were also required to become certified within a year of being hired. Mr. Lovette was hired to be one of the instructors in this Academy.

In the beginning, the certification course was a three week period of study and training. That's not much, but it was a huge step in the advancement of officer training in the State. At the time, the only agencies that had a training academy and serious entrance requirements were the Albuquerque Police Department and the New Mexico State Police. The NMSP academy was a three month very intense period of training, with the most stringent entrance requirements in the State. It only occurred once during each year, where as the training sessions for all other agency officers were conducted year round in order to get all sworn officers certified as quickly as possible. I spent two weeks each year instructing firearms in the NMSP academy each year, and got fairly well acquainted with Mr. Lovetter during the times we were there since both academies shared the same facilities. I developed a good deal of respect for him during those times. He went on to bigger and better things, including service in more than one Federal Government agency that included serious work in the Intelligence community in many countries. He has a great love for the .38 Special snub nosed revolver, and carried one in serious harm's way instead of the weapon he was issued to carry. I would say he is an author who has been there and done that, which makes his book about the .38 Special Snubbies a very interesting read. That's the best book report I can give you on his book.

I have always found Grant Cunningham to be a man that seems to have a good deal of common sense with strong opinions about what works. He is also a man who will change his mind about what is best when evidence is encountered to show him new things that are indeed better, or at least which are worthy of consideration. I've read a good bit of his stuff, but not his latest book, so I can't comment or compare it with previous stuff. I would say any of his writing is worth taking the time to read. These are just my personal thoughts about these things, for whatever they might be worth. I have certainly profited from the writings of both men.
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Old 03-17-2017, 12:04 AM
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I highly recommend Mr. Lovette's snubby book. It is packed with excellent, timeless information.

I recently purchased Mr. Cunningham's new book but haven't had time to read it yet.
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Old 03-17-2017, 09:11 AM
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I have read this book but not his other books. I found it to be worth the time and the money. I have incorporated some of his techniques and not others. His method of shooting without sights and with sights is a new (to me) angle on this old, often controversial topic and I am still experimenting with it. I think the book is a good addition to a revolver library.
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Old 03-17-2017, 10:01 AM
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Get Claude Werners snub dvd program

His blog is great reading as well. (It looks like it is unavailable there so not sure whats going on.)

tacticalprofessor | More than weapons manipulation
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Old 03-17-2017, 11:41 AM
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Originally Posted by kthom View Post
I have always found Grant Cunningham to be a man that seems to have a good deal of common sense with strong opinions about what works. He is also a man who will change his mind about what is best when evidence is encountered to show him new things that are indeed better, or at least which are worthy of consideration. I've read a good bit of his stuff, but not his latest book, so I can't comment or compare it with previous stuff. I would say any of his writing is worth taking the time to read.
+1

One of the primary reasons I myself carry a snub revolver is for it's ECQ advantages, handgun combatives, integrated unarmed defensive tactics and whatnot and Grant is not the most well versed and knowledgable instructor in this specific area, but he certainly has never claimed he was and will generally refer anyone looking for that type of training to someone who is. I really respect that because way too many instructors ego will get in the way and claim expertise and teach in areas where they really shouldn't.

I've learned a great deal from him through his written material and conversation and although I have not yet read the book in question, I have no doubt it's worth having in your library.
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Old 03-17-2017, 01:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skydog67 View Post
Iíve seen that Lovette book recommended before, but it looks like the last time it was updated was about 10 years ago. So I wasnít sure how current it would be. I realize that a great deal of the content would still be relevant, but was concerned that it might be a bit dated when it comes to discussing current bullet technology, accessories, specific guns and their availability, etc.
In the book Lovette acknowledges that technology may have advanced beyond his awareness, particularly with regards to ammo. However, the underlying concepts and principles he writes about rarely change, and when they do it's usually just minor tweaks rather than wholesale changes. I still think it's worth a read.

I regret that I wasn't able to attend one of his classes before he retired.
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Old 03-19-2017, 12:39 PM
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I have read Cunningham's "Defensive Pistol" and thought it was a good instructional book. I read it from the standpoint of a former LE instructor, and there was nothing dangerous or contradictory that I noticed. I would prefer a new shooter and especially a new CCW practitioner at least read his book rather than nothing at all. Might inspire someone to pursue further study.

I have not read Cunningham's book on revolvers (nor Lovette's) as of yet. I won't dismiss them because I recall from Cunningham's bio, that he's trained with some good people in the discipline. My revolver training came from the Border Patrol Academy in 1990, and it seems to have been pretty thorough (I've also read Jordan' "No Second Place Winner"). While they are considered pretty simple to operate, there as many skills unique to a revolver that must me mastered to operate one competently as there are with a semi. Revolvers aren't as simple as "loading up and placing on the night stand or or dropping in your pocket...".
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Old 03-19-2017, 01:21 PM
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My revolver training came from the Border Patrol Academy in 1990, and it seems to have been pretty thorough (I've also read Jordan' "No Second Place Winner"). While they are considered pretty simple to operate, there as many skills unique to a revolver that must me mastered to operate one competently as there are with a semi. Revolvers aren't as simple as "loading up and placing on the night stand or or dropping in your pocket...".
I went through FLETC (east and west) back in the day when Model 19's were still the firearms used for training and qualifications. No regrets on the training received and those 19's still hold a spot near and dear to my heart.
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