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Old 11-23-2013, 06:12 PM
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Default Knife Sharpening

I finally broke down and bought some nice well made knives as opposed to those cheap ones I have used for years. I was wondering what the best way to sharpen and maintain a good knife. I have my grandfathers old whetstone, though it is all smooth now. I know some guys that used a bench grinder but that seems risky. Also those little hand held jobs you run the knife though never seem to work for me. Any thoughts or opinions would be appreciated. I admit I am ignorant, with the cheap knives I just tossed them when wore out.
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Old 11-23-2013, 06:17 PM
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I tried a lot and finally got a Lansky.
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Old 11-23-2013, 06:20 PM
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The best, imho, is the Spyderco Sharpmaker. Way easier to use than a Lansky, and it works well on a lot of edged tools.



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Old 11-23-2013, 06:24 PM
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I posed the same question a while back:
http://smith-wessonforum.com/lounge/...ning-help.html

I ended up buying a Lansky 5-stone kit.
Once you get the hang of it, it puts a very nice edge on the blade. I'm very happy with it.
I use a sharpening steel to tune up the edges in between sharpening.

The kit I bought is kit number "LKCLX" at Lansky dot com.
The website shows the kit for $49.99, I bought mine locally for $44.99.
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Old 11-23-2013, 07:14 PM
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For me I use a stone and sharpen by hand just like my father did. My brother however, uses the Lansky system with great success. I don't like it and have never been able to get a decent edge with the Lansky system. Give me a good stone and it does not take long at all. The stone I use most has some kind of diamond chips in it. I bought it so long ago I don't remember exactly what it is.
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Old 11-23-2013, 07:15 PM
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Thanks those both look pretty neat. Around here most guys still use a Whetstone and oil. It just seems like it takes forever. Do those things need to be replaced?
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Old 11-23-2013, 07:36 PM
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I always hated sharpening knives on wet stones and one day in Academy they had the diamond finish Lansky set for 50% off and I bought one. You can make a dull knife really sharp in just a few minutes and it did not take very long to learn how to use it. It was actually so fun I got all our kitchen knives out and sharpened them and actually put a razor edge on a big meat cleaver we had that was extremely dull. I now love chopping big vegetables or a small melons with that big cleaver, and I would definitely recommend the upgraded, diamond finish Lansky set.
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Old 11-23-2013, 07:52 PM
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Depends on how dull ya let it get before it gets sharpened. If I get a knife and the egde is practically rounded, I'll use a medium diamond impregnated sharpening pad to define the edge, a fine Arkansas oil stone to do the actual sharpening and an extra fine Arkansas oil stone to polish and refine the edge.
After I'm happy with it, I'll use an extra fine diamond impregnated sharpening rod every now and then to keep it sharp.
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:00 PM
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Knife sharpening is one of the manly skills. As such, many don't know how or refuse to invest the time and effort to learn. Yes, you may also have a small investment in materials. So lay off the concert circuit or golf course for at least one weekend.

I have a Lansky, someplace. I use an Edgepro for most of my sharpening. I like it because it uses larger stones than the Lansky. There are also books on the subject. I did like "Razor Edge Sharpening", and was glancing at it in my bookshelf this afternoon. You need to know what you're doing to manage a good job.

There is a mail order place, Seattle edge (dot com) where you can ship your knives and he'll do the dirty work for you, if you please. He gets rave reviews over on the sig forum.

One of the first steps to take is acquire a good magic marker, the permanent kind. Don't believe the permanent part, it grinds right off! Then make a line about an eighth inch wide right down the cutting edge of both sides. A good magnifier helps a bunch. Then take a few strokes and look at your line. It tells you where you're taking metal off. Anything above the first 1/16th of an inch means you're wasting your time, effort, and the knife material. You only sharpen the edge, nothing else.

So the next time you're around a "woodsman" kind of guy, ask him if he'd let you look at his sheath knife. Its a reasonable request, and most are proud of their equpiment. But if you see stone marks a half inch up away from the edge, it tells you something and its not all good!
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:04 PM
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i find that for a traditional shaped edge a stone is fine but some edges with a recurve are difficult or almost impossible to sharpen on a flat stone .a ceramic rod system has worked well for me in these cases. have recently purchased a spiderco kit ,but have not used it yet.
whatever you guys use, try finishing up with a leather strop and some jewellers' rouge. your blade looks beautifully finished with the edge fading into the blade seemlessly. shaving sharp too.
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rburg View Post
One of the first steps to take is acquire a good magic marker, the permanent kind. Don't believe the permanent part, it grinds right off! Then make a line about an eighth inch wide right down the cutting edge of both sides. A good magnifier helps a bunch. Then take a few strokes and look at your line. It tells you where you're taking metal off. Anything above the first 1/16th of an inch means you're wasting your time, effort, and the knife material. You only sharpen the edge, nothing else.
Good point, I personally use a red Sharpie, it's easier for me to see. I call it inking the edge.
It enables you to see exactly where you're removing material.
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:08 PM
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This is, by far, the best sharpener I have used.

AccuSharp Knife Sharpeners - Sharpen Knives, Cutting Tools, Garden Tools, Scissors, Axes - AccuSharp Knife and Tool Sharpener (001)
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Old 11-23-2013, 10:08 PM
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Thank you, gentlemen. This is a fun thread!

I have a couple of sets of Arkansas stones, including the "surgical black" that have served me well over the decades.

Mike Ramay, aka Sixty Megacycle Michael, an ex-underwater sailor with whom I worked on Long Island a long time ago, taught me how to sharpen knives. You can always shave with the edges he achieves. Mine too, usually.

I believe Mr. Dick Burg expressed my feelings on this subject best and I am going to "reward" him by stealing his edge marking technique.

Thank you, sir!
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Old 11-23-2013, 11:26 PM
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You're not stealing it. I gave it out freely to anyone who wants to use it. You should also get a magnifier. It helps you see what the sharpening does.

There are also some hints as to who is a sharpener. Look at his weak side forearm. If its kind of blotchy with large sections of removed hair, he's been working and testing!

Oh, and please don't call me "Mr." Its just Dick. I'm an old guy who doesn't stand on formality these days.
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Old 11-23-2013, 11:48 PM
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After a half dozen "miracle" knife sharpeners, systems, blah blah blah, I bought a Medium, Fine & Extra Fine set of Arkansas stones. They measure 2" wide x 8' long and I kept practicing my technique until I got it just right. Now I can sharpen any knife in a few minutes good enough to shave with. Any GOOD knife that is, not the cheap stainless steel ones that you just cant get sharp.

Not only did I get good at kitchen, pocket, sheath and utility knives, but I am also pretty fair at Chisels, axes, and scalpels. Yes scalpels - the old fashioned ones from the 30's & 40' with fixed blades. My Dad had them when he was in College and I use them around the Shop now.
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Old 11-23-2013, 11:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rburg View Post
You're not stealing it. I gave it out freely to anyone who wants to use it. You should also get a magnifier. It helps you see what the sharpening does.

There are also some hints as to who is a sharpener. Look at his weak side forearm. If its kind of blotchy with large sections of removed hair, he's been working and testing!

Oh, and please don't call me "Mr." Its just Dick. I'm an old guy who doesn't stand on formality these days.
Ah, well, sorry about the formal address.

It's a sign of respect for someone who has earned it . . . from one old guy with missing forearm hair to another.
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Old 11-24-2013, 12:16 AM
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The DMT W8F 8-Inch Diamond Whetstone Sharpener is my favorite. You use it with water so clean up is easy, and the one stone lets you get a knife sharp enough to shave hairs off your arm. And it takes about 10% of the effort it takes to get the same sharpness using medium then hard Arkansas stones with oil.


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Old 11-24-2013, 12:22 AM
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I learnt from my dad, who had worked as a butcher after returning from Korea. The first thing is to never let the knife get dull. I use a steel fairly constantly. If I get a nick or dull spot (I.e., after the wife tries to sharpen one) I'll use a diamond stone. On new knives I use my Smiths stone set to establish the edge. I will also use a ceramic rod when I'm in the mood....
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Old 11-24-2013, 01:01 AM
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The DMT W8F 8-Inch Diamond Whetstone Sharpener is my favorite. You use it with water so clean up is easy, and the one stone lets you get a knife sharp enough to shave hairs off your arm. And it takes about 10% of the effort it takes to get the same sharpness using medium then hard Arkansas stones with oil.
That's another thing Mikey taught me. You can use water on your Arkansas stone, or better yet water with some rubbing alcohol added, in place of oil.

Yes, you might end up with some residue on the stone, especially if you let it dry out. But, keeping it wet during the sharpening process is easy. I usually flood the stone when I am finished, scrub with a wet paper towel to remove the residue, and then use a fresh towel to dry the stone before putting it away.

It's worth making certain the stone has dried completely before putting it away so that the moisture doesn't cause your nice, redwood box to crack, hence the alcohol in the mix . . . to make drying easier.

Admittedly, I just put that $75 diamond stone on my "when I win the lottery" list. Thank you for the tip!

I am going to win the lottery, right?

Yeah, sure, kid.
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Old 11-24-2013, 01:07 AM
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I've used a stone my Dad used. I'm 64 so the stone is older than I am.

I don't find the old stone and oil difficult or time consuming.

Of course, I prefer carbon steel blades. I have no interest in stainless blades.

My preference for good old stones is tied to my preference for NON stainless blades.

I have no opinion about how to sharpen stainless steel blades, since my experience is that they are hard to sharpen and don't hold an edge reliably. I don't use them.

Just my experience, of course.
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Old 11-24-2013, 01:13 AM
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I use a simple flat 2 sided diamond coated block.

You can get them for about $17.

heres how you use it.

1. Place block on level stable surface
2. Spray windex on it *windex is an amazing blade lubricant!*
3. hold the knife between 20-30* higher the degree, the more durable the edge will be, but less sharp, lower the degree, sharper but dulls quicker. I would say 25* for a pocket or hunting knife
4.Start with the rough side of the block.
5. In strong but small circular motions, swirl the blade around the surface of the block. until the rough feeling becomes smooth
6. flip the knife over and repeat on the other side.
7.Take the blade at your desired angle, place it on the block and push it away from you in a straight line. Make sure to do this all along the blade to remove the burr.
8. flip the block over to the smooth side.
9. Repeat the process all over again, adding windex as needed for lubrication.

When done your blade should be able to shave paper, or hair with little effort.

I've been doing it this way for a LONG time. Never failed me :-) Even my $10 ozark trail wally world knife is sharper than most SOG's, and BOKER's out of the box :-D

Hope this helps.
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Old 11-24-2013, 09:08 AM
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A few observations;

Cheap stainless blades will ruin a good Arkansas stone(s).

Good blades will ruin a conventional butchers 'steel'. Especially if it's a cheap one.

For my kitchen knives , I picked up a 12in oval shaped diamond rod. Use it like a butchers steel , just remember to keep the blade at approx. 15 degrees per side. And use it wet with water.

Also picked up a 1in dia 12in long ceramic rod for that final touch.
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Old 11-24-2013, 10:22 AM
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I use the GATCO sharpening system.

GATCO: Sharpeners: Sharpening Systems: Edgemate Pro
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Old 11-24-2013, 10:27 AM
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JMO, but I would recommend you learn to sharpen by hand using Arkansas stones OR DMT Diamond whetstones (or similar product).....it's a useful skill that you will be able to use for life and not be dependent on some apparatus or bulky system. Just takes a little attention and time to learn and once you learn it's like riding a bicycle .... you will never forget.

Pretty easy to slip a small whetstone in your pack when out hunting and be able to touch-up your knife edge.....can't do that with some "system".


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Old 11-24-2013, 10:38 AM
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I picked up one of those 4-sided/grit diamond blocks at Harbor Freight for around $20 and it's well worth it. Diamond sharpening tools should be use wet with water. As I mentioned above , cheap stainless blades will clog and ruin a good natural Arkansas or India stone in short order.

The better stainless knives are actually high carbon rust resistant steel , like 440C. They will show rust if left in the dishwater!
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Old 11-24-2013, 10:41 AM
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I have a couple of good oilstones but usually I use a coarse diamond pad, a fine diamond pad and for touch ups in the kitchen a diamond rod, like a butcher's steel.
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Old 11-24-2013, 10:52 AM
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Just let me also mention here that Norton makes a Honing Oil SUITABLE AND SAFE for use on Kitchen knives and equipment. I know we all wipe off & wash the Kitchen knives after sharpening, but it's nice to know their oil is approved for use around food. Works just as well as the standard honing oil and is not expensive. It's all I use now.
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Old 11-24-2013, 10:55 AM
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I guess I'm really old school when it comes to knife sharpening.

First off, like A10 mentioned, I try never to let my knives get dull in the first place. I'm always touching them up after use.

For the most part, I use an old 8-inch Norton hard Arkansas stone. That will usually bring the blade to where it will remove patches of hair from my forearm.

Then, I move to an ancient 10-inch Escher stone, the kind that was designed for sharpening straight razors. That brings the blade to where it will shave the fuzz off a peach.

Finally, I move to a ceramic stone. After a few minutes on that, I can use the blade for castrating gnats.

Seriously, though, as woodsltc said, learning to use a whetstone is a valuable skill. I think it was either Outdoor Life or Field and Stream that ran an article several months ago on the value of being "old school." They mentioned that knowing how to sharpening a knife with a whetstone was definitely "old school." Yep, it's a valuable skill one should learn.
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Old 11-24-2013, 11:13 AM
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I need to buy some stones and relearn that skill.Had a goofy urge to cut and split firewood this fall.A little work with a new file and stone did wonders for the old axe and wedge.These new mauls with the fiberglass handles and a big pimple on each side of the head are fantastic after a little touch up.
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Old 11-24-2013, 11:27 AM
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I've got a lot of sharpening equipment but for just knives I like the Spyerco Triangle Sharpmaker mentioned above or the Worksharp Knife and Tool Sharpener.

Water stones, oil stones, ceramic stones, and diamond stones work well but it takes more skill to stay on the bevel of a two bevel knife. I do use stones on single bevel knifes. They have larger bevels and the stones handle the flat side bur easily.

P.S. Any of the above systems will sharpen a knife. Get a good one and learn to use it. Take it from me, you can
spend a small fortune trying to find the "best." The key is experience with one system.

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Old 11-24-2013, 11:33 AM
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I'm and old fashion guy and for years used a set of Arkansas wet stones and leather strop to sharpen my knives to razor sharp edges. I still use them on my hunting knives.

Eight or nine years ago I was given a Chef's Choice electric sharpener. I had tried other gimmick sharpeners and most just ruined good blades. That isn't the case with the Chef's Choice. I use it on my good kitchen knives and does a fantastic job in a quick simple manner.

Chef'sChoice Edge Select Pro Electric Sharpener M120 | CHEFScatalog.com
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Old 11-24-2013, 11:34 AM
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There was a post on this not that long ago with a lot of different answers. Try a search, I vote for lansky.
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Old 11-24-2013, 11:46 AM
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I've got a fairly new Buck 119 that is eating my lunch trying to put a good edge on it. I wasn't happy with the edge from the factory, while pretty sharp it wasn't where I wanted it. After I got through messing with it it sucks sure enough now. I have Old Timers, Shrades and such I can sharpen and shave with literally all these, but the Bucks have always eat my lunch and I have three of them. Might mention the 119 knife has about 1/8" taper from the point of the blade through the curve till the edge goes straight then there is little or no taper in the blade till you almost get to the heal. Came that way. I've used my Arkansas stones and my EZ lap diamond with little or no success. Kind of humbles a guy when he can put a razor edge on all mas' kitchen knives and my pocket knives. Lastly I know about the angle you have to use on a Buck to put and edge on it but this is still getting me nowhere. About ready to send it back to Buck for sharpening but my stubborn pride won't let me.
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Old 11-24-2013, 12:28 PM
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Years ago(40+) an old deer hunter showed me how he sharpened his hunting knife...
he called it "progressive". I've been using this method ever since.

From the hilt it starts out course and becomes fine going to the point. This way he could cut hard cartilage or through the breast bone with the hilt half without dulling the forward razor edge of the blade.

I start with the blade at a higher angle at the hilt.. as the blade moves down the stone towards the point.. I decrease the angle of the blade on the stone.

So.. it may start out at around 20-30 degree and end at the point around 15 degrees or so.
I don't "drag" the blade on the stone...it's as if I'm cutting a slice from the stone(cutting edge leading).

Here is some good info on angles...

Under 10 Degree Angles
The lowest angles are reserved for edges that are typically cutting softer materials. In this case, the edges are not subject to abuse so the lower angle can be maintained without damage or edge failure. The lowest angles that we typically see are on straight edge razors. These are sharpened to an angle which is roughly 7 to 8 degrees (although the back of the blade is used as a guide so knowing the angle isn’t important and nor is it adjustable). A straight razor has a very delicate edge that is very easy to damage. In proper usage, a straight razor would never see the type of use that would damage the edge.

10 to 17 Degrees Angles
A sharpening angle of 10 to 17 degrees is still quite low for most knives. With a total angle of 20 to 34 degrees, this is still a very fine edge. This edge is typically too weak for any knife that might be used in any type of chopping motion. Also consider that harder steels are also more susceptible to impact damage because they are more brittle. If your knife is used for cutting soft items or slicing meats, this lower angle can hold up and provide a very smooth cutting action.

17 to 22 Degree Angles
A 17 to 20 degree angle covers most kitchen knives. Some knives (typically Japanese manufacturers) will sharpen their knives to roughly 17 degrees. Most western knives are roughly 20 degrees. It is our experience that kitchen knives sharpened to 15 to 20 degrees cut very well and are still durable. These angles are still not highly durable as a total angle under 40 degrees will not respond well to rougher treatment in harder materials.

22 to 30 Degree Angles
In this range, the knife edges are considerably more durable. A pocket knife or a hunting knife will inevitably see abuse not seen by knives meant primarily for slicing or chopping softer materials. While the edge may not ultimately be cut as well (but you may not notice a difference) it will be considerably more durable.

Over 30 Degrees Angles
Any edged tool or knife that is sharpened past 30 degrees will be very durable. Its cutting ability will be noticeably reduced. This durability has an advantage because more force can be used to make the cut. While the majority of knives won’t benefit from this sharpening angle, an edged tool like a machete, cleaver or axe must be durable as the typical cutting action of these tools would damage other edges.

POPPER.. I bought a Buck 119 in 1969 and have used it on many deer.. yes, it's sharp!!

Last edited by 1morethan8; 11-24-2013 at 12:32 PM.
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Old 11-24-2013, 12:35 PM
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For a quick touch-up , I like these things from Lansky.



These have ceramic rods , but I found some identical ones on E-bay with diamond rods in them. I have a set sets around.
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Old 11-24-2013, 12:38 PM
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I bought a Loray back in the 70's when they first came out. Lost it in a move and have been using a similar Lansky system ever since. If you want a factory edge this is the thing to use.
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Old 11-24-2013, 12:46 PM
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I like sharp tools and use different methods for knives, chisels, plane irons, etc. Sometimes with knives I use a simple set of crock sticks, sometimes a stone. Depends on my mood and the condition of the knife. Plane irons and chisels I use sandpaper up to 1600 grit glued to a piece of granite.

As mentioned before it's a valuable skill, and it's easier to keep a sharp knife sharp than to work one dull and have to sharpen it back to where it needs to be.

I've used a Lansky and they seem to work fine.

The best thing with whatever method you choose would be to pick up something like some Old Hickory knives at a yard sale--they have good steel and would be great to practice on. Better to spend that learning curve on something inexpensive.

Here's an old axe I rehabbed. Like I said, I like sharp tools:

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Old 11-24-2013, 01:58 PM
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The way my wife treats a kitchen knife I won't buy a good set. I sharpen on a 1" belt sander with a 550 grit belt that is about worn out. Only takes a few seconds to get an edge for her knives. My knives are sharpened one stroke at a time on a bench stone I've had for over 40 years.
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Old 11-24-2013, 02:02 PM
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I have had good luck over the years with a Lansky Sharpener


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Old 11-24-2013, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooter Brown View Post
I like sharp tools and use different methods for knives, chisels, plane irons, etc. Sometimes with knives I use a simple set of crock sticks, sometimes a stone. Depends on my mood and the condition of the knife. Plane irons and chisels I use sandpaper up to 1600 grit glued to a piece of granite.

As mentioned before it's a valuable skill, and it's easier to keep a sharp knife sharp than to work one dull and have to sharpen it back to where it needs to be.

I've used a Lansky and they seem to work fine.

The best thing with whatever method you choose would be to pick up something like some Old Hickory knives at a yard sale--they have good steel and would be great to practice on. Better to spend that learning curve on something inexpensive.

Here's an old axe I rehabbed. Like I said, I like sharp tools:

Keep that away from Lizzy Borden.
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Old 11-24-2013, 02:50 PM
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My dad could put a scalpel sharp edge on a butter knife(mild embellishment) using stones. Myself, I can turn a good edge into a butter knife....
So, a year or so ago, I used a Worksharp demo. machine on my carry knife(S&W Tactical folder) and was amazed at the great results.
Bought one and use it all the time, not a dull knife in the house. Even sharpened a spade that I was going to use.
I know that it's not art but for me, it beats the alternative.
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Old 11-24-2013, 09:06 PM
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I learned from my Dad and his Dad on an oil stone. Every blade is different. Steel and shape make all of them different. For example a old high carbon steel (think older Cases) takes a lesser angle and a Swiss army stainless a little less angle. The stainless when sharpened to a fine edge will actually fold over when over done. It just takes practice.

I don't need a system, Just feel.
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Old 11-24-2013, 09:10 PM
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I've always gotten good results with crock sticks. Good thing, it's the only sharpener I know how to use.
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Old 12-22-2013, 05:26 PM
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Default Knife Sharpening

One word: Lansky.

BTW, bench grinders have probably ruined more blades than anything else The garden variety spins at 3650 RPM, way too fast for grinding carbon steel. I use one to sharpen my lathe chisels which are high speed steel and much harder to burn than ordinary carbon steel. Even that requires a very light touch with a white wheel to avoid burning and destroying the temper of the steel (when the steel turns blue, you've destroyed the temper.)

Besides, sharpening is actually honing. You only grind when you need a new bevel, which you should just about never need on a knife.


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Old 12-22-2013, 05:58 PM
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The key to a good edge is patience. These days everybody is in a hurry. They want everything right now. I think that's the reason most of these fancy sharpening systems really exist.
As for me, I use a simple old stone, a little oil and usually just sit down in front of the TV. I take my sweet time and do the job right.
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Old 12-22-2013, 08:07 PM
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Time for me to write a novel....

In my illspent youth, I learned to sharpen. One day I was so proud of my abilities I spent a lazy afternoon sharpening all of mom's kitchen knives to the point where I was satisfied. Then as young teens often do, I forgot all about it. So mom was preparing supper and let out a terrible scream. Of course dad went running to see what happened. It didn't take him long to start yelling for and at me. Then we retired to the front stoop so he could destroy all my work. He wasn't as mad as I'd feared. He just pointed out that some people - my mother - were better off with dull knives. She had terrible cutting habits.

One of my good friends over the last 30+ years is related to sheriff Pat Garrett. The one who shot Billy the Kid. And his uncle was Jimmy Garrett, a long time Randall knife employee. His back step was poured by the uncle with one step really funny looking. It was/is smooth as glass almost. Yes, he mixed the concrete the way he wanted it. You rich folks use stones, he used concrete! And y'all feel so proud of your 8" stones. His is about 3 feet long! His feeling is he doesn't need all 3 feet, but 2' of it makes a nice working surface. And his method consisted of a glass of water (I understand he never drank the stuff). But he'd spill some on the step and start working. When he was done, you really didn't know he'd used a step. I wouldn't have wanted to enter a sharpness competition against him.

I acutally have a power knife grinding kit. Bought it 9 years ago. Its supposed to have a low speed motor and a wide stone. I'm not sure because I've never unpacked it or plugged it in....

If anyone gets around to buying the book "Razor Edge Sharpening" they make some pretty interesting claims. The authors are consultants to the meat packing industry. And they've examined a bunch of sharp knives. They advise against using a oil slurry. Their studies with a microscope reveal that the pieces of steel and stone that break off become an abrasive slurry that seems to rip pieces out of the edge. They advise to wash the stone, but don't use water or oil as a lubricant. They came to those conclusions by looking at thousands of knives and how they were sharpened. They can tell by looking at an edge how you sharpened it. And according to them, the best edges weren't sharpened with lubricant.

They also suggest the most productive and safest meat cutters are the ones who know how to sharpen their own knives. To them, no one else touches their edges.

My sharpmaker is in the basement, on the end of an old desk. Its only got the one stone mounted. Its like glass. Its set for my pocket knife. And when I walk past it, if I have time, I take a couple of strokes on each side. Its all it takes to bring it back to where I want it. My knife is at least 30 years old now, and it barely shows signs of having been sharpened. Its sharp as I want, but I don't over do the process. And I don't loan my knife to anyone, especially my own wife. Sometimes you can't deny your spouse so I just offer to cut whatever it is she needs. It annoys her, but I enjoy that part. I always offer to buy her another knife. She feels it easier to just borrow mine, or me and mine. She has no idea why I'm so anal about my stupid pocket knife. Except I've explained many times the way to lose a good knife is to loan it. It happened a few times and I was frantic trying to find where she left it. Not hers, no problem for her. After the last incident, where she left it on a picnic table, I stay with my knife.

And be aware that a wife isn't amused by you saying you'd rather loan her out than your knife. The thing is, someone else will be glad to return her...

The bad things said in this thread about stainless doesn't really apply to all stainless. But for the most part, a good carbon steel knife produced 50 or more years ago will take a better edge than anything with "China" stamped on it. All progress isn't good. Or at least in the right direction.

The older I get, the crankier I get. I can't find a 1930 Randall knife, but I have that vintage S&Ws and Winchesters. Best I can find is a 1940s knife, and it'll do. The darn sheath is kind of worn, however. Yes, its sharp.
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