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Old 05-05-2013, 03:02 PM
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Default Early Mauser pocket pistols!

This brief history is being written for eventual publication, probably in Dillon's Blue Press catalog/magazine. Comments welcome - hope you enjoy it.

John



Early single-action Mauser pocket pistols were once widely used throughout the world and universally recognized as dependable, practical and concealable personal defense handguns. Their profiles were fashionable for similar kids’ toys in the 1940s and 1950s, and even plastic squirt guns were made in their distinctive shape. The final model of this series was eventually phased out in 1939. These classic compact handguns have now found a niche in the collectors’ market, and many are still entirely serviceable and useful for their original purpose of self-protection.

In the early 20th Century, Mauser-Werke in Oberndorf, Germany had been experimenting with developing a family of blowback semiautomatic pistols, chambered for various calibers and of different sizes. The first efforts at Mauser were spearheaded by Fidel Feederle, who with his brother had originated the C96 “broomhandle” pistol. Assisting him was a talented young engineer, Josef Nickl, who had joined the firm in 1904. In fact it was Nickl who bore most of the responsibility for these early pistols, and who designed the first of the breed, the 9mm Parabellum model 1909. Originally this pistol was designed with a locking breech, but in the interest of simplicity, a blowback design was experimented with. A blowback pistol has an unlocked breech, relying solely on the mass of the slide to secure the breech during firing. It proved unworkable in this caliber of pistol. The 9mm cartridge was way too powerful unless the arm was made much larger, with a massive slide. Accordingly, attention was devoted to a scaled-down pocket version that would accept smaller and less abusive cartridges such as the .32 and .25 ACP rounds.

Still, the model 1909 was a useful exercise. It had a number of innovative features, which Mauser was quick to patent. Many of these attributes would then be applied to a successor pocket pistol, the model of 1910. This weighed 21 ounces (including an unloaded magazine). Like the model 1909 before it, the barrel was secured by a long locking pin. It could be released with a swiveling latch at its front end, allowing easy disassembly. The pistol was striker-fired, having no internal hammer. When the pistol was cocked by slide retraction and release, an indicator pin protruded from the rear of the frame, signifying the cocked condition. The slide had a forward open-top section, with a semi-oval ejection port on the right side. A long extractor was fitted. Upon firing the last round, the slide locked to the rear. Removal and re-insertion of a loaded or unloaded magazine would automatically release the slide to go forward, chambering a round if the magazine was loaded. There was no manually-operated slide release. This particular feature was also utilized in the later Model HSc, and is often confusing when first encountered. A push-down manual safety lever was incorporated on the left side of the pistol to the rear of the trigger. An adjacent button had to be pressed to disengage the safety. There was a heel-mounted magazine release for the eight-shot magazine. A removable side plate on the left side allowed access to the pistol’s trigger mechanism, and the earliest pistols had a latch for this side plate. A raised section of retraction grooves was provided on each side of the slide near the rear. A magazine safety prevented firing if the magazine was removed. One-piece wood grips were initially offered, soon replaced by wrap-around hard rubber grips. The first offering was chambered for the 6.35 mm (.25 ACP) cartridge. Bluing was the norm, although a few pistols were factory nickel plated and/or engraved. The front sight had a half-moon profile. The rear sight could be drifted laterally slightly for windage adjustment. The magazine held 9 rounds.

The model 1910 proved to be an immediate hit on the marketplace. It was finely crafted and finished. It also had more heft and a longer barrel than its Browning and Colt pocket pistol competitors. Approximately 60,000 of these pistols were made and sold between 1910 and 1913. A .32 ACP caliber (7.65mm) version was introduced in January 1914, which collectors now call the model 1910/14. It was in production until 1917 and featured an eight-round magazine. Some went into military service and will have an acceptance stamp in front of the rear sight. Some of these will also bear the Prussian eagle stamp, usually on the front of the trigger guard. The earlier ones had a “humpback” slide. Following WWI, production was resumed and continued until the introduction of the Model 1934.

Various cosmetic and internal variations were gradually introduced in the pocket pistol line, giving modern-day collectors some vexing challenges to classify and collect. A couple of these have since been dubbed as the models 1910/34 and the transitional model 1914/34. Enough changes exist that few parts of the earliest pistols will interchange with those made after 1914. However, the final upgraded result was the Neues Modell 1934, or more simply today, the model of 1934. Some Mauser advertising in that era referred to it as the Kal. 7.65mm (Achtlader), or eight-shot self-loader. There were two main visually distinguishing features on this pistol. The first was a more rounded rear grip shape, giving it a more ergonomic feel. Also, a machined-out section on the left of the slide served to better protect the serial number from removal or defacement. Grips could be either wood or plastic. A number of stamped components were introduced, including the magazine catch. The left side of the slide was marked with the serial number in its scooped-out forward section, and “MAUSER-WERKE A.G. OBERNDORF A.N.”. The Mauser oval trademark was stamped on the sideplate of the frame on the left. The right side of the slide was usually marked “Cal. 7,65 D.R.P.U.A.P.” Sometimes the comma in the millimeter designation was replaced with a period. The last three digits of the serial number were marked on the back of the frame and some other parts. A smaller number of 6.35mm (.25 ACP) pistols were produced, mostly for export beyond Germany’s borders.

The pistol illustrated is one of the .32 caliber model 1934s, and according to its serial number, it was manufactured in the first year of that model’s production as a commercial pistol. Mauser sales literature dating from 1939 shows the price of the .32 Model 1934 as 39 Reich marks, or approximately 10 U.S. dollars at the time.

Many of the first Model 1934s were issued to the German Kriegsmarine, or Navy. These will show the “Eagle over M” maritime markings. The Model 1934 was also common with police agencies, the military and paramilitary units. These will often show unit markings and sometimes NSDAP (National Socialist or Nazi party) stamps.

In 1930, Mauser had taken over production of the P.08 (Parabellum or Luger) pistol for military usage, so the company was on a good financial footing. However, sales of Mauser’s pocket pistols began to decline in the decade of the 1930s. Although these guns were highly regarded, the substantial sales of Walther’s popular PP and PPK double-action pistols were taking their toll. The Walther PP was first offered commercially in 1929, and the PPK in 1931. Seeing this emerging competitive threat, Mauser began feverishly to develop a pistol to address this development. Under the direction of Alex Seidel, the double-action Mauser HSc pistol was designed to meet the Walther challenge and to avoid the Walther patents. Although production could have been initiated in 1938, it was not until 1940 that approval was finally granted for full-scale HSc production. That sounded the death knell for the Model 1934 single-action pistols, and that phase of the Mauser story faded into history.

Today, the early Mauser pocket pistols are still regarded as masterpieces of design for their time, and examples of the many esoteric variations are eagerly sought by collectors. They are classics from a bygone time, and still reflect innovative design and engineering skill.


(c) 2013 JLM
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Old 05-05-2013, 03:15 PM
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That was well written.Thank you.

Scott
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Old 05-05-2013, 05:37 PM
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John-

Very well done. If you have the DVD of, "The Guns of Navarone", look for the M-34 (?) .32 carried by the German officer whose troops captured the British sabotage team.
(Of course, they escaped.) It's the only film appearance that I recall for these pistols.

I'm quite sure that I was the only kid in my high school class to spot that little Mauser for what it was when the movie first appeared.

Why was the 1930's price so low? Wasn't the Colt .32 quite a bit more expensive? I think a new Govt. Model .45 sold for $36.75 then, if I recall an old catalog correctly. Don't know their price for the .32.

Do you have a photo of the other side of the gun?

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Old 05-05-2013, 09:13 PM
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John-

Very well done. If you have the DVD of, "The Guns of Navarone", look for the M-34 (?) .32 carried by the German officer whose troops captured the British sabotage team.
(Of course, they escaped.) It's the only film appearance that I recall for these pistols.

I'm quite sure that I was the only kid in my high school class to spot that little Mauser for what it was when the movie first appeared.

Why was the 1930's price so low? Wasn't the Colt .32 quite a bit more expensive? I think a new Govt. Model .45 sold for $36.75 then, if I recall an old catalog correctly. Don't know their price for the .32.

Do you have a photo of the other side of the gun?
Tex,

I do have a DVD of the Guns of Navarone - I'll have to look for that scene when I have time. The comment I made about squirt guns at the start of the article comes from personal experience as a kid in the early '50s - I had a transparent lime green plastic squirt pistol that was a pretty perfect rendition of the Mauser single action pocket pistol. I recall buying it at the neighborhood hardware store for not much coin.

The price in 1939 was probably low because Mauser was liquidating its inventory of a soon to be obsolete gun - the HSc was introduced and sold the next year.

And yes, I do have a pic of the other side! Not quite as photogenic as the right side, probably due to holster wear. Most holster guns seem to wear more on the side closest to the body. Only one pic can be shown for the Blue Press articles.

John

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Old 05-06-2013, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by PALADIN85020 View Post
Tex,

I do have a DVD of the Guns of Navarone - I'll have to look for that scene when I have time. The comment I made about squirt guns at the start of the article comes from personal experience as a kid in the early '50s - I had a transparent lime green plastic squirt pistol that was a pretty perfect rendition of the Mauser single action pocket pistol. I recall buying it at the neighborhood hardware store for not much coin.

The price in 1939 was probably low because Mauser was liquidating its inventory of a soon to be obsolete gun - the HSc was introduced and sold the next year.

And yes, I do have a pic of the other side! Not quite as photogenic as the right side, probably due to holster wear. Most holster guns seem to wear more on the side closest to the body. Only one pic can be shown for the Blue Press articles.

John

Thanks. I wanted to see the left side to see the recessed area for the serial number that you mentioned.
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Old 05-22-2013, 02:44 PM
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Hello

Maybe he need to say that the Mauser was Jihoceska subsidiary of Brno (JB) who later called Zbrojovka Brno (ZB) and finally known by everyone call Ceska Zbrojovka Brno (CZ-Brno).
This company was responazable of creation of Vzor -22, 24 and 27. Led by the Chief Engineer Josef Nickl.

Among other things to mention the famous missing Nickl prototypes.

I can show photos of 2 pistols with the same appearance and different mechanisms.
But even these pistols are not pocket, but an evolution towards COLT size 1911 and 9 mm Prabellum (9x19)

You can see my blog for photos. greetings juangomez

PD http://www.google.com.ar/url?sa=t&rc...46751780,d.dmQ
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Old 05-22-2013, 03:25 PM
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Hello

Maybe he need to say that the Mauser was Jihoceska subsidiary of Brno (JB) who later called Zbrojovka Brno (ZB) and finally known by everyone call Ceska Zbrojovka Brno (CZ-Brno).
This company was responazable of creation of Vzor -22, 24 and 27. Led by the Chief Engineer Josef Nickl.

Among other things to mention the famous missing Nickl prototypes.

I can show photos of 2 pistols with the same appearance and different mechanisms.
But even these pistols are not pocket, but an evolution towards COLT size 1911 and 9 mm Prabellum (9x19)

You can see my blog for photos. greetings juangomez

PD http://www.google.com.ar/url?sa=t&rc...46751780,d.dmQ
Very interesting pistols. It would seem that these were experimental pistols by Nickl made well after the Model 1909 9mm Parabellum guns mentioned in the article. They have evidently borrowed the slide retraction "bumps" from the 1910 pocket model. Many thanks for the link! The relationship between Mauser and Brno continued into the World War II years. I have a 98K rifle coded "dot", made in 1944 at Brno when Czechoslovakia was under German occupation. Interestingly, the stamped trigger guard/magazine assembly was made by Mauser in Oberndorf (stamped "byf"), and this was correct for this particular variation. The two firms traded technology and parts.

John
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Old 05-22-2013, 05:54 PM
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I can actually pronouce, Ceska Zbrojovka correctly. I had a Czech-born pharmacist check me out. She was amazed, saying that no other American she knows could do it.

But I know people who can't pronouce Swarovski right. That's really easy, compared to Czech!

Excuse me while I get a cup of coffee and some Tylenol. I just pronounced that again and it gave me a headache and twisted my tongue. But I said it!

BTW, John, I also recall those "Mauser" water pistols. I've also seen Luger, P-38, and Mauser M-96 water pistols. One of the Luger was full size and pretty real looking. I suppose changing demographics and the endless rant about gun crime and the need to save "the children" will preclude us from ever again seeing those realistic water pistols and cap pistols.

To be sure, we now have Air Soft guns that are even more real. But few kids can afford one.

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Old 05-22-2013, 11:35 PM
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[QUOTE=PALADIN85020;137204298]This brief history is being written for eventual publication, probably in Dillon's Blue Press catalog/magazine. Comments welcome - hope you enjoy it. John

A .25 ACP caliber (6.35mm) version was introduced in January 1914, which collectors now call the model 1910/14. It was produced through 1917, and featured a nine-round magazine. END QUOTE.

John: Model 1910 was in 6.35mm (25 ACP) and the 1914 was 32 ACP (7.65mm). the first 1910s were the 'sidelatch' variation that you describe, and the first 1914s were the 'humpback' variation. The 1910, 6.35mm, and the 1914, 7.65mm, stayed in production until the apppearance of the 1934 with its more ergonomic grip. Some 1914s were accepted into German service: they have a military acceptance mark in front ofthe rear sight, and many have the Prussian Eagle stamp, usually on the front of the trigger guard.

The reference on these pistols is Roy Pender's "Mauser Pocket Pistols". I'm aware of at least one more book on them in preparation.

A friend of mine collects these things. The upper left pistol in the first picture is a sidelatch Model 1910 in 6.35mm. The upper left pistol in the second picture is a humpback Model 1914 in 7.65mm.
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Old 05-23-2013, 01:25 AM
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[QUOTE=Cyrano;137238511]
Quote:
Originally Posted by PALADIN85020 View Post
This brief history is being written for eventual publication, probably in Dillon's Blue Press catalog/magazine. Comments welcome - hope you enjoy it. John

A .25 ACP caliber (6.35mm) version was introduced in January 1914, which collectors now call the model 1910/14. It was produced through 1917, and featured a nine-round magazine. END QUOTE.

John: Model 1910 was in 6.35mm (25 ACP) and the 1914 was 32 ACP (7.65mm). the first 1910s were the 'sidelatch' variation that you describe, and the first 1914s were the 'humpback' variation. The 1910, 6.35mm, and the 1914, 7.65mm, stayed in production until the apppearance of the 1934 with its more ergonomic grip. Some 1914s were accepted into German service: they have a military acceptance mark in front ofthe rear sight, and many have the Prussian Eagle stamp, usually on the front of the trigger guard.

The reference on these pistols is Roy Pender's "Mauser Pocket Pistols". I'm aware of at least one more book on them in preparation.

A friend of mine collects these things. The upper left pistol in the first picture is a sidelatch Model 1910 in 6.35mm. The upper left pistol in the second picture is a humpback Model 1914 in 7.65mm.
Thank you for that information! You are quite correct, I got the calibers sequentially reversed. I must have been up late when references start to look blurry! I double checked my copy of Mauser Pistolen by Weaver, Speed and Schmid, and I confirmed your information. Please do check the revised original post to be sure alles ist en orderen, OK?

Thanks,
John
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Old 05-23-2013, 01:34 AM
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Another fine article! You are always interesting while
giving an education.
TACC1
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Old 05-23-2013, 07:41 AM
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I've got one that Dad brought back from WWII. .32 cal with the black plastic grips. Fun little gun. I can't stand the mag's heel release though.

In the Guns of Navarone you'll also see the 1914 with a silencer attached. In the scene where he's ready to shoot the girl and then subsequently threatens David Nivin's character.
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Old 05-23-2013, 07:52 AM
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I played with one the other day at a LGS. Really neat pistol. This particular one was being sold cheap because it had a problem with the stricker not re setting all the time. I really liked the internal slide release feature. Slide locks back on empty mag but re insert a ne mag and the slide closes automatically

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Old 05-23-2013, 07:35 PM
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In Google Images you will find pictures of Robert Vaughan as "Napoleon Solo" with an M1914/1934 converted into a carbine.
I have one, a commercial model, GI bring back, beautiful fit and finish, the takedown is rather tricky. Very accurate.
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Old 05-23-2013, 08:18 PM
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This was also the first "U.N.C.L.E. Special" from "The Man from U.N.C.L.E.", until replaced by the modified Walther P-38.
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Old 05-24-2013, 12:51 AM
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Looks good to me upon re-reading. However I think the terms 1910/34 and 1914/34 were just references to the Modell 1934 instead of prototypes. However if you're looking for someone who knows a little about Mauser Pocket pistols, I know as little as anyone.
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Old 05-24-2013, 06:32 PM
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Hello:

The majority of Mauser pistols were of small size (pocket), except for the C-96 (all sizes), M1912 (9 mm Parabellum and .45 ACP), Aberman collection 45 ACP M1915), M1916 (9 mm Parabellum , those of my blog), M1917 (Model H), M711 and M712 (all caliber).

In addition there are 5 sets of cannons mechanisms.
1 C-96 and variations.
M1910-M1914 2nd and variations of pockets. (Sist. with 2 pivots)
3rd M1912 (with larva)
4th M1915 (rotor)
5th M1916 (nonrotating system)

Greetings juangomez

PS I do not understand Texas star??
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Old 05-24-2013, 08:42 PM
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My very first handgun was a Mauser 1910 in 6.35 (25 apc). Looks identical to the 1914 which is in 7.65 (32 acp), just a tad smaller. If anyone ever runs across a 1910 with a small round brown burn spot on the back of the grip (sun & magnifying glass) what a 14 year old kid would do, let me know. I taught myself to disassemble it and clean it without any instructions. To this day I tear down nearly every gun I buy to clean it and lube first thing.
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Old 05-25-2013, 12:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juangomez View Post
Hello:

The majority of Mauser pistols were of small size (pocket), except for the C-96 (all sizes), M1912 (9 mm Parabellum and .45 ACP), Aberman collection 45 ACP M1915), M1916 (9 mm Parabellum , those of my blog), M1917 (Model H), M711 and M712 (all caliber).

In addition there are 5 sets of cannons mechanisms.
1 C-96 and variations.
M1910-M1914 2nd and variations of pockets. (Sist. with 2 pivots)
3rd M1912 (with larva)
4th M1915 (rotor)
5th M1916 (nonrotating system)

Greetings juangomez

PS I do not understand Texas star??
Mauser also made P.38 and P.08 Parabellum (Luger) pistols; I happen to have a nice S/42 1936 example of the latter.

John

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Old 05-31-2013, 02:50 PM
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ok .Site the years 1910-1935.

true also the P08 and P38.

The p 08 with the system of the Borchardt pistol but otherwise settled (for the space).
And the p38 have a system with a ramp on the barrel pivots.

greetings juangomez
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Old 05-31-2013, 05:13 PM
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Juan-

What don't you understand about my earlier post?

If it's why I brought up CZ, it's because they made the P-24 and P-27, variations on Josef Nickl's designs. Basically very close to the Mauser pistols but different cosmetically.

If it's about how to pronounce the name of the company, this was a joke, una broma, because most Americans and other English speakers have trouble saying those words.
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Old 06-03-2013, 07:05 PM
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I understand your joke!

I had no clear that variations in CZ as you say are called P-24 and P-27.
I only know the denomination VZ-22 and VZ-24 or rather vzor vzor -22 and-24.

Some time later came the VZ-27 or rather vzor-27.

Or in English: Model-22, model-24 and model-27.

vzor "Czech" translation "model" English.

CZ is not named that the begin also it was not and that is confused with the famous CZ-22 rifle and beyond.

regards
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Old 07-07-2013, 10:18 AM
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Any idea how many of these models 1914 & 1934 were produced altogether?
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Old 07-07-2013, 12:47 PM
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Any idea how many of these models 1914 & 1934 were produced altogether?
As far as I know, there are no really accurate grand totals. A lot of Mauser's records were destroyed, pilfered or lost when their factory at Oberndorf on the Neckar river was overrun by the Allies during WWII. By the same token, some ballpark figures by advanced collectors indicate that about 172,000 Models 1914 and 136,000 Models 1934 were produced.

Hope this helps.

John
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Old 07-07-2013, 01:13 PM
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Great thread !!!!
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