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Old 05-22-2020, 10:42 PM
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Default The Very First Mauser, the 1871

I ran across a gun that I have had kind of a love affair with ever since I first saw one many years ago, the Model 1871 Mauser rifle. This was the first design by the Mauser Brothers and led to every design afterwards that we all know. The 1871 was a single shot, the later 1871/84 was a tube magazine version of this gun, and what was amazing is how these guns saw service well past the adoption of better and newer designs. During WWI the Model 1871's were present in Africa where the German backed local troops and police were armed with them.

The Mauser 71's were in the Boer War, Balkan Wars, and during the Boxer Rebellion, the Chinese troops were armed with the 1871 facing off against German troops armed with the 1871/84. The last real known use of the 1871 was when some were handed out to the Volkssturm in the last ditch defense of Berlin.

This particular gun was made in Amberg in 1878, has a really nice bore and rifling, The metal and wood were cleaned at some point, but that's fine, I plan on shooting it every so often. The serial numbers all match except for a couple of parts, which considering everything down to the screw heads is numbered, is a feat. The buttplate doesn't match, which sadly is where the stamping would have been of what regiment the gun was assigned to.

One thing about this gun is that it is HUGE. It's a good three inches longer than my 1891 Mosin Nagant and a couple pounds heavier. I'm trying to imagine what lugging this thing around a pre-WWI battlefield must have been like. I ordered a box of ammo for it, which is pricey, but I also got a set of dies so I can at least reload the brass for it. The quality of these guns is amazing, and you can see the early start of the famous Mauser bolt and the flag type safety.















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Old 05-22-2020, 10:44 PM
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One of the milsurps i don't have. Nice find.
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Old 05-22-2020, 10:45 PM
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That’s a very cool old rifle and looks like it’s in great shape too. Thanks for sharing
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Old 05-22-2020, 11:20 PM
merl67 merl67 is offline
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I had a small Mauser collection for a number of years that included one of those I've never seen a rifle so finely finished as one of those even the screws have the last two digits of the the serial number on the head. The gun and its predecessor the 71/84 repeater were light years ahead of anything we had at the time these are light compared to a fully loaded 71/84. I made the first rounds I ever shot from reformed 45-90 brass much cheaper than Betrum brass. If you do decide to reload Trailboss is the way to go. I had one of all the major design changes except the 1889 Belgium never could run one down. Enjoy that one they are a work of art
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Old 05-23-2020, 12:42 AM
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For anyone that hasn't seen it, some very interesting history on the 1871:

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Old 05-23-2020, 01:21 AM
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What a great score! Three in. longer than the Mosin! Wait till you put a bayonet on it.
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Old 05-23-2020, 02:26 AM
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What a great score! Three in. longer than the Mosin! Wait till you put a bayonet on it.
I almost forgot I had a bayonet for mine more sword than bayonet. It would give a soldier plenty of reach to dismount a man on a horse.
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Old 05-23-2020, 06:48 AM
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Default Bayonet or Sword?

Actually, some of the early bolt action military rifles were equipped with outsized sword/bayonets that served a dual purpose. Dismounted, they were short swords that, owing to their short length for a sword, were probably used for slashing.

Thanks for posting and sharing. The rifle would be a welcome addition to any collection.
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Old 05-23-2020, 06:55 AM
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What caliber is it?
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Old 05-23-2020, 08:40 AM
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What caliber is it?
It's 11 x 60mm Mauser, otherwise known as .43 Mauser and uses a .446 bullet around 370-380 grains.
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Old 05-23-2020, 08:47 AM
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Many of the 71s were later converted to the 71/84. I once had an unconverted 71, at that time CIL was still making .43 Mauser ammo. I also had (and still have) a Portuguese 8mm Kropatschek rifle made by Steyr, which is virtually identical to the 71/84 except for the caliber. Most of those saw hard colonial use. I have thought about restoring mine (it's in mediocre condition but not too badly abused), but one of those projects I haven't gotten around to doing, and probably never will.

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Old 05-23-2020, 08:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David LaPell View Post
It's 11 x 60mm Mauser, otherwise known as .43 Mauser and uses a .446 bullet around 370-380 grains.
Do you have a picture of the cartridge? Maybe compared to a round of something we know? Also does that compare to any of the modern calibers?
Thanks
Ed
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Old 05-23-2020, 08:58 AM
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Very nice indeed David!! The markings and stampings alone are of great interest on these vintage military arms. I imagine the Model 1871 is a lot more difficult to locate for the collector. thanks for the great pics and the story.
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Old 05-23-2020, 09:36 AM
Ivan the Butcher Ivan the Butcher is online now
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Quote:
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Do you have a picture of the cartridge? Maybe compared to a round of something we know? Also does that compare to any of the modern calibers?
Thanks
Ed
Think 45-70 only a 1/4" longer and in 44 caliber with a slight bottleneck instead of a tapper.
Depending on wadding used about 65-85 grains of FFg powder.

Ivan
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Old 05-23-2020, 09:55 AM
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Quote:
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Think 45-70 only a 1/4" longer and in 44 caliber with a slight bottleneck instead of a tapper.
Depending on wadding used about 65-85 grains of FFg powder.

Ivan
Here's some information from Barnes "Cartridges of the World."
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Old 05-23-2020, 10:03 AM
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I had a 91 a few years ago. Came with Dies too. Was in very good shape. I never got around to shooting it. Of course keep dies in case I get another.
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Old 05-23-2020, 10:15 AM
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Quote:
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Do you have a picture of the cartridge? Maybe compared to a round of something we know? Also does that compare to any of the modern calibers?
Thanks
Ed
43 Mauser 45-70 223
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Old 05-23-2020, 11:37 AM
Wyatt Burp Wyatt Burp is offline
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My dad bought one in the 50s and it was the most prominent gun in the gun rack growing up. Serial #6969, King of Prussia stamped, made itís way to South America then to Oakland, CA where my dad wound up with it. I eventually sold it to a Mauser collector. It had a visually perfect bore, very nice wood, and was in the white with no rust. I still have the full box of paper patched German ammo for it, though itís flat point with the box marked 71/84 for the repeater version of the gun.
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Old 05-23-2020, 04:39 PM
2152hq 2152hq is offline
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LEE made (still makes?) loading dies in 43 Mauser. Must have been a flood of 71's at some point not too far in the past but I don't really recall any.

Neat old rifles. Not often found anymore in full Military condition. Usually they've been chopped and sporterized at least some.
Mauser and some of the best gunsmiths of the time did make very nice sporters on these as well.

I never had one but had a nice Steyr Kropeschek (sp) Long Rifle. Those I do remember being imported in large numbers and sold in 3 or four versions in magazine ads (Ye Old Hunter?).
Had dies (RCBS) for that one but never got around to loading for it. Chould'a, Should'a hung on to it.

Beautiful rifle!


Added
Checked LEE website and they still offer 43MAuser dies. 2 die set w/SH.
Limited Production status.
$42 retail
Most reloading supply places price them just below $40,,but out of stock usually.

Last edited by 2152hq; 05-23-2020 at 04:47 PM. Reason: added
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Old 05-23-2020, 10:08 PM
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Quote:
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I never had one but had a nice Steyr Kropeschek (sp) Long Rifle. Those I do remember being imported in large numbers and sold in 3 or four versions in magazine ads (Ye Old Hunter?).
Had dies (RCBS) for that one but never got around to loading for it. Chould'a, Should'a hung on to it.
As I remember the 8mm Kropatscheks were offered in 2 styles of long rifle and two styles of carbine. There were many of them that came into the country back in the early 1970s, as antiques. I believe all of them were made pre-1899. Finding ammunition or cases is difficult. There is some old military blank ammo around, and you can salvage them for cases. I have drilled out the cases to take shotshell primers and use Pyrodex with regular 8mm bullets.

Last edited by DWalt; 05-23-2020 at 10:09 PM.
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