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Old 05-13-2018, 11:53 PM
merl67 merl67 is offline
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Default Colt New Army Navy Revolver

This one spoke to me (some will understand). I i'll be picking it up from my local FFL tomorrow. This one came from a prominent Sunbury Pa citizen. I plan on working up some mild loads in the 7oo-750 fps range with a 158 grn lead swc.
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Old 05-14-2018, 07:34 AM
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Originally Posted by merl67 View Post
This one spoke to me (some will understand). ....

I have heard those voices in my head before, they never shut up until they are getting their way.

A very nice revolver!
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Old 05-14-2018, 08:14 AM
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Merl67,

Just a word of caution in firing it. These guns are almost impossible to repair if something breaks. The're all handfitted
with flat springs. Parts are almost unavailable, as people that
work on them.

I had one rebuilt when parts were available by a Colt warranty
center as a personal favor. The master gunsmith there said
never again. These are similar in trouble to Colt DA lighting
pistols in being troublesome.

These guns are very, very fragile after almost 120 yrs. Your choice, your gun, but I would be very hesitant in firing it.
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Old 05-14-2018, 10:48 AM
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Making up a and firing a few light loads would probably be OK, just so you could say that you had fired it. But I wouldn't make shooting it a habit. What has been said previously is correct. If you break something it may well be unfixable as very few gunsmiths today will touch one.

Some of these revolvers have chambers bored straight through, and therefore .38 Special cartridge cases can be chambered and fired. You can easily check to see if yours is one of those by seeing if a .38 Special case or cartridge will fit.

The original .38 Long Colt cartridge used by the U. S. military at that time used a 17.8 grain load of black powder with a 150 grain bullet. The velocity has been given as 723 ft/sec at 25 feet from a 6" barreled revolver. If I were loading for it, I would use a 148 grain wadcutter bullet (preferably with a hollow base) in a .38 Special case (if it fits) with a charge of no more than 2.5 grains of Bullseye.

Last edited by DWalt; 05-14-2018 at 10:58 AM.
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Old 05-14-2018, 10:57 AM
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While noro‘s point‘s are well-taken, one should not exaggerate the issue. These are comparatively more complex, but you‘re not dealing with a Swiss watch. In my experience they don‘t break as easily as is sometimes claimed. They‘ll also never be rare collectibles, so the “risk” appears manageable.

And if you don‘t shoot it because it might break, the net result is the same as when you can‘t shoot it anymore because it broke. Except you had some fun with it.
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Old 05-14-2018, 11:24 AM
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I just wanted to add a tidbit of Colt information to the subject. In case you wanted to get a letter from Colt for more history on your gun. I am in the process of getting a pre-Woodsman lettered and have been waiting, and waiting. I submitted my request on Feb.6th and was told today Colt archives is running about 100 days to get a letter. Mine will just now be done this week and I may get my letter next week. So do it ASAP if you want a letter. I really like your gun it looks as if it has had good honest wear.
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Old 05-14-2018, 12:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DWalt View Post
Some of these revolvers have chambers bored straight through, and therefore .38 Special cartridge cases can be chambered and fired. You can easily check to see if yours is one of those by seeing if a .38 Special case or cartridge will fit.
I had a case where the suspect was shooting .38 Super +P ammunition in his revolver. From the serial number, the revolver had been made in 1896, and the chambers were bored straight through. You would expect that the cylinder would have at least bulged, or there would have been a catastrophic failure. Nope. The cylinder was fine, but the barrel was split. In case anyone is interested, the suspect died with the Colt revolver in one hand and a sawed-off shotgun in the other. Apparently, he didn't notice that as he got out of his car to rob a gas station, a police car pulled in right behind him.

I have heard of catastrophic failures from shooting .357 Magnum cartridges in the early black powder guns with the straight chambers.
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Old 05-14-2018, 01:18 PM
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If I do shoot it it wont be much at all. I have much better S&W revolvers for extended range time. I do like at least putting a few shots down range in these old ones. All cautions and warnings are duly noted and appreciated. If I do shoot it it will be with the lightest loads possible.
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Old 05-14-2018, 01:28 PM
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....
I have heard of catastrophic failures from shooting .357 Magnum cartridges in the early black powder guns with the straight chambers.
As far as I know, at least the military variant was bored through until the Model 1903, so close to the end.

When S&W came out with the .38 Special K-frame labeled “38 S& SPECIAL & US SERVICE CARTRIDGE”, to emphasize that the .38 Colt fit the Special, Colt supposedly claimed in some ads that the reverse worked also, which it did, just not partcularly safely.

Since .38 Colt brass isn’t that common, folks will often down-load Special cases to the lower pressures. Most commercial .357 cartridges are fortunately too long to fit the cylinder, or we’d hear about more cases, but there are probably some flat-nose loads like wadcutters that are short enough.
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Old 05-14-2018, 02:05 PM
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The New Army, New Navy and the Officers Model Target were also chambered in .38 Special near the end of their production. Those so marked had cylinders with a "step' in them. They also sported barrels with a .357 bore diameter.

The revolvers with the cylinders bored straight through were intended for the .38 Long Colt, which at one time was loaded with an outside lubricated bullet. Early versions were also fitted with .361 diameter bore barrels. The reduction in bore diameter came with the 1903 military version of the revolver and commercial models somewhere long the same time.

This 1906 Officers Model Target is chambered in .38 Special and quite accurate still with standard velocity .38 Specials.

.38 Long Colt brass is more available now. Remington even loads .38 Short Colt these days so Cowboy shooters can use them in .357 Ruger Vaqueros with out bruising their hands, I suppose.
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Old 05-14-2018, 04:04 PM
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I don't know exactly what happened to the revolver barrel diameter, but for sure, the .38 Long Colt used a solid-base inside lubricated bullet of 0.353" diameter from 1892 until 1909 when a change to a hollow-base bullet occurred. The switch to smokeless powder at Frankford Arsenal occurred in 1900, but I do not know the powder type or charge. The only .38 LC cartridges which used the heeled outside-lubricated bullet (0.376" dia.) were the very earliest ones used by the Navy.
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Old 05-14-2018, 04:31 PM
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I had a case where the suspect was shooting .38 Super +P ammunition in his revolver. From the serial number, the revolver had been made in 1896, and the chambers were bored straight through. You would expect that the cylinder would have at least bulged, or there would have been a catastrophic failure. Nope. The cylinder was fine, but the barrel was split. In case anyone is interested, the suspect died with the Colt revolver in one hand and a sawed-off shotgun in the other. Apparently, he didn't notice that as he got out of his car to rob a gas station, a police car pulled in right behind him.
I'm a sucker for a story with a happy ending. Sorry to hear, however, about the Colt barrel.
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Old 05-14-2018, 04:45 PM
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It is certainly possible that .38 Super (or .38 ACP) cartridges could have been used in one of the early Colts. My experience has been that some brands of .38 Super ammunition can be chambered in some .38 Special and .357 Magnum revolvers. But not all brands in all revolvers. As the .38 Super cartridge has a semi-rim, that is enough to provide adequate headspace. Even though the .38 Super bullet is slightly undersize, the cartridge performs OK in .38 Special and .357 revolvers, provided it will fit into the chamber. I'd think that most revolver barrels would not split from using an overpressured cartridge unless there was some bore obstruction or metal defect. The barrel-cylinder gap will normally provide enough pressure venting to prevent that from happening.

Most believe that a .38 S&W cartridge has a diameter too large to fit into a .38 Special chamber. But that is also not necessarily true. Some brands will definitely chamber in some revolvers.

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Old 05-14-2018, 05:13 PM
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I don't know exactly what happened to the revolver barrel diameter, but for sure, the .38 Long Colt used a solid-base inside lubricated bullet of 0.353" diameter from 1892 until 1909 when a change to a hollow-base bullet occurred. The switch to smokeless powder at Frankford Arsenal occurred in 1900, but I do not know the powder type or charge. The only .38 LC cartridges which used the heeled outside-lubricated bullet (0.376" dia.) were the very earliest ones used by the Navy.
"The Colt's double-action revolvers, caliber .38, in service are marked Army, models 1894, 1896, 1901, and 1903. The first model issued was that of 1892, but all the revolvers of that model were altered into model of 1894 by the addition of the locking lever, which is pivoted by its screw in a recess in the left side of the frame and prevents the hammer being cocked until the cylinder is positively closed and locked. The models of 1894 and 1896 are identical. The model of 1901 differs from the previous models in having the butt swivel for lanyard. The model of 1903 differs from the model of 1901 in having the diameter of the bore reduced to insure better accu- racy and in having a smaller and better-shaped handle. The model of 1901 revolvers last made have the thinner stocks"

DESCRIPTION OF THE Colt's Double-Action Revolver, CALIBER .38 WITH RULES FOR MANAGEMENT, MEMORANDA OF TRAJECTORY. AND DESCRIPTION OF AMMUNITION.
APRIL 1, 1905 REVISED OCTOBER 3, 1908 REVISED JUNE 19, 1917

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Old 05-14-2018, 05:25 PM
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I looked it up. The Model 1903 diameter was decreased from 0.363 inch to 0.357 inch to increase accuracy. So apparently all those revolver barrels of earlier manufacture had a 0.363" diameter. Using a 0.353 bullet in a 0.363 barrel seems fairly sloppy.
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Old 05-14-2018, 06:18 PM
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Sloppy is right DWalt. .358 diameter lead semi-wadcutters give no accuracy whatsoever in the barrels over .360 in diameter, will show some tendencies to keyhole in paper targets at 10-15 yards.

I do occasionally shoot two of the three Colt New Army/New Navy revolvers kept here, but mostly for the exercise. The actions are primitive and the double-action trigger is wretched. The revolver feels like its main spring is an "overload" spring out of a '54 GMC 3/4-ton truck.

Hollow base wadcutters will give quite reasonable accuracy with mild charges of Bulls-Eye in the .38 New Army/New Navy.
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Old 05-14-2018, 08:00 PM
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Here's a good article on .38 Colt ammunition. Old outside lubed bullets were a lot closer to .363 than .353.

THE CARTRIDGE COLLECTOR
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Old 05-14-2018, 08:53 PM
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While the Colt .38 LC revolvers in military service were technically replaced by the Colt .45 M1909 New Service revolver (a stopgap for use in the Philippine campaign as the .38 LC revolvers couldn't cut in combat with the Moros) and later by the .45 M1911 pistol, the old revolvers soldiered on through WWI. However, they were normally relegated to use only in rear areas where they weren't likely to see combat action. Even after WWI, the .38 Colts continued in use into the 1920s by various state guard units. Most .38 LC ammunition for them was purchased before, during, and after WWI by the Army from commercial sources as Frankford Arsenal had better things to do than making obsolete cartridges for an obsolete military revolver. Military .38 LC ammunition having Remington, Winchester, Peters, and U. S. Cartridge headstamps is fairly common in collector circles. The ammunition was commercially loaded in the U.S. until around the late 1970s and I have several boxes of Winchester .38 LC ammunition I bought at that time in my collection. I think there are still some small custom loaders still selling .38 LC. It is fairly simple to make it yourself - just cut .38 Special cases shorter. But few need any.

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Old 05-14-2018, 09:36 PM
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Lyman mould 358070 make a 150 grain round nose hollow base bullet well suited to the .38 Long Colt. I load them over 17 grains Goex FFFg black powder and a card wad. They shoot well in my Colt M1901 (.361 bore) and M1903 (.357 bore) Army revolvers. A friend tried them in his Model 1877 but they were not as accurate as his black power loads using the 150 grain round nose, heeled bullet he casts from a Lyman 358160.

Both of those moulds are long out of production, but a couple of commercial casters are making a suitable heeled bullet.

.38 Colt and .41 Colt have been loaded with both hollow base and heel bullets. Some guns seem to work OK with either one and some show a preference for one or the other. Having a buddy with "other" type mould a couple of Lightnings and an SAA in .41 Colt that is what we have observed .
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Old 05-14-2018, 10:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by merl67 View Post
If I do shoot it it wont be much at all. I have much better S&W revolvers for extended range time. I do like at least putting a few shots down range in these old ones. All cautions and warnings are duly noted and appreciated. If I do shoot it it will be with the lightest loads possible.
Find someone to video you shooting it, and you can re-live it every time you watch it. Cool gun.
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Old 05-15-2018, 10:04 AM
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Quote:
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While the Colt .38 LC revolvers in military service were technically replaced by the Colt .45 M1909 New Service revolver (a stopgap for use in the Philippine campaign as the .38 LC revolvers couldn't cut in combat with the Moros) and later by the .45 M1911 pistol, the old revolvers soldiered on through WWI. However, they were normally relegated to use only in rear areas where they weren't likely to see combat action. Even after WWI, the .38 Colts continued in use into the 1920s by various state guard units. Most .38 LC ammunition for them was purchased before, during, and after WWI by the Army from commercial sources as Frankford Arsenal had better things to do than making obsolete cartridges for an obsolete military revolver. Military .38 LC ammunition having Remington, Winchester, Peters, and U. S. Cartridge headstamps is fairly common in collector circles. The ammunition was commercially loaded in the U.S. until around the late 1970s and I have several boxes of Winchester .38 LC ammunition I bought at that time in my collection. I think there are still some small custom loaders still selling .38 LC. It is fairly simple to make it yourself - just cut .38 Special cases shorter. But few need any.
I picked up a M1909 a couple of months ago. Great piece, lots of fun to shoot. Very impressive, can see why the military used it over the .38 Special until the M1911's came on line for issue.
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Old 05-15-2018, 03:19 PM
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My two M1909s. They don't show up very often, most never made it back from the Philippines.
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Old 05-15-2018, 03:58 PM
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My two M1909s. They don't show up very often, most never made it back from the Philippines.

Check your PM's. Don't want to hijack this thread.
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Old 05-15-2018, 04:29 PM
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Awesome Revolver
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Old 05-15-2018, 04:52 PM
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They are all hand fitted, but not at all unusual for a turn of that Century handgun.
Flat springs, sure, just like the other Colts and a couple of the springs are very fragile and of complicated shape. The cylinder bolt spring for example.
The DA strut/sear had orig a small fragile flat spring too but was changed to a little coil spring. The strut is a differnt part if using the coil spring but you can mod the orig flat spring part if you need to.
The cyl latch uses a coil spring and always was AFAIK.
The main spring is a single leaf flat spring not unlike a S*W. Not the later V shape so common in the Colt DA designs.
A separate spring powers the rebound arm. That arm causes a lot of the hang ups in smooth operation of these. The parts are just plain worn and any replacements are pretty much the same being stripped from beat up revolvers of little value.
Many parts are complicated shapes but most any can be made or rebuilt if you have a mind to.
The guns themselves won't self destruct upon use if still well fitted up and proper ammo used. If they do break down a decent 'smith should be able to repair.
I guess there is a shortage of decent smiths.
A parts changers project they are not. They require gunsmithing work but that's what gunsmiths are supposed to be able to do.

Nice looking Colt..
What does the inscription say on the bottom?,,can't quite read it..
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Old 05-16-2018, 02:18 AM
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Nice looking Colt..
What does the inscription say on the bottom?,,can't quite read it..
DR F E Drumheller the research I have done says he was a Dentist and a mayor in Pennsylvania which is where this Colt came from.
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Old 05-16-2018, 08:51 AM
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These revolvers always intrigued me because of their history.
First swing out cylinder, Spanish-American War, US Army issue,
etc. Their structure is basically solid when used with the proper ammo.

However, it was almost impossible to find parts and someone to work on them back in the 1970's. Add 50 yrs to the time frame, and I imagine its much worse. Modern gunsmiths don't want to invest their time in repairing relics, that require considerable skills. They can possibly do 10 repairs in the time it would take to restore one of these to operating condition, and where do you find one? And at what cost?

At a time when Colt had local warranty centers, I had to beg the master gunsmith to repair one. He virtually had to recreate the springs and handfit it to time correctly. It was a labor of love paid for by a young kid. He also told me to never bring him one again

just wanted to pass on my experience to the OP.
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Old 05-16-2018, 11:25 AM
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More ol' ratty Colts of the type.

Ratty New Navy .32 WCF from 1906-7


U. S. Model 1901 .38


New Navy .41 Long Colt from 1901



Now the Model 1909 is a different breed of cat. Of much superior design, it still can "serve the purpose." The Model 1909 here was purchased along with four additional Model 1909s from the San Antonio Arsenal in 1920. The other four revolvers served to arm nightwatchmen at a plant. This one was brought home to serve the family of the purchaser.
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Old 05-16-2018, 02:44 PM
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I have read about several M1909s being obtained as surplus from some large bank which were used by bank guards back before WWII. I don't remember where the bank was, but Cleveland sticks in my mind as a possibility. The one in your picture is the most pristine I have seen. One of mine is fairly close but a few points less. It is now on loan as a museum display. I know nothing about the histories of either of mine, nor did their previous owners. Except that they were probably among those which stayed stateside.

Among the civilian Colt A&Ns, I'd say I have seen more chambered in .41 LC than any other caliber. I had one of those long ago, but never fired it. And it was definitely in what could be charitably called "shooter condition." Despite its well-used condition, it seemed fully functional so I assume that its mechanism was fairly sturdy.

Last edited by DWalt; 05-16-2018 at 02:57 PM.
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Old 05-16-2018, 03:03 PM
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I have read about several M1909s being obtained as surplus from some large bank which were used by bank guards back before WWII. I don't remember where the bank was, but Cleveland sticks in my mind as a possibility. The one in your picture is the most pristine I have seen. One of mine is fairly close but a few points less. I know nothing about the histories of either of mine, nor did their previous owners. Except that they were probably among those which stayed stateside.
Like DWalt, I have read the same stories. I have looked at tons of American Rifleman magazines from over the 30's, 40's, 50's and early 60's, and never can I remember seeing the 1909's for sale.

Mine has been rebuilt(?) with a Colt New Service marked barrel. It is appropriate since the 1909 is basically a New Service to begin with. This just means I don't feel bad about shooting a true collector's piece.
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Old 05-16-2018, 03:14 PM
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I once had a 1909 that had had the barrel shortened to 4". It also had an addition 4 digit serial number stamped on it, indicating it had been overhauled in an armory.
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Old 05-16-2018, 03:25 PM
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"The Model 1909 here was purchased along with four additional Model 1909s from the San Antonio Arsenal in 1920."

You are probably aware of this, but much of the San Antonio Arsenal still exists just south of downtown in the King William district. It is now the headquarters of the H-E-B supermarket chain.
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Old 05-16-2018, 04:00 PM
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A famous antique gun dealer located in Texas currently has a M1909 described as formerly belonging to the Cleveland Trust Co. listed for sale. $3995.

Plus this M1909 (not the same) from a 2010 auction description:

"Manufactured in 1911 on government contract, inspected by Rinaldo Carr and Walter Penfield, and later sold as surplus. Blade front and notch rear sights. Barrel has the standard one line caliber marking on the left, the two line, three date patent markings on the top, and "UNITED STATES PROPERTY", "P", and "R.A.C." on the underside. The frame is marked with the Rampant Colt and long "C" and is equipped with a checkered hammer, smooth trigger, "K" marked square cylinder latch, and checkered ejector rod head, along with "R.A.C." and "W.G.P" on the right side, "CTC Co" on either side, and "CTC" on the left over the Rampant Colt. Notes from the consignor indicate CTC as the Cleveland Trust Company, established in 1894 and active to the 1990's, when it merged with Society Corporation. Smooth walnut grips with "R.A.C." markings on the bases, a lanyard ring and "U.S./ ARMY/ MODEL/ 1909/ No/ 43/ 734" on the butt.
BBL: 5 1/2 inch round
Stock:
Gauge: 45 Long Colt
Finish: blue
Grips: walnut
Serial Number: 43734
Condition: Excellent, with 95% plus of the bright original blue finish, showing bright wear along the edges, a brown patina on the grip straps, scattered areas of gray patina, and minor handling marks overall. A tiny amount of cold blue has been applied to the inside of the trigger guard. Grips are very fine, with pressure dents and light scratches. Mechanically excellent."

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Old 05-16-2018, 05:33 PM
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"Sleuthed out" that $3995 Colt Model 1909. It is nice. While the Cleveland Trust Co. ownership is part of its history, it's a shame they so enthusiastically "thwacked" their markings on it, on both sides.

We pass the old San Antonio Arsenal when going to the Guenther House for lunch while in San Antonio.
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Old 05-16-2018, 07:57 PM
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In case no one has noted it here, a friend in HS had a 1903 Colt .38 and we discovered it'd accept .357 Magnum cartridges.

The chambers weren't bored with shoulders to preclude that.
Obviously, this is a very dangerous thing if someone fired these much more powerful cartridges in an old Colt .38.
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Old 05-16-2018, 08:18 PM
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I won't be shootong this one anytime soon. The bore is perfect and action is too, despite the lack of finish on this one I doubt think it was shot much. The main reason I won't be shootong it my cast lead semiwadcutters fall through the bore , they measure right at .358 so not much to be gained in shooting it with those
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Old 05-16-2018, 08:31 PM
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.357 wadcutters with hollow bases will work better in oversized barrels.
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Old 05-17-2018, 12:31 PM
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My U. S. Model 1901 seen in post No. 28 above shoots 148 grain hollow-base wadcutters a treat. It's bore slugged to measure .362-363; I can't now recall which.

Ah ... .363 is the bore diameter. I went and fetched my reloading notes.

Here's the sum total of reloading efforts undertaken since acquiring the revolver for ... seems like $60 at a Fort Worth gun show in the very late 1970s.

Take it with a grain of salt and carefully work up your own handloading efforts.

Using Winchester .38 Long Colt cases:

148 grain hollow base wadcutter, 3.0 grains Bulls-Eye: 752 fps

148 grain hollow base wadcutter, 4.0 grains Unique: 753 fps

158 grain .358 diameter lead semi-wadcutter, 4.4 grains Unique: 777 fps (this was the load that was a total bust - 12 inch groups at 15 yards with keyholing evident).

For my purposes, on the rare occasions when the Model 1901 is taken out for "exercise" I've mostly come to resorting to use a box or two of regular ol' .38 Special hollow base wadcutter handloads rather than to bother with making up batches of handloads in .38 Long Colt cases. I put 'em up with 2.8 grains of Bulls-Eye for use in accurate .38 Special revolvers around here. The .38 Special length is amply contained within the chamber. .38 Special HWBC handloads chamber perfectly and are very mild.

If it hoo-doodles one to use .38 Special brass for his .38 Long Colt handloads then use the same load in the .38 Long Colt case. The .38 Special wadcutter handload with 2.8 grains of Bulls-Eye hasn't been chronographed from the Colt Model 1901, but the same load makes 693 fps from a 6-inch Colt Officer's Model Match.

Not to advocate using .38 Special ammunition in a .38 Long Colt chambered revolver but a powder puff handload in a .38 Special case is a "field expedient" way to use the .38 Long Colt revolver.

While we're at it, some factory .38 Long Colt ammunition has been chronograph tested.

An old box of Western 150 grain lead ammunition clocked 743 fps.

A fresh (at that time) box of Winchester 150 grain lead ammunition proved to be more plodding at 638 fps.

These were derived from 10-shot averages and all fired through the Colt Model 1901 with 6-inch barrel.

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Old 05-17-2018, 03:33 PM
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"An old box of Western 150 grain lead ammunition clocked 743 fps"
Which is only slightly greater than the given ballistics of the old .38 LC black powder load (pre-1900). If I had a military A&N revolver I would use .38 Special cases. Due to the larger capacity of the .38 Special case, any given .38 LC load would produce a lower MV.
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Old 05-17-2018, 03:47 PM
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I have found that heeled bullets work well in those old Colt revolvers.

.38 Colt .375 dia 150gr heel seated double cavity bullet mould
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Old 05-17-2018, 04:14 PM
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I have found that heeled bullets work well in those old Colt revolvers.
No doubt they would. But there is no good way to crimp the case mouth into the heel to keep the bullet from jumping out under recoil. You can sort of roll a crimp by hand with a crude tool (I used a wood chisel) but it takes a while to do and the results are iffy. One time I used epoxy which at least kept the bullet in the case. Put a dab of epoxy onto the heel, insert the heel into the case, then twist the bullet to smear the epoxy around. There may well be a crimping tool made for such purposes, but I have not seen one.

BTW - If anyone has ever seen a (very) old box of Winchester RF ammo, it will likely make a reference on the label to "Stetson's Patent". That patent covers a method of crimping a case into a heeled bullet. Historically the Russians came up with the idea for the inside-lubricated handgun bullet with the .44 Russian cartridge. They recognized the obvious shortcomings of cartridges with heeled bullets.

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Old 05-17-2018, 04:44 PM
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Seemed to take Colt longer to see the obvious when it comes to heeled bullet shortcomings.

I have a .32 Colt die set and a batch of heeled bullets from GAD. Also have heeled bullets for the .41 Long Colt on hand. Haven't explored whether they can be assembled into ammunition yet though.
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Old 05-17-2018, 05:04 PM
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I modified a set of M2 blasting crimpers when I first started...



...but the Lee factory crimp die is the answer.



The results are nicely uniform.

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Old 05-17-2018, 07:39 PM
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Quote:
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Seemed to take Colt longer to see the obvious when it comes to heeled bullet shortcomings.

I have a .32 Colt die set and a batch of heeled bullets from GAD. Also have heeled bullets for the .41 Long Colt on hand. Haven't explored whether they can be assembled into ammunition yet though.
Well, the .32 Colt and .38 Colt started life in conversions of cap and ball revolvers. Those bore sizes kinda carried on as did heeled bullets.

Old West Bullets has the crimp dies and the heeled bullet moulds you need to make life simple.

I have been a satisfied user for a few years now. Their stuff makes loading .32, .38 and .41 Colt much simpler and more accurate.
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