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Old 09-02-2009, 02:23 PM
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Default Winchester Model 69 and 69A rifles **UPDATED 12/03/12**





I just finished a rather detailed reply to a question in another thread regarding Winchester 69A rifles. I thought I'd copy it into a thread of its own for those of you who might have one of these fine rifles from yesteryear. Here's as much information as I have:

It was a cold day in January, 1950, and I remember it like it was yesterday. It was my 11th birthday, and my dad and I had picked out a brand new Winchester 69A rifle the week before. We had gone half and half on it, splitting the $24 cost of the rifle. Dad figured that if I really wanted a rifle that much, I’d have to earn at least part of it. The long box with the Winchester logo was in the back seat of his 1947 Studebaker when he came home from work, and I had my very first rifle. Today, those carefully crafted and accurate rifles are in high demand on the used gun market and are genuine classics.

The original Model 69 bolt action rifle was announced Jan. 1, 1935. The rifle was designed at the factory to be an intermediate-cost rifle suitable for sport and target work. It was to be chambered for .22 long rifle, long, and short rimfire cartridges interchangeably. First shipments began on March 15, 1935. It had a cocking knob much like the 1903 Springfield on the rear of the bolt, and cocked on closing. The cocking knob doubled as a safety by pulling it back and twisting it. A rebounding lock was incorporated in August of 1935 to make the rifle suitable for export to Canada in compliance with Canadian regulations. The top rifle illustrated is a Model 69, which I estimate was made in 1936. In October of 1937, the takedown screw was made flush with the stock instead of projecting somewhat, and the walnut stock was modified a bit with a semi-beavertail forearm and a more pronounced pistol grip. All stocks had a composition butt plate with the Winchester logo molded in.

In 1937, as an option, the Model 69s could be ordered with either 2 3/4-power or 5-power scopes. The scope bases were affixed to the gun, but the scope was not mounted from the factory. It came dismounted in the same packing box as the rifle. These scoped Model 69 rifles were discontinued in 1941 as supplies were exhausted.

The rifle was redesigned and then modified around December of 1937 to cock on opening, eliminating the cocking knob. The new bolt gave a very fast lock time, one of the best for rifles of that era, or any era for that matter. A safety lever was added alongside the bolt on the right side. The standard barrel was 25" long, somewhat heavier than that on the original 69. Weight was about 5 pounds. The gun remained essentially unchanged until it was discontinued in 1963. This modified rifle was designated the Model 69A. None were serial numbered throughout production. Total production of 69s and 69As was 355,363.

Several different versions of the Model 69A were offered. The standard grade had a barrel-mounted open rear sight, adjustable with a sliding elevator piece, and a simple dovetailed bead front sight. This was the model that my father and I bought. It was the most economical type. Equipped with the Winchester 80A stamped rear peep sight and hooded front sight utilizing a stamped sheet metal ramp, the cost was a bit higher. The second rifle illustrated is one of these rifles. I estimate it was made in 1957.

The target model was authorized on Dec. 26, 1940, and had the fully adjustable Winchester 80A stamped rear peep sight and a blade front sight. It was equipped with a military-style sling. The match model, introduced at the same time in 1940, was drilled and tapped for, and used, the commercial Lyman 57EW target micrometer rear sight. The front sight was the standard No. 93 blade. There was no provision for an open sight on the barrel (no dovetail cut there). It came equipped with sling swivels and a leather military-style sling. Sling swivels could be special ordered or installed on other models as well. The first sling swivels and slings were one inch in width. This changed in 1947 to 1 ” swivels and slings for both the target and match models. Some match models were stamped with a "W" and assembly numbers in the wood on the bottom of the pistol grip. All target and match models were chambered for .22 LR only, and were so marked on the barrel. A six-pointed star stamped on the muzzle crown indicated a six-groove barrel. A very rare model, beginning in the mid-1950s, was the “jr. target shooter’s special.” This was a standard 69A with a blocked open sight dovetail, a commercial rear peep sight, a No. 93 front blade, and a forward sling swivel only. It had the standard (S, L, LR) chambering.

About 1954, the receivers were grooved for tip-off scope mounts. These grooved rifles command a premium price today. About this time, some of the standard guns were drilled and tapped for commercial micrometer sights. There was no cutout in the stock for such sights; the owner would have to modify the stock if they were to be used. This was easy enough to do with a few strokes of a file. About the same time, the bolt handle was swept to the rear and the trigger was grooved. Chromed firing pin spring caps and then chromed bolts were introduced in 1957. Chromed trigger guards and magazine dash plates were used in the early 1960s.

Several different styles of stock were used over the years, differing in the width and length of the fore-end. Some early ones had a very abrupt squared-off fore-end. Somewhat later ones (before approximately 1954) were tapered forward at the nose. These were a bit shorter than the others. Later, some were thin and rounded at the nose, and some were very thick and somewhat squared off, similar to those seen on most target guns. All target and match rifle stocks had a special relief cut on the left side for the specific rear sight used.

An outgrowth of the Model 69A was the Model 75 target rifle and Model 75 sporter. Both had the same action as the Model 69A; the bolts are identical. I have a Model 75 sporter made in 1956 and it's the most accurate .22 I own. The barrel is 23.5", shorter than the 25-inch barrel found on the 69A. Also, the barrel is marked for .22 long rifle cartridges only. This meant that the chambering and rifling were designed for maximum accuracy using the .22 LR round. The non-target/match 69As use compromise chambering and rifling to also accommodate longs and shorts. In spite of this, the accuracy difference is small between these rifles. The Model 75 targets and sporters were discontinued in 1958; all were serial numbered.

There was also a Model 72, which was essentially a Model 69A with an under-barrel tube feed. The bolts on these are a bit different to accommodate the changed feed system. The later Model 72A had some re-designed parts, notably a solid lifter; the previous one was split. These rifles had no pull-weight adjustment screw as is found on the 69As. A single shot version, the Model 47, had no provision for a magazine. On these, the safety lever automatically engaged when the bolt opened and had to be released each time to fire after the bolt was closed.

There were several types of magazines. The standard mag fed five long rifles, longs and shorts interchangeably. There was a five-shot .22 short mag also, which had an internal spacer insert at the front of the magazine. The single shot mag (actually a scooped-out flexible platform at the top of what appeared as a standard mag) was principally used for the Model 52 and Model 75 target rifles, but it would also work in the 69, the 69A and the Model 75 sporter. This was called the "single loading adapter." A 10-shot curved magazine which projected below the stock was also made, and took all lengths of cartridges. Magazines with an underlined "W" on the base are modern non-Winchester reproductions. Genuine Winchester mags will have the company stamp on the baseplate.

I have what may be the one and only Model 69A Deluxe. It was specially ordered by an old gentleman who lived near the Winchester factory in New Haven, Connecticut. It has a pistol grip topped by a black plastic cap with the Winchester name on it, and has checkering on the forestock and the pistol grip. The finish on the stock is superb. It has a straight bolt handle, a grooved trigger, and is grooved for scope mounts. It has the standard open sights. There is no serial number except a couple of hash marks stamped on the right receiver opening rail, and one on the receiver itself. I have never heard of another, although some might exist. A collector bought the rifle from the old man's estate. It appears unfired since its estimated date of manufacture in 1954. It's sure not a "gunsmith project" but appears factory made in all respects.

The main aggravation I’ve found with the 69A is the lack of an overtravel adjustment. The letoff is crisp, but there's a lot of overtravel. A trigger shoe with a limiting screw can solve that problem. Weight of pull is adjustable to some degree; there is a screw cap over the trigger spring that can be moved up and down to alter the pull weight. An even nicer pull in the 2-3 lb. range is possible with some careful gunsmithing.

As mentioned, about 1954, the bolt handle was changed from straight to swept back, somewhat like that on the Model 70 rifle. It looked nicer, but as the bolt handle was two-piece, the rotational leverage exerted on the swept bolt knob tended to loosen the joint at the root of the bolt handle with use. This made the bolt handle wobbly. It can be fixed with staking or soldering.

Another small problem is the pin that retains the firing pin spring cap tended to work out to one side, and had to be tapped back in place as one saw it project at the rear of the bolt. Winchester replaced that pin in later production with one which had a reduced-diameter section in the middle. The spring fit into that section and secured the pin from “walking.”

Most used 69As in decent shape today are worth from $250 to $400 depending on condition, originality, and presence or lack of scope grooves.

These were fine rifles, suitable for adults as well as youngsters. They were very accurate, simple to disassemble and clean, and quite rugged. I've had one for over 60 years and it will still shoot rings around modern rifles of any make. The old-time quality of the 69A has only recently begun to be appreciated, and it has become a very sought-after classic .22 rifle.


Hope you find this information helpful.

John
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Last edited by PALADIN85020; 03-16-2013 at 07:05 PM. Reason: updated information
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Old 09-02-2009, 03:31 PM
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Wow !! Nicely written. I have 2 of them, very good shooters.
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Old 09-02-2009, 03:34 PM
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Default Winchester Model 69A Rifle

Hi:
Very interesting information.
I have a Model 69A Target Model and a Model 72.
Thanks for posting.
Jimmy
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Old 09-02-2009, 03:52 PM
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John,

Thank you very much for sharing your knowledge on these rifles. I just pulled my grandfather's out of the safe to look it over. It is marked as a Model 69 and not a 69A as I had misremembered. It's probably a fairly early example since it does cock on closing and does have a cocking knob that also functions as a safety. It does have a rear peep sight and a hooded bead front sight. I also looked at both 5 round magazines, I had mistakenly thought that there were 3. One is definately for shorts with a shorter follower and spacer at the front of the magazine. Both are stamped with the Winchester name and patent dates on the baseplates.

I have a 4 year old daughter and I had long thought about teaching her to shoot with this rifle. I am starting to reconsider that though. To close the bolt on mine does take an effort and I'm not sure that she has the hand strength to do it on her own. I've probably got 2 more years until I need to make that decision. As much as I would like to, I don't think she's ready for a trip to the range yet.

Thanks again for sharing.

Frank
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Old 09-02-2009, 04:44 PM
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Nice write-up, John. I have one also with scope dovetail. It was purchased in Indianapolis at Vonnegut's Hdw 1956, (owner a relative of author Kurt Vonnegut). It is still the best, and favorite, .22 rifle I own. My S&W m41 has to be my fav .22 pistol.
clipper1
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Old 09-02-2009, 06:57 PM
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Thanks for the write-up.

I have a 67 and a 68. I keep telling myself they NEED a 69 to keep them company.
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Old 09-02-2009, 07:31 PM
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I too am a fan of Winchester and Remington rimfire bolt rifles.

I've been looking for a reasonably priced 69A for a while now.

Great write up!
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Old 09-02-2009, 07:49 PM
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Great write up,,Thanks for posting.
I've owned a few over the years and they were all nice rifles. Only one was a Mod69 if I remember correctly, the others 69A's.
I took a couple that had been already butchered with D&T holes and other alterations & refinishing attempts and made them into custom sporters. There's alot of wood in those factory stocks and they can be reshaped into a really nice profile. Plug holes, checkering, ramp front site, steel butt plate & cap, sink the mag plate & trigger guard ends into the wood, etc. Alot of work for little return but it was fun back then.

Had one that used to pierce the brass upon firing once in a while and spit some gas and brass back at you. Some work on the firing pin tip profile fixed that easily. The sharper than necessary tip was probably another persons attempt at improving something that didn't need any.
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Old 09-02-2009, 09:31 PM
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I am a great fan of Winchester 22s and your write up was very good. You're right in the fact that there are many small changes and differences in the 69 and 69As over the years. There is a long running thread on the 69s and their differences on rimfire central.I have two, a Dual Sight 69 that has British proofs and a 69A With Peeps and leather sling. The 69A though is not an actual Match Target, because it is chambered for all .22 short, long and long rifle. The true Match Target is chambered for only .22 long rifle and has a different number of lands and grooves. Here is a picture of my Dual Sight 69, the second picture shows the British Proofs. It's got about as much writing on it as a Ruger pistol.





Plese post any other .22 information you have, .22s are my passion.
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Old 09-03-2009, 12:31 PM
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wundudnee,

Interesting additional information. My model 75 sporter, which is a derivative of the Model 69A, is just a tad more accurate than any 69A I own (I have 11). I suspect you hit on the answer. The Model 75 is chambered and rifled like its big brother, the target rifle. So it must be that the chamber is designed for .22LR only, and the rifling specifically for .22 LR. (Update: I just checked, the barrel is marked ".22 Long Rifle", not LR, L, and S) That rifle, scoped, will shoot cloverleaves at 25 yards, while the 69As typically have a tad more open group.

Gun Tests ran an article recently comparing the 69A with a Marlin 80-DL and a Marlin 980S. Firing five shot groups from a machine rest at 50 yards, the results were:

Ely Match 40 grain: 1.4 in
Federal Classic 40 grain: 1.0 in
Remington Yellow Jacket 33 gr. HP TC: .8 in
CCI Velocitor 40 gr. HP: .7 in

For three of the four loads, all the other rifles turned in larger groups than the old 69A. The 69A used an old .75 inch B-4 Weaver, while the other rifles used more modern scopes. Not bad for an old timer!

I have dolled up one of my 69As with a Fajen sporter stock, complete with Monte Carlo comb and checkering. It feels more like a Model 70. I equipped it with a ramped front sight, obtained on eBay, so it now looks a lot more elegant. I also worked the trigger down to 2 lbs and installed a trigger shoe positioned to limit overtravel. When I show it to folks, they can't figure out what it is until they see the stamping on the barrel. The barreled action likes the stock, and it's one of the more accurate 69As I own.

Here's a shot of my "product improved" 69A. I rather like the way it turned out:

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Old 09-04-2009, 09:07 PM
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Nice job Paladin!!
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Old 09-05-2009, 05:07 PM
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Good info Palidan!
I've had a 69A since I was a kid, my wife and my son shoot it now.
I found a 52B that I shoot more now.
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Old 09-05-2009, 05:45 PM
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I have a Winchester 62A, and I love it.
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:32 PM
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Hi
I'm new to he forum, but did not resist jumping in on this one.

I still own a mod. 69A, the version with a Lyman 57 peep sight, a dovetailed barrel (no sight, dovetail covered by a factory installed block) and a grooved receiver. Curved 5 shot magazine good for S, L and LR ammo.

I bought this rifle around 1964, shot it a lot when I was younger, but haven't shot it for years; most likely will not shoot it again, as our politicians have made sure that most recent laws concerning the use of guns (even airguns) make that almost impossible

I agree with everything witten about the 69A (the trigger backlash, too...). It was a fine, no frills, rugged and adequately accurate rifle. The Lyman sight was in a class by itself.
I was surprised, though, that one point was not raised concerning accuracy - like every rifle in which the barrel/receiver assembly is attached to the stock by a single screw, the 69A accuracy is rather affected by the tightening of that screw, also by changes in atmospheric conditions. Some (well, maybe 40...) years ago Guns an Ammo featured an article about accurizing the mod. 69A by glassing the action and barrel. Unfortunately, I have not kept a copy.
So, to get the best possible groups, one must make tests by varying the tightening of the mounting screw until one finds the best set-up - and after that, not disasemble the rifle again unless absolutely needed, in which case new adjustments will be needed...

Just for your envy, and my despair, I also owned a Colt Match Target, a Colt Scout with dual cylinders, a Colt New Frontier with dual cylinders,and a S&W K22. Sold them over the years. Members of about my age will understand my despair...

Sorry, this is rather long post for a starter
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Old 01-10-2010, 10:58 AM
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Great little guns. That long barrel really hangs well for offhand shooting fun.

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Old 03-30-2010, 06:15 PM
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IF YOUR ONLINE I SENT YOU A MESSAGE ABOUT MY 69A WIN BILL
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Old 04-04-2010, 03:05 PM
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Updated with new information 4/5/10! See original post.

John
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Last edited by PALADIN85020; 04-05-2010 at 04:09 PM.
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Old 04-05-2010, 05:30 PM
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BTT - extensive new information and photo added.

John
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Old 04-06-2010, 12:07 AM
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Another great and informative post John.
Very timely for me as I just bought my first 69A about a month ago and it has become one of my most accurate shooting rifles.
Mine has a Redfield rear peep site.
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Old 04-10-2010, 04:36 AM
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Default 69A with front sling swivel only

Archer, you mentioned a 69A purchased in 1964, grooved receiver, Lyman 57 receiver sight (mine has a Lyman 58E), and a filler or a blank in the rear sight dovetail. Does your 69A also have only a front sling swivel for a 1-1/4 in. wide sling that came with the rifle? If so, then the rifle may be - is - a Junior Target Shooter Special. A very nice if not scarce variation of the model.
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Old 04-10-2010, 06:32 PM
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I have a 1942 Model 75 Target that I bought in 1969 from a used bookshop for $35. It is one of the most accurate rifles I have ever shot. Absolute death on juice cans at 100 yards (with Lyman iron sights).

Buck
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Old 07-11-2010, 06:40 AM
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Default 69A's

I own a 69 which my Father purchased for me at a Police auction for $7 in about 1959. I was 10 yrs old. It needed the magazine and rear peep sight which we got at the local gunsmiths. It was my first gun, a real project. I refinished the stock and rather poorly at that. My Father was not a fan of firearms and only tolerated my enthusiasm for them so he wasn't much help in the restoration. Anyway, it was in fact more accurate than any other .22 I owned over the years. I owned several others including a Win. pump, a Stevens auto and a Marlin bolt action. The Model 69 out shined all of them in the accuracy department at great distances. I have rekindled respect for these older classic well made precision pieces. I hope to find another 69/69A in excellent condition which I am sure will be more than the first one for $7. I was really surprised to find this thread on the S & W site, very interesting...........Cowford
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Old 08-21-2010, 04:14 PM
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Default Sight for Winchester 69

Hello, Im new to this forum. My husband is an avid gun collector and does gunsmithing on the side. He's been working on a winchester 69 and needs the rear peep sight. Does anyone know where I could get my hands on one, I'd love to surprise him.
Thank for your help!
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Old 08-21-2010, 05:48 PM
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Thanks for the post. Very informative. I love the Winchester .22's. I have a 67 boys rifle, 67,68,69,69a,74 and a 75 sporter. Most of the newer .22's are junk by comparison. IMHO
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Old 08-21-2010, 06:50 PM
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Nice write-up, they are great .22 rifles,
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Old 08-21-2010, 07:31 PM
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Gunnerswife, I did a quick search at Numrich gun parts, and Williams gun Sights. I could not find any. Maybe someone else can chime in with an idea for you. Good luck in your search and welcome to the forum.
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Old 09-25-2010, 04:27 PM
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Bought my first 69a at a cada show about 15 years ago. Paid the asking price without haggling and the guy that sold it too me was nonplussed to say the least. since then have added a 75 sporter (but really need a stock for it.) also have a model 47 whick is bacically a single shot 69. Great guns.
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Old 10-05-2011, 01:06 PM
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Default 69A trigger over-travel

My brother and I modified the triggers on my 69A and his Model 72 in the early 1950's by drilling and tapping a hole in the trigger housing, and inserting a headless screw (6-32?) to contact the rear of the trigger, thereby limiting over-travel to the extent possible. Not quite as good as the trigger on his Model 52, but very good, and more than adequate for our purposes. I don't have digital camera gear, but if other members are interested, I will ask my grandson if he could shoot a photo or two, which I can post or send to the member directly.

Many thanks for your history of this rifle. Very nicely done.
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Old 11-18-2011, 12:53 PM
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Default Updated/corrected information

After detail-studying some vintage Winchester catalogs, I've corrected and updated the original post information today.

John
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Old 11-18-2011, 05:25 PM
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heres mine....Nice might let her go.


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Old 11-19-2011, 12:56 AM
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Default vintage W Model 69A .22 rimfire rifle I had owned

years a go 40 or 45 My Dad had in his owned a Model 69A wIN
I stayed in the familey being passed down to me after my fathers death in 1975 my first rabbit was with this gun I had it for maybe ten years poor gun was through a fire her stock was slighly burned blueing was worn off but you know what she shot and aimed like ligtning. I my 14th birthday they
they my parents had a party for me my great Uncle showed with 20 boxes or more of .22 rimfire cartiriges plus what my Dad had and we fires that gun for four or five hours sticking in shorts Long. and long rifle into it barrel got ver hot she performed like a champ it was a real very good as far as accuracy was concerned and worked always flawlessly
I Dad had two clips for it One for shorts and one for Long and Long rifle I used to patrol his garden and shoot woodchucks with it man I wish that I never parted with that gun she was through a lot and always a first class performer
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Old 11-19-2011, 07:44 PM
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Have owned and shot a 69a for over 30 years. Both peep and open sights, and also a grooved receiver with a 1" 2.5X scope mounted. One of my all time favorite rimfires. Over the years have found a few items in regards to the model 69 + 69A. Thanks for the info.
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Old 11-20-2011, 01:39 AM
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I have a 69A, my first rifle as well and was a hand me down.
That rifle went everywhere with me! What great shooter!
Still have it too !
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Old 11-21-2011, 06:23 PM
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Hey everyone, Newbie to the forum but not to computing. I have some photo's of me recent purchase Winchester Model 69. perhaps you can give me some insight. I believe its a 1941 because the stamp on the receiver that i will post. Enjoy and thoughts please. [IMG][/IMG]

This is photo of original mag spoken of in this Thread starter
[IMG][/IMG]

This is a newly manufactured one a paid for for like 10 bucks with the W spoke of in original post
[IMG][/IMG]

Rear sight
[IMG][/IMG]

Front sight
[IMG][/IMG]

Front sight patent #
[IMG][/IMG]

Butt plate- Original
[IMG][/IMG]

Cocking knob/Safety
[IMG][/IMG]

receiver
[IMG][/IMG]

Date stamp on the receiver ????? Says "41" Have a look see yourself

[IMG][/IMG]


Thanks again and enjoy....please comment....My name is Randall this is my first post. Thank you gentlemen.
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Old 11-21-2011, 06:28 PM
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Off to the range....after holding it that long i have to go shoot it.... Thanks for the info guys great thread.
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Old 11-21-2011, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Rdogg View Post
Hey everyone, Newbie to the forum but not to computing. I have some photo's of me recent purchase Winchester Model 69. perhaps you can give me some insight. I believe its a 1941 because the stamp on the receiver that i will post. Enjoy and thoughts please.

Thanks again and enjoy....please comment....My name is Randall this is my first post. Thank you gentlemen.
Hi, Randall, and welcome to the forum! It would appear that you have an original Model 69, not a 69A. These date from 1935 to late 1937, so you would be off a few years in your date estimate. The tip-off is the cocking knob and the cock-on-closing action. The stamp on the receiver is probably an assembly or inspection stamp. Since yours has the projecting takedown screw, the latest it could have been made would be about September of 1937.

John
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Last edited by PALADIN85020; 11-21-2011 at 07:16 PM.
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Old 11-21-2011, 07:12 PM
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Originally Posted by PALADIN85020 View Post
Hi, Randall, and welcome to the forum! It would appear that you have an original Model 69, not a 69A. These date from 1935 to roughly 1937, so you would be off a few years in your date estimate. The tip-off is the cocking knob and the cock-on-closing action. The stamp on the receiver is probably an assembly or inspection stamp.

John

Awesome, Do you have any insight on what the 41 means? Stoked its from 1935-37.

Sorry, John...I had to reread your post. You said, "an assembly or inspection stamp." Thank you sooo much.

Last edited by Rdogg; 11-21-2011 at 07:15 PM.
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Old 11-21-2011, 07:16 PM
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Anyone have a 10 round clip they want to sell?
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Old 11-21-2011, 11:30 PM
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Default Winchester Model 75

Hi new to this forum but as a Model 75 owner I have a question
The safety lever was removed from this rifle, I still have it in a very old envelope. I was told this was done back in the day to lighten the trigger pull. Any one have any info on that particular practice?
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Old 11-22-2011, 12:19 AM
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In my opinion, such a practice would have no effect on trigger pull. The only things affecting trigger pull would be the strength of the firing pin spring, the angle of the sear notch on the firing pin, the smoothness of the sear and the adjustment screw on the trigger spring. All the safety does is move a block to prevent the trigger (and sear) from moving. When it's retracted, the trigger and sear are free to move. No significant additional friction is provided by the safety mechanism. I would consider removal of the safety to be a dangerous thing, and would never recommend it.

John
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Old 11-22-2011, 08:55 AM
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Thanks
now I just have to figure out how to reinstall it
Ive never shot because it had been removed, I have all the little parts for it. I was just unsure how to proceed with it
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:41 AM
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Anyone have a 10 round clip they want to sell?
yes i do...send me a pm...i prob have 10 69mags...shorts, standard and 10 round
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  #43  
Old 11-22-2011, 12:33 PM
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Thanks
now I just have to figure out how to reinstall it
Ive never shot because it had been removed, I have all the little parts for it. I was just unsure how to proceed with it
Here is a picture of the assembled mechanism on a Model 69A. The mechanism on the Model 75 is identical. The only difficult part might be drifting out the pivot pin. It's really quite simple.

Hope this helps.

John

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Last edited by PALADIN85020; 11-22-2011 at 12:50 PM.
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Old 11-22-2011, 04:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PALADIN85020 View Post
Here is a picture of the assembled mechanism on a Model 69A. The mechanism on the Model 75 is identical. The only difficult part might be drifting out the pivot pin. It's really quite simple.

Hope this helps.

John
Thanks! that is a great help. This is quit a place
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  #45  
Old 11-22-2011, 05:04 PM
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Since this thread originated I have aquired two more nice 69As. A match with the long rifle chamber only and a Junior Target Shooters Special with the single front sling swivel, blank in the rear dovetail and chambered for all S, L, LRs.

The top rifle is my 69 Dualsight, the next is a grooved receiver standard 69A, the next is a 69A Match chambered for LR only and the bottom is the reclusive 69A JTSS.





All three of the Lyman peeps are marked 57, but all have different suffixes and are made a little different.

Last edited by wundudnee; 11-22-2011 at 05:10 PM. Reason: spelin
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  #46  
Old 12-01-2011, 02:52 PM
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I wish I had the optics from the top rifle, 69 Dualsight it would mount right to my 75
Nice lookin collection!
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Old 12-06-2011, 11:08 PM
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Default 6 rifles for sale including Winchester 69A and 75

I have 6 guns in storage that were given to me years ago for rent and I was wondering if anyone was interested in purchasing. There are 4 cases for the following .22 rifles that I have. Photobucket link below.

1) Winchester 69A - no serial number on it
2. Winchester 75 - Serial # 16984
3. J Stevens Arms Co. Model 1915 svg on it and Serial # Z793
4. Remington Model 6
5. Marlin Firearms Model 883 Serial # 10669818
6. A classic older 22 with no mfg info on it. See pictures Serial #OT-51659

Let me know if anyone has interest as I'm selling for great deals as I search to find out what a reasonable selling price would be.

For pictures see this photobucket link, please.

http://photobucket.com/6Rifles4sale

Call w/ questions or interest. 302-442-8494 Thanks.





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Old 03-14-2013, 12:32 AM
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Originally Posted by 410bore View Post
yes i do...send me a pm...i prob have 10 69mags...shorts, standard and 10 round

Hello 410bore! I just joined the forum because I saw several people here have the old Winchester 69 model! I currently have one now as well, passed down from my grandfather to my dad then me. It isnt in pristine shape as it sat in a closet for years unmaintained! It does have some light rust and some dings on the barrel, slight rust on the metal around trigger guard, magazine well, etc... Stock seems pretty decent, but could use a good cleaning.

What are your thoughts of striping to metal, fixing the dings and rusty spots and re-blueing? I would say it has approx 70% original blueing, but it is turning brownish and faded in several spots. I know this was manufactured around 1936 or 1937. It will stay in the family and I am not going to sell it, but I would like it to look much better! ;-)

I qualified using this rifle for my marksmanship badge in the Boy Scouts when I was about 16! Then, it had a peep sight on it...not sure what kind it was, but it wasnt the Win #80A or the Lyman 57EW kind. It fit in the dovetail on the receiver and you manually adjusted the windage and elevation. I think it was a Williams? I am looking for one of these sights as well. I have some pics if you like.

3 things I need to complete this rifle are some 5 or 10 round magazines (I have one 5 rd), the front sight hood and of course the peep sight. If I can't find the peep sight, a standard one like the one "someone" (my brother in law...I think) put on it from a BB Gun! I have no idea what happened to the original sight. My step dad possibly took it off to make it less valuable...(long story).

I would appreciate any help on the above if you know anyone with the above parts and prices! Rdogg's pics of his rifle are the same peep sight, except he is missing the peep disk that screws into the rear of the sight.

Sorry for the long message!

Thanks 410bore... have a great day! Will be looking for your answers if you are still around...

Bob
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Old 03-16-2013, 04:25 PM
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You won't believe this, but I just got a 69A for a used toilet! kid you not. I didn't even really know what it was until I just got home and looked it upon line. I can't wait to strip it down and restore it. It is completely original, looks to be the match model.
This one is a Model 69A 22 Short, Long and Long Rifle, has the Lyman peep. Interestingly, the magazine has a patent of Nov. 25, 1919
Anyone know the age of this one? I love the feel of this gun, an american classic and goes well with my Winchester '94.

Last edited by cotebuild; 03-16-2013 at 04:37 PM.
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Old 07-20-2013, 04:00 PM
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I just purchased a Winchester 69 from a buddy for $100. It has both the .22 short and .22lr. magazines. It is a first generation model with the "safe" & "fire" bolt. I read that they were made from March 1935 until Sept. 1937.

In August 1935, the bolt was redesigned to incorporate a "rebounding firing pin". I have no idea what a rebounding firing pin is. How would I know if my rifle has the original style bolt or the "rebounding firing pin"?

Any and all assistance will be greatly appreciated.
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