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Old 03-06-2012, 06:11 PM
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Having recently acquired a Swedish M40 Lahti pistol, I thought I'd draft an article on the Lahtis. This is just a draft, and I'd welcome any comments and/or corrections. "Qball", since you are in Sweden, I'd particularly appreciate any input you might offer. At any rate, here goes.

John



The series of L35 and M40 Lahti pistols produced in Finland and Sweden shortly before and during the World War II period are some of the most historical and fascinating military arms of that era. These pistols were specifically designed to be robust and operate reliably in harsh northern winters, and in that mission they performed admirably. Not often seen today in the western world, they are at first glance often mistaken for German P.08 “Lugers,” but they’re in fact quite different. Guns of this type first saw action in the Russo-Finnish War of 1939-40, and while most production had ceased by 1950, they were still in active military service well into the 1980s.

The first pistol of the type was designed and developed in 1929 by Aimo Lahti, a well-known Finnish arms designer. At the request of his superiors, he set out to craft a pistol that could cope with the severe Scandinavian winters better than the standard Lugers then in use. After some continuing improvements, the resulting 9x19mm firearm was adopted by Finland in 1935 and became known as the L35. In neighboring Sweden, that country was also seeking a new handgun to replace its aging M1907 Browning pistols. These were chambered in 9x20mm (SR Browning Long), very similar in power to the current .380 ACP cartridge. The German Walther 9x19mm HP (later P.38) pistol was chosen as the M39. Some were purchased, but with the outbreak of World War II, non-availability of German-made guns and then licensing and production problems on the M39 proved insurmountable for war-neutral Sweden. Seeing the efficient performance of the Finnish Lahti L35 in the Winter War, Sweden decided it would produce a slightly modified version of this outstanding pistol. The Swedes began to produce it in 1942 as the M40. The Finns had their pistols made at the Valtion Kivaaritehdas (State Weapons Factory) in Jyvaskyla. Sweden had theirs produced at Husqvarna Vapenfabriks AB. Both pistols are generically referred to today as Lahtis.

The first Finnish pistols were virtually hand built, and sporadic production was twice halted by conflict with the Russians in 1939-1940 and 1944-1946. When production stopped around 1950, only about 12,000 total L35s had been made. Another 1,250 were ordered in 1958, but since much of the Finnish tooling was then gone, Husqvarna had to step in and produce a hybrid L35/M40 model. In Sweden, Husqvarna was the only manufacturer, and produced over 80,000 M40s and about 1,000 civilian counterparts of the arm between 1942 and 1946. Although the Finns had made some prototypes in 7.65mm Parabellum, all production guns from both counties were made in 9x19mm (9mm Parabellum). The gun illustrated is a Husqvarna-made example, produced in 1945. It shows an “S.S.” inspection mark at the rear, used by Captain Sten Stenmo. In Sweden, because Husqvarna also made iron kitchen ranges and because the M40 was substantial and heavy, it was often called by its nickname, the “iron stove.”

The fact that these pistols resemble the Luger came about naturally, given that the 7.65mm Parabellum pistol was the L35’s predecessor in Finland. Initial field stripping is almost identical to the Luger, where the barrel/receiver assembly is pushed back, and a takedown latch located in the left forefront of the lower receiver is rotated down to release the upper assembly by drawing it forward. However, the Lahti uses an entirely different locking mechanism. The barrel is attached to a box-like extension that encloses most of the action. In this extension, the square cross-section bolt is housed. The bolt has two grooved projections at the rear which are used to retract it manually. On top of the bolt there is a separate moveable locking yoke in the form of an inverted “U”. This fits into grooves in both the bolt and the barrel extension. An internal hammer strikes the firing pin within the bolt. When the gun is fired, the barrel/extension/bolt assembly recoils together about 6 mm. Then the locking yoke is cammed upwards, allowing the bolt to continue to the rear by itself. A unique feature of the Lahti pistols is an ingenious rocking “accelerator” which gives the bolt an additional kick to the rear. This helps cycling when ammo pressure is reduced by extremely cold temperatures. A coiled return spring in the upper part of the bolt returns it to load another round from the magazine. A hold-open device keeps the bolt back on firing the last round. The magazine must be removed or dropped a short distance to allow the bolt to go forward after brief manual retraction. A rotating manual safety is used, placed in a position close to that employed on the Luger. A large ejection port on the right side helps to assure positive ejection of the empty shell. An eight-round magazine is utilized with a very strong internal spring, virtually necessitating the use of a loading tool which is provided in every military holster. The issue flap holsters also contain two extra magazines and a cleaning rod. Although both the L35 and M40 have the grip frames configured for the attachment of a wood and leather shoulder stock, very few of these were made and used, mostly in Finland.

The Finnish and Swedish Lahtis differ in only a few particulars. The Finnish models have a loaded chamber indicator above the barrel/frame junction. Initially, so did the Swedish versions, but these were soon ground off and filled in. Most of the M40s did not have this indicator. The Swedish pistols have a larger trigger guard, soon added after initial production to allow better manipulation with gloved hands. Not long after production started, the M40 was graced with a barrel shoulder that looked like a hex nut. This enabled easier barrel replacement. Early barrels had a ramped front sight base, while most production guns utilized a more upright rectangular base. The fixed sights on these guns are satisfyingly large and visible. The Swedish guns had different metallurgy employed than their Finnish cousins. During the war, there was a shortage of the correct grade of steel made with nickel. Therefore only the barrels were made with the short-supply alloy. The bolt and frames were made from a different grade of steel. In extensive use with powerful submachine ammo (104 grain bullet at 1346 fps), sometimes the bolts cracked. A large number of M40s had their accelerators removed to help prevent this from occurring. Many M1907 pistols were then re-issued. In 1993, Sweden officially retired the M40 and adopted the 9x19mm Glock 17 pistol as the M88. Almost all (about 50,000) of the existing military M40 pistols were ordered to be melted down, much to the dismay of collectors today.

Although Sweden remained neutral during WWII, it unofficially trained refugees from Norway and Denmark, and sold about 10,000 M40 pistols to Denmark for police use after the war. Some unmarked “sterile” M40s exist which were destined for clandestine work with the Swedish military Secret Service. Thousands of Swedish volunteers went to help neighboring Finland in its battles against the Russians, and of course often took their Swedish Lahtis along.

M40 pistols are still popular in Swedish marksmanship events today, and many of these guns are still used by the civil Swedish Pistol Association. A special competition category using M40, L35, M1907 and P.38 pistols is well supported. L35 and M40 pistols are not often encountered today in the U.S., although some M40s were imported, the majority in 1949-1950. These available specimens are eagerly sought after by collectors. Good condition arms, particularly when accompanied by their original holsters and accoutrements, are becoming more and more valuable. The classic Lahti is an interesting and innovative piece of history and deserves an honored place in any military handgun collection.

(c) 2012 JLM
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Old 03-06-2012, 06:36 PM
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Originally Posted by PALADIN85020 View Post
Having recently acquired a Swedish M40 Lahti pistol, I thought I'd draft an article on the Lahtis. This is just a draft, and I'd welcome any comments and/or corrections. "Qball", since you are in Sweden, I'd particularly appreciate any input you might offer. At any rate, here goes.

John



The series of L35 and M40 Lahti pistols produced in Finland and Sweden shortly before and during the World War II period are some of the most historical and fascinating military arms of that era. These pistols were specifically designed to be robust and operate reliably in harsh northern winters, and in that mission they performed admirably. Not often seen today in the western world, they are at first glance often mistaken for German P.08 “Lugers,” but they’re in fact quite different. Guns of this type first saw action in the Russo-Finnish War of 1939-40, and while most production had ceased by 1950, they were still in active military service well into the 1980s.

The first pistol of the type was designed and developed in 1929 by Aimo Lahti, a well-known Finnish arms designer. He set out to craft a pistol that could cope with the severe Scandinavian winters. The resulting 9x19mm firearm was adopted by Finland in 1935, and became known as the L35. In neighboring Sweden, that country was also seeking a new handgun to replace its aging M1907 Browning pistols that were chambered in 9x21mm, very similar to the current .380 ACP cartridge. The German Walther P.38 pistol was chosen as the M39, but with the outbreak of World War Two, licensing and production problems proved insurmountable for war-neutral Sweden. Seeing the efficient performance of the Finnish Lahti L35 in the Winter War, Sweden decided it would produce a slightly modified version of this outstanding pistol. The Swedes began to produce it in 1942 as the M40. The Finns had their pistols made at the Valtion Kivaaritehdas (State Weapons Factory) in Jyvaskyla. Sweden had theirs produced at Husqvarna Vapenfabriks AB. Both pistols are generically referred to today as Lahtis.

The first Finnish pistols were virtually hand built, and sporadic production was twice halted by conflict with the Russians in 1939-1940 and 1944-1946. When production stopped around 1950, only about 12,000 total L35s had been made. Another 1,250 were ordered in 1958, but since much of the Finnish tooling was then gone, Husqvarna had to step in and produce a hybrid L35/M4 model. In Sweden, Husqvarna was the only manufacturer, and produced over 80,000 M40s and about 1,000 civilian counterparts of the arm between 1942 and 1946. Although the Finns had made some prototypes in 7.65mm Parabellum, all production guns from both counties were made in 9x19mm (9mm Parabellum). The gun illustrated is a Husqvarna-made example, produced in 1945. It shows an “S.S.” inspection mark at the rear, used by Captain Sten Stenmo. It’s accompanied by an original military pigskin holster, extra magazines, a cleaning rod and a magazine loading tool. In Sweden, because Husqvarna also made iron kitchen ranges, the substantial M40 was often called by its nickname, the “iron stove.”

The fact that these pistols resemble the Luger came about naturally, for the 7.65mm Luger was the L35’s predecessor in Finland. Initial field stripping is almost identical to the Luger, where the barrel/receiver assembly is pushed back, and a takedown latch located in the left forefront of the lower receiver is rotated down to release the upper assembly by drawing it forward. However, the Lahti uses an entirely different locking mechanism. The barrel is attached to a box-like extension that encloses most of the action. In this extension, the square cross-section bolt is housed. The bolt has two grooved projections at the rear which are used to retract it manually. On top of the bolt there is a separate moveable locking yoke in the form of an inverted “U”. This fits into grooves in both the bolt and the barrel extension. An internal hammer strikes the firing pin within the bolt. When the gun is fired, the barrel/extension/bolt assembly recoils together about 6 mm. Then the locking yoke is cammed upwards, allowing the bolt to continue to the rear by itself. A unique feature of the Lahti pistols is an ingenious rocking “accelerator” which gives the bolt an additional kick to the rear. This helps cycling when ammo pressure is reduced by extremely cold temperatures. A coiled return spring in the upper part of the bolt returns it to load another round from the magazine. A hold-open device keeps the bolt back on firing the last round. The magazine must be removed or dropped a short distance to allow the bolt to go forward after brief manual retraction. A rotating manual safety is used, placed in a position close to that employed on the Luger. A large ejection port on the right side helps to assure positive ejection of the empty shell. An eight-round magazine is utilized with a very strong internal spring, virtually necessitating the use of a loading tool which is provided in every military holster. The issue flap holsters also provide for two extra magazines and a cleaning rod.

The Finnish and Swedish Lahtis differ in only a few particulars. The Finnish models have a loaded chamber indicator above the barrel/frame junction. Initially, so did the Swedish versions, but these were soon ground off and filled in. Most of the M40s did not have this indicator. The Swedish pistols have a larger trigger guard, soon added after initial production to allow better manipulation with gloved hands. The Swedish guns also had different metallurgy employed than their Finnish cousins. During the war, there was a shortage of steel made with nickel. Therefore, only the barrels were made with nickel steel. The bolt and frames were made from molybdenum steel. In extensive use with powerful submachine ammo, sometimes the bolts cracked. A large number of M40s had their accelerators removed to help prevent this from occurring. In 1993, when Sweden retired the M40 and adopted Glock 9mm pistols, about 50,000 of the remaining military M40 pistols were destroyed, much to the dismay of collectors today.

Although Sweden remained neutral during WWII, it unofficially trained refugees from Norway and Denmark, and sold quite a number of M40 pistols to Denmark. Some unmarked “sterile” M40s exist which were destined for clandestine work with the Swedish military Secret Service. Many Swedish volunteers went to their neighbor Finland to help in the battles against the Russians, and of course often took their Swedish Lahtis along.

M40 pistols are still popular in Swedish marksmanship events today, and many of these guns are still used by the civil Swedish Pistol Association. A special competition category using M40, L35, M1907 and P.38 pistols is well supported. L35 and M40 pistols are not often encountered today in the U.S., although a few M40s were imported in 1949-1950. These available specimens are eagerly sought after by collectors. Good condition arms, particularly when accompanied by their original holsters and accoutrements, are becoming more and more valuable. The classic Lahti is an interesting and innovative piece of history and deserves an honored place in any military handgun collection.

(c) 2012 JLM

John-

Looks pretty good, but watch that about the steel content, as many steel alloys include molybdenum. I'd say that the correct grade of special nickel steel alloy was unavailable in Sweden, save for critical parts, and that this may have been partially responsible for the cracking experienced in these guns.

I'd add the ballistics of the M-45 SMG load, whch will also make it clear that hot ammo was a factor. What did Q-Ball say; 108 grains at about 1346 FPS?

I suspect that they were resentfully called The Iron Stove because they were heavy, not just because of the HVA manufacture. See if Q-Ball or another good source can confirm that issue of the M-1907 Browning continued after these guns were adopted. I'd really like to know if the Lahti was withdrawn
from active service after its cracking problem became known.

I'd add that although it superficially resembles a Luger, it looks more like a Glisenti or Nambu, in view of the operating system.

The strong magazine springs may have been a result of the Finnish experience with Luger mags.

Finally, see if Q-Ball can share any photos of the gun in Swedish service. He might do that if he can, for credit as a photo source on the article, or a small portion of the fee.

Otherwise, given your probable space issues at Blue Book, you're good to go.

Nice work on an interesting gun.

Last edited by Texas Star; 03-06-2012 at 06:41 PM.
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Old 03-06-2012, 07:50 PM
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John-

Looks pretty good, but watch that about the steel content, as many steel alloys include molybdenum. I'd say that the correct grade of special nickel steel alloy was unavailable in Sweden, save for critical parts, and that this may have been partially responsible for the cracking experienced in these guns.

I'd add the ballistics of the M-45 SMG load, whch will also make it clear that hot ammo was a factor. What did Q-Ball say; 108 grains at about 1346 FPS?

I suspect that they were resentfully called The Iron Stove because they were heavy, not just because of the HVA manufacture. See if Q-Ball or another good source can confirm that issue of the M-1907 Browning continued after these guns were adopted. I'd really like to know if the Lahti was withdrawn
from active service after its cracking problem became known.

I'd add that although it superficially resembles a Luger, it looks more like a Glisenti or Nambu, in view of the operating system.

The strong magazine springs may have been a result of the Finnish experience with Luger mags.

Finally, see if Q-Ball can share any photos of the gun in Swedish service. He might do that if he can, for credit as a photo source on the article, or a small portion of the fee.

Otherwise, given your probable space issues at Blue Book, you're good to go.

Nice work on an interesting gun.
Thanks for the feedback! I made some relevant changes to the OP, and Qball has put me on to some other info requiring some minor changes. I can use only one photo for the Blue Press, due to space restrictions. I'd sure like to show the holster, as well. Ah well. You guys are great resources!

John
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Old 03-06-2012, 08:44 PM
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Looking for a Finnish version to go with my Swede.

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Old 03-06-2012, 10:31 PM
Walter Rego Walter Rego is offline
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Not that the Lahti's are common in the US, but of them one of the more commonly seen and in my opinion desirable variations are the "D" prefix serial numbered M40 Husqvarna made pistols. They were part of a contract of approximately 10,000 pistols sold to Denmark in late 1945 through 1946 for issue to their police forces. They will bear a crown over H.V. on the rear of the frame. Most I have observed are in excellent shape and may seem to be found with their original holsters that included 2 spare magazines, a cleaning rod and mag loading tool/screwdriver. Since they were not subject to being fired with the hot M39b ammo the chances of finding one without a cracked frame or barrel extension is almost guaranteed. Many of the Swede M40's in the US now are parts guns imported in the 1990's and made up from guns that had cracked components. I would stay away from those, they are typically Air Force or Swede police marked. The Finn L-35's are a real prize and worth about double what a similarly conditioned M40 is worth.
Handling one has been described as like a Ruger .22 Standard Auto on steroids. They are remarkably well sealed against the intrusion of dirt, debris mud and snow and would make a heck of a bludgeon if one ran out of ammo.
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Old 03-07-2012, 04:31 AM
Bat Guano Bat Guano is offline
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I seem to recall Lahtis for sale by Ye Olde Hunter and others circa 1959-60 along with Lugers, P-38s, 1911s and BHPS. All going for about $39.95.

As I was a kid in North Dakota at the time, I could have gotten some first-hand data on Lahti cold weather performance. It was damn sure cold enough!

Article looks good.
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Old 03-07-2012, 06:41 AM
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I like the practicality of having the barrel shoulder in a hex pattern. Were they all designed to take a shoulder stock and what type of stocks were they? Holster style, wood or metal skeleton?
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Old 03-07-2012, 06:43 AM
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John, great article, as usual. I look forward to the history
lessons. Thanks for posting, TACC1.
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Old 03-07-2012, 09:24 AM
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When i was in the army i borrowed a m40 for target practise
I shot three mags and then it broke.
Had to send it back to the armory for scraping.
And i used the ordinary m39 ammo.

Later in my club we had a L35 as a "clubgun"
It to shatterd into smithereens.
Both the frame and the slide had multiple cracks.
We only used m39 for that to.

Now i have a Husqvarna m07 in 9mmBrowningLong (9x20)
It's a civilian version made somwhere in the 1930th
Had to change the gripsafety and triggerasembly for safer shooting.
It slamfired a few times, accuatly twice as i thought that
i had the finger on the trigger the first time.
Very easy to disassamble, but when i was to put it together,
that was when the fun started

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Old 03-07-2012, 11:53 AM
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I like the practicality of having the barrel shoulder in a hex pattern. Were they all designed to take a shoulder stock and what type of stocks were they? Holster style, wood or metal skeleton?
Check the original post, which has been modified to address your question. I appreciate input like this!

John
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Old 03-07-2012, 10:16 PM
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I like the practicality of having the barrel shoulder in a hex pattern. Were they all designed to take a shoulder stock and what type of stocks were they? Holster style, wood or metal skeleton?
Regarding the shoulder holsters: Check Anthony Vanderlinden's excellent book Holsters and Shoulder-Stocks of the World. The Finn Lahti L-35 holster/stock is shown on page 119. It is very much like the wooden Browning P35 holster stocks wherein the pistol fits inside under a hinged lid and a spare magazine is carried on the outside. They are exceedingly rare, with only 53 produced. There were some offered through Shotgun news several years ago that supposedly were Danish in origin, they were a plain, flat board stock and were possibly modern reproductions.
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Old 03-08-2012, 01:37 AM
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I have often heard of these guns referred to by WWII vets as either Finnish or Swedish Lugers.
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Old 03-08-2012, 02:55 AM
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Here is a holster pic.
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Old 03-08-2012, 12:30 PM
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I've posted this before, but here is a pic of the standard Swedish Lahti Army holster. They were done in both cowhide and pigskin; this is a pigskin example. The Air Force holsters were dyed black.

The holster contains two spare magazines, a cleaning rod, and a magazine loading tool. Additional issue items were a dual-canister oiler and a leather lanyard.

John

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Old 09-01-2012, 11:14 PM
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I have a Husqvarna M/40, serial # H1xx. The serial is at the extreme front of the left side, not half way back like I have seen. Anybody have an idea why the difference? It is in GREAT (like new; not refinished) shape and all numbers match.
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Old 09-01-2012, 11:18 PM
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Paladin

That's a little to much reading of me. (go figure)


Anyway you got some "cliff notes" on that.
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Old 09-03-2012, 01:19 AM
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I bought a Lahti M40 many years ago. It came without the accelerator, and I found it wouldn't function without it, even with hot ammunition.

Fortunately, THe Gun Parts Corp had them in stock, and I replaced it with little difficulty. I think it used a small pin, that I bought with the accelerator.

I also bought one of the issue holsters for it, which came with the REALLY necessary loading tool, the curious oil can, two magazines, the cleaning rod, and a cloth, not leather, lanyard. I bought two of the holsters, actually, one in 'rough' condition, but it came with the oil can, an extra loading tool, and two more magazines.

My holster isn't as nice as the one pictured above, but considering it's age, it's not bad. It's nice to have the original accessories for a WWII vintage pistol, and it wasn't too expensive, IIRC.

The bore on my Lahti is pretty rough, having suffered from corrosive ammunition, yet it still turns in extremely good accuracy.

Of all the 9mm's I've fired, the only one that turns in better accuracy is a HK P9S Target Model, which has a much better trigger, HK's flat sided (early type) polygonal bore, and adjustable target sights.

I shoot my very mild cast lead bullet reloads in it, and at 25 feet, it shoots right to point of aim. It is a real pleasure to shoot.

I have a 1977 Guns and Ammo magazine that featured the Lahti M40 on the cover, calling it the 'Luger Look Alike'.

The article described how to field strip, and reassemble the M40, and when I bought mine, that's what I used as a guide.

I love shooting my M40. The trigger is much better than most Lugers, but still fairly heavy, as you would expect from a 'service pistol'.

But, the sights are vastly better than a 4" Luger's, and as I said, mine delivers extremely good accuracy, despite the condition of the bore, even with cast lead bullets.

I would love to get a new, or at least better barrel for my Lahti, but then, although the bore doesn't LOOK all that good, it does shoot very well indeed. If it ain't broke....

I take it with me to the range, nearly every time I go, since it is so much fun to shoot.

It is a vastly superior design to the overly complicated Luger, but it is larger and heavier, and the venerable Luger was designed at the dawn of the autoloader age.

By today's standards, the Lahti is a very large, heavy gun that only holds 9 rounds of 9mm ammunition, but it's still a marvelous work of engineering.

They sure did something right when they built them, since mine has obviously seen some duty use, the bore was neglected, yet it capable of such good accuracy.

Once I nstalled the accelerator, I've never had a failure of any kind with it, even though I feed it many times reloaded mixed brand range brass pick ups.

My 1936 Luger is fussy about ammunition. The Lahti: not so much.
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Old 09-03-2012, 02:24 PM
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I've seen a couple of these floating around at my local gun show, after reading this I might have to pick one up! Thanks PALADIN! Dale
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Old 09-18-2012, 11:27 AM
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Thanks for the history on these fascinating pistols.

I had understood that Sweden produced holsters for the Danish contract M-40S pistols, but had never seen one, and just assumed that the Danes used Swedish triple crown marked M40 holsters. Then, I found and purchased what I believe to be the correct Danish contract holster, pictured below. Note the Danish crown on the tab that's identical to those on the gun. Construction is different as well. The shape is slightly different, and there are no provisions for the loading tool or cleaning rod. The accessories shown are Swedish, as would have been supplied to the Danes. The lanyard is not marked.

The "HV" mark on the receiver of the Danish contract pistols does not stand for Husqvarna, but rather for “Haerens Vapenarsenal”, or Army Armory in Danish. Magazines should have the same small crown mark low on the spine.

My own Danish contract M-40S is D904x, in excellent unissued original condition. The trigger guard is lightly stamped 'SA, RIDGEFIELD'. It is the most accurate 9mm service pistol that I have ever fired, though I don't think much of the long, muddy trigger pull!

Thanks again!
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Old 12-26-2012, 05:49 PM
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Where was the oil can set carried ? The holster has pockets for the two spare magazines, the mag loader, and the rod, but no apparent place to carry the curious oil cans. I presume the double chamber oil can had liquid oil in one side, and a thicker grease in the other ?
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Old 02-03-2013, 03:06 PM
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Thank you Paladin! My father was in the Israeli Army in the 1950s, and left me his L-35 when he died (along with his S&W series 59, which is nowhere NEAR as fun to shoot!). I've been looking for information on it, and have found quite a few bits and pieces online. Your research has filled in a lot of the gaps for me!

I'm not quite enough of a history buff to worry about being 100% accurate, but I am trying to decide 1) If it's important to me to have a holster for this gun, and 2) If it matters to me whether it's the Israeli (canvas?) one he would have carried, the Finnish leather holster originally intended for the L-35, or the Swedish M40 holster which should fit it just fine, but isn't the OEM, as it were.

The main thing I'm thinking is that, if I AM going to get a holster, it would be nice to have the Finnish model that carries two mags, a loader, and the cleaning tool, as well as having loops on the back for a regular belt. I guess there's no hurry on this particular purchase, since holsters aren't on the list of items to ban in the near future

I welcome any other thoughts people have on the merits of the different holsters that fit this fine, fine gun!
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Old 04-20-2015, 12:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bat Guano View Post
I seem to recall Lahtis for sale by Ye Olde Hunter and others circa 1959-60 along with Lugers, P-38s, 1911s and BHPS. All going for about $39.95.
An old but interesting thread.

The Lahti pistols were being sold in the USA for $50 back in 1950, which was a lot of dough back then. However, they did include a holster. See the ad below from 1950.

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Old 04-20-2015, 01:18 PM
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Older thread, I know, but the last (4th) variation of the Finnish L-35 is Valmet marked and has no shoulder stock mount. Most (but not all) have no loaded cartridge indicator. It's as slick and well finished as ever, though. I own one, along with its Finnish holster, which looks like an oversize P.08 holster. The leather was originally black, but has been dyed a dark purple, denoting border guard service.
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Old 04-20-2015, 04:35 PM
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I picked a M40 lathi in 9mm luger "D" Denmark pistol made by husqvarna.
Came with three mags, holster and cleaning rod. Haven't shot it yet. But it's a sweet looking pistol. My online dealer had two more but they sold quick.
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Old 05-12-2015, 01:08 PM
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Just traded for one ( serial Number D5624 ) so I am guessing it is Danish Police issue. Any one know what the brass tag with 29 stands for? Condition is about 90% or better and has a holster and 2 mags. No cleaning rod or mag tool
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Old 05-12-2015, 11:03 PM
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Thanks for sharing the history OP.

My Dad picked up a Husky model back in the 70's (my brother has it now), it was the first 9mm we ever shot as kids. And we shot the snot out of that thing with nary a hiccup. Great pointing pistol, accurate as heck. And quite unique.
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Old 05-13-2015, 03:39 AM
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Thank you Duster for calling it by it's correct name

"M40 Husqvarna" is made in Sweden by Husqvarna
"L35 Lahti" is made by Valtion Kivääritehdas (VKT) in Finland

Huge different, at least here in Scandinavia

By the way, i have heard that the L35 is a better pistol than the M40
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Old 06-26-2015, 03:14 AM
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Looks like a lot of the 4th Variation Lahti L-35 are just on the market.
I heard they are imported from Israel.
I picked up two of them.(-:
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Old 06-26-2015, 04:12 AM
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Piece of trivia for you: there was a gap between the time that Sweden withdrew the Lahti from service for safety reasons (1986) and the adoption of the Glock (1988). The M1907 (both FN and Husqvarna-manufactured Browning/FN 1903s), was brought out of reserve as a stop-gap. The 9X20mm Browning cartridge was more powerful than the .380ACP (110 gr. at about 1050 fps), but eventually lost out to the more capable 9mm Parabellum. The 1903/07 was a chunky, long-barreled blowback, and while it worked quite well, was the least successful of FN's Browning pistols. Source: Vanderlinden - "FN Browning Pistols".
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Old 06-26-2015, 09:01 AM
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What are the Danish contract ones going for?? I picked one up, complete with holster, 3 mags, rod and tool, for $450.00 just 3 or 4 months ago. (at Cabelas no less)
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