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Old 03-23-2010, 10:45 AM
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Default Repairing the finish on a Browning stock?

This isn't really 'smithing, so I thought I'd try the lounge.

I have one of those Browning A-bolt Medallion rifles, with the real shiny stock. There are several "chips" and scratches in the shiny finish, not into the wood, and I'd like to work on them.

What's the finish made of? And if it's lacquer or poly, is there a good way to "fill" the marks short of refinishing the stock?

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Munster
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Old 03-23-2010, 11:34 AM
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I have successfully repaired chips in Browning's poly finish using regular two tube epoxy like the kind you can buy in the hardware store. I warm the stock gently with a heat lamp and warm the epoxy too. Be careful not to get either the stock or epoxy too hot. Apply the epoxy to the damaged area and once it has started to set up and get firm you can put it under the heat lamp. You don't want the lamp any closer to the stock than 12", leave under the heat lamp for approx 45 minutes the remove and set aside for 24 hrs. Next day take a small mill file and carefully remove the excess epoxy, once you've filed the hump down it is time to switch to wet or dry abraisive backed by a gum eraser sanding block. Probably best to start with 240 till you get near the surface of the surrounding finish. Then you can switch to 320 to remove scratches from the 240, that done then use 400 till you feather (blend) the repair into the surrounding finish. 600 will polish and finally buff with auto polishing (not buffing) compound and an old tee shirt. A coat of Rennaisance wax and buff with a micro fiber cloth and you're good to go. Take your time and don't rush any step of the process and you will get a nice result.
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Old 03-23-2010, 03:23 PM
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Clear gloss polyurethane will fix scratches, and the 2 part water clear epoxy works for chips.

As mentioned above, go slow with the wet or dry paper. It will look fine once you are done.

I have heard that finish called the "bowling pin" finish because of its thickness and tendency to chip.
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Old 03-23-2010, 09:42 PM
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I worked at the Browning Gunsmithing facility in St. Louis for several years, bowling pin finish is exactly what I called their thick poly finish. While it did give Browning's guns a deluxe appearance it was difficult to work with because of the tendancy to crack and chip. The refinishers had a devil of a time with it chipping when they used an exacto knife to remove the masking tape from the checkering after refinishing.
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Old 03-23-2010, 11:26 PM
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Thanks for the replies. There are so many small scratches that it might take a while.

Munster
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Old 03-24-2010, 01:48 AM
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What would you do if the wood was damaged also, as in deep scrape or gouge? Very good info on the finish itself.
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Old 03-24-2010, 09:56 AM
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Do you think these methods would fix this stock?
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Old 03-24-2010, 11:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gr8AmericanBash View Post
Do you think these methods would fix this stock?
I do believe that one may also require some duct tape
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Old 03-24-2010, 02:31 PM
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I bought a BAR awhile back that had a 2" blister on one side of the buttstock and 2 cracks in the finish running the length of the stock on the other. The forearm was fine. I stripped it, masked off the checkering, and used a spray on gloss polyurethane and gave it several coats. After it was dry I went over it with some automotive polishing compound until it came close to matching the forearm. I then used a little Tru-Oil on the checkering. It looks pretty good, not perfect, but pretty good.
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Old 07-19-2011, 12:52 AM
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I recently purchased a A5 Browning Light 12 gauge in excellent condition. The only flaws on the gun would be a couple of small blemishes on the stock (two small areas that feel a little rough and seem to have gloss finish missing ). I would like to repair these two small areas. Any suggestions?
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Old 07-19-2011, 06:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by potterj View Post
I recently purchased a A5 Browning Light 12 gauge in excellent condition. The only flaws on the gun would be a couple of small blemishes on the stock (two small areas that feel a little rough and seem to have gloss finish missing ). I would like to repair these two small areas. Any suggestions?
If it is a Belgium Browning, I would buy new stocks. Granted, the spots may be small but the gun is worth more than you may think.

I have seen several in really nice shape lately going for over $1200. I was offered $1,000 for one of mine recently and will not sell any of them.
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Old 07-23-2011, 10:56 PM
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The flaws are really small on the stock and would probably need just some little cosmetic repair. For someone who knows what they are doing, they could fix these two small flaws in 20 minutes The gun really is in excellent shape and is Belgium made. Any suggestions on how to fix these two small flaws?
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Old 07-24-2011, 08:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldman45 View Post
If it is a Belgium Browning, I would buy new stocks. Granted, the spots may be small but the gun is worth more than you may think.

I have seen several in really nice shape lately going for over $1200. I was offered $1,000 for one of mine recently and will not sell any of them.
Interesting thread,as the exact gun that I thought about doctoring,is a 1969 Belgian Lt 12 Auto V.The gun is virtually perfect except for a finish chip off of the front edge of the grip.I am the original owner and know that the gun hasn't seen more than 600 rounds.
I have given thought over the years about building up the chip with multiple layers of poly applied by a very small brush.Not to obtain perfection,just to minimize it.Unlike most other Brownings,mine is more of a satin finish.

Last edited by Camster; 07-24-2011 at 08:26 AM.
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