Smith & Wesson Forum

Go Back   Smith & Wesson Forum > General Topics > The Lounge
Forum Register Expert Commentary Members List


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-09-2014, 09:14 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Delaware
Posts: 913
Likes: 707
Liked 420 Times in 187 Posts
Default Diabetes-- Help

I had Diabetes for 5 years - I'm taking Metformin 2x 1000. Dr. wants to put me on insulin. My A1C is now 8.5
I been real good with taking my numbers -only to find out it's high 180 to 200 all morning until i eat then is goes down to 120.
I worked the midnight shift for 40 years and now retired. I don't eat when i get up in the morn., until 2 pm. Today i had something to eat. When i took my blood is was 120 and when i took it before i eat is was 188.
I'm trying to not go on insulin. Today is my 2 nd. 4 hour class. Diabetes class. I should of went 5 years ago.
Can anyone tell me what they did to lower your numbers. I am going to the gym and i eat all what i am told. Maybe i'm not taking the meds right ? 7 am and 7 pm.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-09-2014, 09:54 AM
fat tom's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Central South Carolina
Posts: 5,526
Likes: 3,431
Liked 6,136 Times in 1,656 Posts
Default

I also take the Metformin 2x1000 and have to inject every day with insulin as well. Due to a severe back injury,most forms of exercise are impossible. I'm "pretty good" about what I eat and my glucose level is okay for the most part. The problem with diabetes is that it gets progressively worse,thus the more you have to do to combat it. If you are doing your part and your A1C continues to be 8.5 or above,TAKE the insulin! It ain't that bad. The biggest drawback is that it's EXPENSIVE and there ain't no such thing as generic insulin.
f.t.
__________________
South Carolina-God's country
Reply With Quote
The Following User Likes This Post:
  #3  
Old 01-09-2014, 09:55 AM
steamloco76's Avatar
SWCA Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,790
Likes: 844
Liked 1,622 Times in 663 Posts
Default

A long acting, once a day insulin may be your best option. Levemir is such an insulin. You take it once a day, usually in the evening. It works to level out you blood sugar throughout the day. Available in pens and vial and syringe form. neither needs refrigeration for up to 28 days.
__________________
Stand & Fight! Join the NRA
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-09-2014, 09:56 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Eastern Washington
Posts: 1,869
Likes: 830
Liked 1,488 Times in 608 Posts
Default

Slow acting or fast acting insulin. I went on slow acting last year or so. One shot in the evening. My fasting (7 AM) is about 120 and below. Mine hasn't been too good A1C about 7.5. I'm moving my evening shot up to about 3 PM. I also don't eat breakfast, a light lunch and a medium sized dinner. My doc also wants to put me on fast acting insulin. I currently take 3 metformin and 1 Glyburide (1 & 1 in AM, 2x in PM).

All I can do is commiserate with you.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-09-2014, 10:14 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Delaware
Posts: 913
Likes: 707
Liked 420 Times in 187 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fat tom View Post
I also take the Metformin 2x1000 and have to inject every day with insulin as well. Due to a severe back injury,most forms of exercise are impossible. I'm "pretty good" about what I eat and my glucose level is okay for the most part. The problem with diabetes is that it gets progressively worse,thus the more you have to do to combat it. If you are doing your part and your A1C continues to be 8.5 or above,TAKE the insulin! It ain't that bad. The biggest drawback is that it's EXPENSIVE and there ain't no such thing as generic insulin.
f.t.
Wow -that is my problem -2 lower back surg. and i need R/knee replacement and had 4 surg. on r/knee and one on left. I just started the gym -the last time i went-i hurt my back. I'm starting real slow at the gym. My wife is freaking out because of the insulin shots that i may have to take.
Looks like i have to eat 3 or 4x a day and i don't drink water. I'm going to have to do a few things. Please keep the info. coming.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-09-2014, 10:31 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: South East Arkansas
Posts: 427
Likes: 85
Liked 99 Times in 33 Posts
Default

I took Metformin and Lantus (a time release insulin) and could not get my A1C below 7.5. A few months ago I started Humalog before meals and it's down to 6.2 and falling. Thank goodness for a good Part D supplement. Back when I was using a gallon of Evan every week I never got sick so I went undiagnosed for years and was told then that everything was good if my blood sugar was 200 or better. Now they would have a fit. I have all the ill effects to my hands, feet, and eyes but I have no right to still be kicking. I hope you do well.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-09-2014, 10:37 AM
Bkreutz's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Shoreline, WA
Posts: 2,796
Likes: 623
Liked 1,768 Times in 868 Posts
Default

Follow whatever recommendations your doctor gives you. My pancreas quit working in 1988 due to an injury so I've been a diabetic ever since. There are a lot of different strategies out there and they have to be tailored to the individual situation. Mine have changed more times than I can remember. I check my sugars at least 3 times a day and my insulin doses are adjusted depending on the results of my checks. My A1C is great and I can't exercise as much as I would like (bunch of artificial joints) but my diet is controlled. If you take care to follow instructions diabetes almost becomes a non issue. Good luck
__________________
RA '70-'79
Reply With Quote
The Following User Likes This Post:
  #8  
Old 01-09-2014, 11:07 AM
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: California
Posts: 1,006
Likes: 587
Liked 1,330 Times in 522 Posts
Default

The following is hard for me to open up about because I have not publicly written or spoken about being diabetic before - - it's been one of my more closely-guarded secrets. Only some family, and a couple of close friends like my dive partners knew.

I was diagnosed with type II diabetes over ten years ago (on Sept 13th, 2001 - - what a horrid week that was) after a life insurance physical spotted extremely high blood glucose numbers, and had managed to stay on oral meds, though it was a struggle for most of that time. Dosages kept creeping up to keep things in check.

About a year ago, my doc was seriously looking toward insulin; I was on max does of metformin and glyburide, but my numbers had been creeping up for that year and were not improving. I was starting to feel the first signs of neuropathy in my feet, too.

I was personally strongly opposed to going on an insulin injection regimen, for two reasons: one, it makes weight control a lot more difficult (something I've fought all my life to begin with) and two, my grandmother was an insulin dependent diabetic and I have strongly negative childhood memories of her having to cope with it, as she lived with us for a number of years when I was a kid.

So I started looking for alternative info, and I happened across the work of Gary Taubes and Dr. Peter Attia. Taubes is a science journalist and statistic investigator, and Attia is a MD, surgeon, and fitness enthusiast. Both are proponents of very-low-carb, no-refined-sugar diets, like the Duke Lifestyle diet, coupled with whatever exercize a person can manage.

After having read a couple of Taubes' books, I switched to the Duke diet (as best as I can stick to it) and got more religious about exercize - mainly getting out to walk briskly for 30 minutes or so most days a week. It's not a real easy diet to stick to, but it has one saving grace - - it flat out works.

I dropped nearly 60 pounds in 9 months (from 275 to 215), was able to reduce my oral meds dramatically (metformin dose cut by half, & am now ready to drop gyburide completely as even the minimum possible daily dose tends to push me hypoglycemic), and my A1c's now hover around 6.9-7.2. If I can drop another 15 lbs or so I may be able to stop meds entirely.

My 30-day average glucose this morning was 92.

Interestingly, even though I eat 3 eggs every day for breakfast & a great deal of all kinds of meat, my cholesterol numbers also plummeted & are now excellent.

My doctor was bug-eyed. I actually saw him smile.

I see a lot of other type-II people in web forums who have had similar experiences; going very-low-carb, focusing instead on proteins, fats, and fiber in the diet, dodging refined sugars as far as possible, minor increases in exercize leading to weight losses that seem to be the key to reducing/reversing diabetic impact.

I don't know if it works for everyone the same way as there's still a lot of unknowns about diabetic triggers & metabolism, but it made a huge difference for me.

I miss some favorite foods and I've never really enjoyed salads, so I do 'cheat' once in a while, but I don't miss them so much I'm willing to go on insulin for them.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-09-2014, 11:19 AM
05CarbonDRZ's Avatar
SWCA Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Cottage Grove,WI
Posts: 3,117
Likes: 904
Liked 2,719 Times in 933 Posts
Default

Sorry to hear about your Health issues,Hang in there.By Midnight shift do you mean third shift(12:00-8:00am)? If so I have a feeling that your work schedule contributed to your issues.I worked third shift for three years and I could tell that is was wreaking havok to my system.Humans are just not programmed to eat "lunch" at 3:00am.It probably took a solid year of working the day shift before I felt that my system had reset.
__________________
S&WCA #2771
Reply With Quote
The Following User Likes This Post:
  #10  
Old 01-09-2014, 12:23 PM
Thiokol's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Northeast, Illinois
Posts: 4,963
Likes: 13
Liked 272 Times in 93 Posts
Default

Ask your physician about Janumet. It is a combination of Metformin & Januvia.
__________________
SWCA Member #2262
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-09-2014, 01:03 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2,913
Likes: 799
Liked 769 Times in 437 Posts
Default

if possible get to an endocrinologist and get their opinion. that is what they do and are up all the latest treatments and meds.i have been on insulin for over 15yrs. now. it isn't the end of the world unless you ignore the drs. advice. the expense is a big deal. I take 2 different types,humalog and lantus and inject 4 times per day and check blood before each meal and at bedtime. if you want to talk about this more, send me a pm and will help all I can.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Likes This Post:
  #12  
Old 01-09-2014, 01:08 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: On the western frontier
Posts: 382
Likes: 0
Liked 63 Times in 42 Posts
Default

I do not have diabetes, but I have lost tons of weight, feel better than I ever did, and saw EVERY SINGLE blood test marker improve dramatically by sticking to a low carb Atkins style plan. Fats, cholesterol, FBS, BP, A1C, etc. Every single one got substantially better.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-09-2014, 05:12 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Delaware
Posts: 913
Likes: 707
Liked 420 Times in 187 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by UncaGrunny View Post
The following is hard for me to open up about because I have not publicly written or spoken about being diabetic before - - it's been one of my more closely-guarded secrets. Only some family, and a couple of close friends like my dive partners knew.

I was diagnosed with type II diabetes over ten years ago (on Sept 13th, 2001 - - what a horrid week that was) after a life insurance physical spotted extremely high blood glucose numbers, and had managed to stay on oral meds, though it was a struggle for most of that time. Dosages kept creeping up to keep things in check.

About a year ago, my doc was seriously looking toward insulin; I was on max does of metformin and glyburide, but my numbers had been creeping up for that year and were not improving. I was starting to feel the first signs of neuropathy in my feet, too.

I was personally strongly opposed to going on an insulin injection regimen, for two reasons: one, it makes weight control a lot more difficult (something I've fought all my life to begin with) and two, my grandmother was an insulin dependent diabetic and I have strongly negative childhood memories of her having to cope with it, as she lived with us for a number of years when I was a kid.

So I started looking for alternative info, and I happened across the work of Gary Taubes and Dr. Peter Attia. Taubes is a science journalist and statistic investigator, and Attia is a MD, surgeon, and fitness enthusiast. Both are proponents of very-low-carb, no-refined-sugar diets, like the Duke Lifestyle diet, coupled with whatever exercize a person can manage.

After having read a couple of Taubes' books, I switched to the Duke diet (as best as I can stick to it) and got more religious about exercize - mainly getting out to walk briskly for 30 minutes or so most days a week. It's not a real easy diet to stick to, but it has one saving grace - - it flat out works.

I dropped nearly 60 pounds in 9 months (from 275 to 215), was able to reduce my oral meds dramatically (metformin dose cut by half, & am now ready to drop gyburide completely as even the minimum possible daily dose tends to push me hypoglycemic), and my A1c's now hover around 6.9-7.2. If I can drop another 15 lbs or so I may be able to stop meds entirely.

My 30-day average glucose this morning was 92.

Interestingly, even though I eat 3 eggs every day for breakfast & a great deal of all kinds of meat, my cholesterol numbers also plummeted & are now excellent.

My doctor was bug-eyed. I actually saw him smile.

I see a lot of other type-II people in web forums who have had similar experiences; going very-low-carb, focusing instead on proteins, fats, and fiber in the diet, dodging refined sugars as far as possible, minor increases in exercize leading to weight losses that seem to be the key to reducing/reversing diabetic impact.

I don't know if it works for everyone the same way as there's still a lot of unknowns about diabetic triggers & metabolism, but it made a huge difference for me.

I miss some favorite foods and I've never really enjoyed salads, so I do 'cheat' once in a while, but I don't miss them so much I'm willing to go on insulin for them.
I thank you ...... Came back from my 4 hour class. Looks like walking or gym every day and Low carbs will be a part of my life..
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-09-2014, 07:40 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2,913
Likes: 799
Liked 769 Times in 437 Posts
Default

counting carbs is a big thing too. ask your dr. how many per day would work for you and do your best to keep to that number. I have to count everything I eat, so eating out can be an adventure.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-09-2014, 07:44 PM
Taurus627's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 303
Likes: 162
Liked 191 Times in 99 Posts
Default

Doc put me on Metformin about 2 months back and with giving up a ton of sugar and carbs in my diet, exercising 3 to 4 times a week (with the cold, I hit our local shoping mall and walk 3 to 4 laps) my glucose level came down to a weekly average of 98 to 106. No insulin and doc says I should not need it. It also helps I have dropped 30 ponds in the last 2 months!
__________________
NRA Life member
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 01-09-2014, 07:51 PM
Dutchs's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Florida
Posts: 245
Likes: 64
Liked 109 Times in 55 Posts
Default

Longtime Diabetic here..I take Kombyglize and am Insulin dependent. I am lucky enough to have insurance that is good and I am on a PUMP. I once thought Insulin was a terrible way to go as well. Although the preference would be no Meds. or Insulin I have a severe family tendency to Diabetes and my body just will not function properly without the Insulin. I have come to look at it as a blessing really though. Witht he PUMP and proper medicine and reasonable diet my A1C stays around 6 and my blood sugar numbers are almost always vey normalized. I decided Being on Isulin wasn't a death sentence to me but a way for me to live a fairly normal life and stay relatively healthy regardless.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Like Post:
  #17  
Old 01-09-2014, 07:54 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Delaware
Posts: 913
Likes: 707
Liked 420 Times in 187 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taurus627 View Post
Doc put me on Metformin about 2 months back and with giving up a ton of sugar and carbs in my diet, exercising 3 to 4 times a week (with the cold, I hit our local shoping mall and walk 3 to 4 laps) my glucose level came down to a weekly average of 98 to 106. No insulin and doc says I should not need it. It also helps I have dropped 30 ponds in the last 2 months!
That was me 5 years ago. Dr. said i was his best patients. Then comes time. I have to do what you are saying X 2 or 3
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 01-09-2014, 08:35 PM
bobf's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Florida
Posts: 564
Likes: 330
Liked 297 Times in 107 Posts
Default

When I was diagnosed my blood sugar was 796. I started with insulin, Glipizide and Metformin. In a few months switched to Kombiglyze XR 2x daily. Within a few months I was down to 1 a day.

For me the meal and snack schedule is an important part of regulating my blood sugar. If I skip a meal or snack my blood sugar is going to go up.

3 meals a day plus 3 snacks. 220 carbs per day, I try to do 60 carbs per meal for 180, the other 40 for snacks.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Likes This Post:
  #19  
Old 01-09-2014, 09:13 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 325
Likes: 7
Liked 149 Times in 42 Posts
Arrow

Quote:
Originally Posted by S&W357 View Post
I had Diabetes for 5 years - I'm taking Metformin 2x 1000. Dr. wants to put me on insulin. My A1C is now 8.5. . .
Can anyone tell me what they did to lower your numbers. I am going to the gym and i eat all what i am told. Maybe i'm not taking the meds right ? 7 am and 7 pm.
Sometimes, not all the time, chelation therapy helps take the stress off the pancreas to the point that folks are able to avoid insulin. However, this therapy, as all therapies, must be done under a doctor's supervision.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 01-09-2014, 11:46 PM
zoom6zoom's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,024
Likes: 18
Liked 277 Times in 142 Posts
Default

You need to eat smaller meals and more often. Don't go all day without eating. Remember that fruit juice can have even more sugar than a soda. Avoid all soda... especially the diet ones, they're even worse for you.

When I was diagnosed my A1C was almost 14, now it's under seven and I am totally controlled via diet.
__________________
Certified AR-15 / SIG Armorer.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 01-10-2014, 12:11 AM
rwsmith's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: (outside) Charleston, SC
Posts: 9,043
Likes: 8,272
Liked 4,207 Times in 2,565 Posts
Default If you A1cs are running......

If your A1cs are running 8.5, you need to be doing something (or things) different. I've had much better control when taking insulin than I ever did on oral med.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 01-10-2014, 12:39 AM
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: California
Posts: 1,006
Likes: 587
Liked 1,330 Times in 522 Posts
Default

I try to keep my carbs under 60 a day. I probably average closer to 80, but I can tell when I'm hitting it right; weight loss works, numbers stay down, and ironically, I don't get hungry. Excess carbs make you hungry especially when you're diabetic; screws up your insulin balance IIRC.

I highly recommend Taubes' "Why We Get Fat." Real eye-opener.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 01-10-2014, 12:41 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Delaware
Posts: 913
Likes: 707
Liked 420 Times in 187 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobf View Post
When I was diagnosed my blood sugar was 796. I started with insulin, Glipizide and Metformin. In a few months switched to Kombiglyze XR 2x daily. Within a few months I was down to 1 a day.

For me the meal and snack schedule is an important part of regulating my blood sugar. If I skip a meal or snack my blood sugar is going to go up.

3 meals a day plus 3 snacks. 220 carbs per day, I try to do 60 carbs per meal for 180, the other 40 for snacks.
I'm glad i did the 8 hour class. Counting carbs 60x3.. If i eat 3 x a day and very small snacks -i may drop these numbers. I'm holding at 120 to 140 all day due to eating in the am. It's only my 2nd day in over 40 years that i eat before 12. Sleep has a lot to do also. AGAIN--Due to working the midnight shift-i am up ------- here on S&W forum at 1am.....!!!!
Guys--thank you for the info. I know it's hard talking about our problem. All of you are a bunch of Stand Up Guys !!!!

Last edited by S&W357; 01-10-2014 at 12:48 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 01-10-2014, 11:48 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: East Texas Piney Woods
Posts: 85
Likes: 17
Liked 38 Times in 20 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fat tom View Post
I also take the Metformin 2x1000 and have to inject every day with insulin as well. Due to a severe back injury,most forms of exercise are impossible. I'm "pretty good" about what I eat and my glucose level is okay for the most part. The problem with diabetes is that it gets progressively worse,thus the more you have to do to combat it. If you are doing your part and your A1C continues to be 8.5 or above,TAKE the insulin! It ain't that bad. The biggest drawback is that it's EXPENSIVE and there ain't no such thing as generic insulin.
f.t.
WalMart sells a vial for about $25. Best price that I have seen.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 01-10-2014, 04:06 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 1,013
Likes: 55
Liked 227 Times in 152 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by perrazi View Post
counting carbs is a big thing too.
Don't just look at just how many carbs the *dish* has, look at the components of the dish. Example: I like hamburgers, but they are often high in carbs. However, while hamburger meat has virtually no carbs, hamburger buns are usually high in carbs. So, when I get a hamburger, I discard half the bun - whichever half is larger. Some places add high carb condiments. Leave them off.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Likes This Post:
  #26  
Old 01-10-2014, 05:03 PM
loutent's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Del Aware
Posts: 1,054
Likes: 228
Liked 648 Times in 182 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by K1500 View Post
I do not have diabetes, but I have lost tons of weight, feel better than I ever did, and saw EVERY SINGLE blood test marker improve dramatically by sticking to a low carb Atkins style plan. Fats, cholesterol, FBS, BP, A1C, etc. Every single one got substantially better.
Similar story here - just got fed up with how tired and out of shape I was about 2 years ago - started checking into low carb as I know some friends who swear by it. Bought a book "Wheat Belly" by William Davis, a cardiologist - it was a real eye opener. I cut out all grains, processed foods, added sugar and starches (including starchy vegetables like potatoes and beans.) Dropped about 60 lb in 1.5 years with little effort - the first 2-3 weeks were somewhat difficult because of the addictive nature of refined carbs, but after that it was easy - no hunger pangs, no cravings - some days I had to remind myself to eat something.

Best part is how much more energy I have - I can honestly say that I feel 10 years younger (I'm 66) - that alone is worth it all. Never thought I'd wear a 36 waist again!

It sounds difficult, but many people change their lifestyle like this - mainly because of the unbelievable positives it provides
__________________
Lou
Reply With Quote
The Following User Likes This Post:
  #27  
Old 01-10-2014, 05:32 PM
Doug M.'s Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Washington State
Posts: 3,163
Likes: 2,624
Liked 1,885 Times in 1,017 Posts
Default

I'm going to write some boring stuff about my history, but start with some rather firmly worded stuff about the need to make aggressive changes now.

8.5 is not merely unsatisfactory. It is dangerous. Anything over 6.5 is a serious issue, and you need to be back down to 6.0. There are subtle types of damage being done to lot of your body. Eyes, nerves, kidneys, blood vessels, ticker, and more. You will be more prone to various infections, too. By the time you notice them, you will have serious problems that will destroy your quality of life. You're being compelled to move to satisfy your wife's desire to see the grandkids etc - if you don't change the path on which you are traveling with the utmost aggression, you will not be able to enjoy the kids, even assuming you are alive. Go to youtube, and find the R. Lee Ermey/Full Metal Jacket introduction to boot camp. Apply that mindset to the changes you need to make.

The diabetic education class is a critical first step. Good for you, and as you note, you should have gone to it at the first indication. Due to my introduction to diabetes, I didn't know what I didn't know. The class was vital. Try like heck to have your GP refer you to a good endocrinologist as suggested above. The specific knowledge is good for you. Exercise is vital. I se you have some significant issues that limit your ability to engage is some forms of exercise, so a good rehab therapist and athletic trainer if you can find them (most MDs know jack about exercise physiology) who can help you find something you can do is a great investment. My guess is that walking in a pool (easier on your joints) might be in your future. Let's make sure you understand this: the things you have to do will require serious changes in your mindset, your life, and your allocation of money. If you are not willing to do this, plan on writing your will and checking out ASAP, or on having a miserable remainder to your life.

Why do I have such a vigorous attitude? My own history. I have written about it in a couple of settings, and will try to combine the S&W forum safe parts of it. Some was written to my siblings to educate them and their kids (themselves all adults); some in a PM exchange on another forum.
*
Shorter version: I do pretty well with the BG and everything else, partly because I am so active. It probably saved my life when I was discovered to have developed diabetes (June 2008) as a result of the prednisone I was on for a few months. 3.5 days on my backside with IV insulin and stuff - a 676 BG causes some major panty bunching among medics. My A1C at that time was 13.1 or so. I've been 6.2 or less, usually 6 or less, for 4.5 years now. For unknown reasons, the glomu-whatever (filters in the kidneys) had gotten too open and I was not processing protein, just pissing it out. The prednisone at pretty high doses for 4 months were needed to shrink them. Unfortunately, that is a stress test for the pancreas, and if you have the latent tendency, it will soon suck to be you.

The prednisone made me gain weight (35-ish pounds in about 6 weeks) AND get weak. FML. As the BG got higher, I become very prone to muscle cramps during exercise, so instead of using the exercise bike for 60 hard minutes, at about 22 minutes I had opposing muscles lock up. Painful. FML again. When I groused to the doctor and wanted to see if we could transition off the Prednisuck, they did some blood draws. One was over 400, which meant jack to me, but I did not even have any of the side effects. 2 were ok, the 4th was the 676. I was in the hospital and on IV insulin, plus a bolus to start, an hour after the doctor called. I started the diabetic education right away the first morning in the hospital. After 3.5 days I got out, and I don't recall ever getting below 200 while I was there. I was too used to being active.

When I went to the education class the day after release, they were advocating this starvation diet (maybe 1800 calories/day, when I would lose weight at 3K under normal conditions) and at least 30 minutes of walking as exercise (which is maybe what I would do with the dogs, prior to the real exercise). Most of the folks in the class were on the slow motion suicide by lifestyle plan. This was followed by the clot and all that crud, discovered that day. (I seemingly clotted as a result of laying on my butt in the bed, which may have been BG related.) 31 hours of not getting out of bed in the hospital except I refused to dump in a bedpan and have some poor stranger have to wipe my furry butt. 4 more days total, leaving me at 8 in an 11 day period. The two sets of diet restrictions meant I could only eat unrestricted amounts of meat and cheese. Hello cholesterol and pravstatin. FML cubed.

Several people smarter than I have told me the vast majority of people who experienced that would have croaked - like 95%, and only my lifestyle carried me. I was annoyed and inconvenienced. I have some tangential damage/after effects, like the last 10 pounds of the 35 are just refusing to come off. I had a herniated belly button due to the weight gain, leading to surgery. FML(4th). My vision already sucked; there was a little more damage that is hard to tell from the effects of age on a guy who started wearing glasses at 7 and was at or worse than 20/400 most of his life. There is a little additional nerve damage, not much, and some other hormonal/adrenal crud.

Considering what it could have been, no real complaints. The diabetes is dealt mostly by diet and exercise, with some metformin. I wear a 50-52 coat with < 38 trousers at 6'1 and 230, which is a pain in itself since that means nothing on the rack is close to fitting. It would be worse if I were in better shape! I am also a pharmacopea. My list of scrips is annoying, but not as bad as someone who really let themselves go for 40 years. I have a lot of affection and respect for the two specialists, whom I saw so much that I did not see my primary for over 2 years.

To the sibs: I've been doing some research about this since my predisone induced blood sugar issues, and more since I learned that mom has diabetic tendencies, specifically high BG. As I learned enough more to have new questions, I inquired of my endocrinologist. In sum: I think we are all at a higher risk because of genetics. This means that each of you (and your kids) need to be aware of the risk, means of monitoring, and risk reduction protocols.

In essence, those like me who end up developing type 2 as a result of the use of the steroid (prednisone), are already prone to the problem. My doctor described it as essentially a failed stress test for the pancreas. I suspect that some symptoms I had, such as occasional calf cramps on the exercise bike, were preliminary indications. That was likely a result of elevated blood sugar because unlike running, I needed to eat something or become far too hungry to continue. The good news is that because of my relatively aggressive exercise program, I was merely inconvenienced by all the things that happened.

I only survived it because of my lifestyle, and roughly 95% would have died. I should have been comatose, or at least convulsing. The BG level I had was well over 5X the presumed top of normal BG, and my A1C (the real issue) was WAY past the diabetic threshold. The nurses on my floor told me that I looked too healthy to be there. Well, goody.

I suspect that the kidney issue that resulted in being prescribed the prednisone to address the filter issue may have been related to diabetic symptoms, too. All together it means I don't get to improve my life insurance in any meaningful way. All of these things interrelate and mean I have some real interesting (in both breadth and number) prescriptions, in part because of the increased risk of other problems (blood pressure being the big one).

SO: the real point is that all of you (and your kids) may be well advised to pay a little more attention to diabetic symptoms and indicators than most other members of the population. I think that there is enough here to answer a question about "family history of diabetes" in the affirmative. The problem then becomes being an informed consumer. I did not know the extent of my ignorance when this all started. Like most people who are not diabetic or did not know of their risk, I did not have any incentive to know what any of this all meant.

First: the BG # one gets from a finger stick test is simply a moment in time, like a snapshot. Unless you have some really odd # that gets medical attention, it is not useful information. What you really want is the A1C. It essentially provides a more long term impression, showing your average BG over a period of months. (This is a CRUDE over-simplification.) For good info, see A1C and eAG: American Diabetes Associationģ. I strongly recommend that you get this test done at every physical, not less than once a year, if you can persuade your doctor. It also takes a finger stick, and about 5 minutes to process. If you are at or above 6.5, you need to start taking action. 7 is considered diabetic. When I was hospitalized, mine was over 13 - and if you look at the chart on that web page, you'll see it does not go that high! (My A1C for the last 4 years has ranged between 5.8 and 6.2.) I can control this largely by diet and exercise, as once I weaned off the prednisone I had less trouble with the insulin production and uptake. I do take some pills (metformin), but most of the control is personal.

When I started the education classes, I was aghast at what they considered appropriate exercise, until I considered the population in my class. The level is so low (work UP to 30 minutes/day of walking) as to be laughable, IMHO - generally less than the normal walking of the dogs before exercising! They also had me on what was essentially a starvation diet, because they were not used to an active person. That took some fixing.

The importance of exercise is two-fold. The first part is obvious - the more exercise, the more you use the sugar in your blood. That's simple. The other part, however, is that exercise improves/increases uptake of insulin at the cellular level. That means if you have limited insulin production, as I do and you are at risk for, what is there is used better. I have lost a lot of tolerance and recovery ability in the last few years, which I think is mostly age related, but may overlap with the illness(es). It's pretty hard to do a minimal CV workout (40 minutes at >80% of MHR, when I used to do an hour or more) followed by serious weights. I do what I can. Losing the last 10 pounds of what I gained with the prednisone has also been ugly. The first 25 came off in about 8 months.

I was lucky. An insurance physical caught the kidney issue, leading to the scrutiny. My lifestyle carried me through this. My doctors, frankly, are outstanding. Because I had one squared away specialist (nephrologist), I got connected to one of his colleagues (the endocrinologist) whom he holds in high regard. They work together and coordinate well enough that I call them co-conspirators. I did not even see my primary care doctor for the first 2 years or so of this, as they saw me so often they took care of all my medical needs while I was there. I canít say enough good about them. Good insurance helped.

Since I have ridden through this, about as well as I can, and we also have the indicators from momís symptoms, you should make use of this experience for your own benefit without going though all the fun I did. My vision, never good, is a little worse; I have a few small nerve problems; other things have been impacted a bit. Donít let yourselves get too far in to a problem by failing to learn from my experience and upgrading your self monitoring. One of the things I have seen since my first diabetic education is that most people are HORRID consumers of medical care. They donít know what they donít know, they are too apathetic to inquire of and work with their doctors, and then often too lazy to make use of the information. Itís crazy to see some of the people who do not listen to my doctors, and it is obvious they donít. Why bother going to the doctor then?
*
Back to the specifics again. I am a needle sissy. I HATE doing blood draws, getting shots, and all that. So what? I did the insulin thing for about 10 months as they weaned me off the prednisone (on something else now for that issue, which maintains control over it). Insulin is watery and thin, so the needles are not obnoxious. I had one shot daily of ... something I don't recall, and then an adjustable pen with about 250 units of insulin that I injected with meals after I did the carb math. Even while in the hospital, I insisted on learning to do my own, since I was going to have to. Compared to the blood thinners (and when I started it was IV Heparin, oral Coumadin, and injected Lovanox), easy. Lovanox was like shooting gear lube into my belly blub. Hated it, but it was only a week. I have some other endocrine damage and give myself another shot 3X/month. Big needle, and I live 180 miles from the clinic, so I do it at home. Also thick, think enough to try to push the plunger back up if I don't hold it.

I take Metformin ER, 1000 2 X daily with food. (Regular metformin made colonoscopy prep seem fun; take the ER.) For me, with diet and exercise, it works. I prioritize exercise over almost everything else that is optional in life. My wife and I don't go to movies much, most other social silliness is rare (maybe 1 event a year at most), etc. My dad got 10 good years of life after his first chest pains that would have been fatal if he had not lost weight and started exercising at 42 or so, and I have been to enough autopsies that I know what matters. You are at this moment, not able to do without insulin. Suck it up, and do what you gotta do. It's the only body you will ever have, and if you don't start doing what you need to, the costs will be awful. I went to a DOA about a year before I retired on a guy who was not all that old, but spent 30+ years dying from all of his diabetic issues and side effects. Multiple amputations, open heart surgery, and a generally bedridden horrid life. No thanks.
__________________
Watch your front sight.
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Like Post:
  #28  
Old 01-10-2014, 05:40 PM
dacoontz's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Southern Utah
Posts: 2,393
Likes: 240
Liked 400 Times in 155 Posts
Default

Uncagrunny summed it up on his first post. It doesn't have to be some complicated. Carbs equal lots of sugar, high fructose corn syrup equals lots of sugar, and then you have your simple sugars. If you consume too much of any of this than your fighting a losing battle, especially if your life is sedentary. Moderation in all things gentleman. A1C's are not a acute measure they are to see which ones of you are telling your doctors the truth about our carb intakes.

Unmanaged, Diabetes of any type will lead to a slow, uncomfortable demise. Drugs will not fix the problem as many of you have witnessed for yourselves. Diet and Exercise, just like the cave men used to do. It's crazy how healthy you become when you actually have to hunt and gather for your food. Humans haven't existed this long because of pharmaceutical companies, that is for sure.
__________________
Daniel #2322
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Like Post:
  #29  
Old 01-11-2014, 12:41 AM
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: California
Posts: 1,006
Likes: 587
Liked 1,330 Times in 522 Posts
Default

One California fad that has been of benefit is the "low-carb burger;" a hamburger or cheeseburger that is wrapped in iceberg lettuce leaves instead of a bun. Darn near zero carbs if you remember to dodge the ketchup (which is loaded with sugar). Several burger places out here have them on the menu, and most will make one by request if not.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 01-11-2014, 01:13 AM
Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 314
Likes: 151
Liked 288 Times in 121 Posts
Default

I've been struggling with diabetes for three years. My numbers are usually in the mid 200's. I tried metformin, but really struggled with my diet. About a month ago, the doctor told me about this new drug, which makes you pee out the excess suger. He gave me a months supply in samples, and it works. I've been on it for about two months and my numbers have been the best I've had. I'm between 130-150, and still not dieting like they want.
I've cut out the sugary drinks, and ice cream, but still like my pasta, and potatoes. The drug is called Invokana, and it's very new. Consult with your doctor, see what his opinion is.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 01-12-2014, 08:22 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Delaware
Posts: 913
Likes: 707
Liked 420 Times in 187 Posts
Default

My 4th day - eating good. I'm holding at 126. Morn. hours are high but protein in am is going from 180 to 126. Tomorrow i start the gym. just going to walk for 1/2 hour in am and then going back with the wife at 6 pm. She has been going for 6 years and has been paying $360 a year for me and i been there only 3 times in 6 years. I have to start going now,no more laying around the house and going to the gun range. I will get to see all these men that are hitting on my wife. So i'm told.lol
Can i carry when working out. ?????
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Like Post:
  #32  
Old 01-12-2014, 08:34 PM
Doug M.'s Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Washington State
Posts: 3,163
Likes: 2,624
Liked 1,885 Times in 1,017 Posts
Default

I carry pretty much all the time. If you have a carry method that is discreet enough, by all means, I would. No one at the gym needs to know, of course.

More important: good start.
__________________
Watch your front sight.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 01-12-2014, 09:06 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Delaware
Posts: 913
Likes: 707
Liked 420 Times in 187 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug M. View Post
I'm going to write some boring stuff about my history, but start with some rather firmly worded stuff about the need to make aggressive changes now.

8.5 is not merely unsatisfactory. It is dangerous. Anything over 6.5 is a serious issue, and you need to be back down to 6.0. There are subtle types of damage being done to lot of your body. Eyes, nerves, kidneys, blood vessels, ticker, and more. You will be more prone to various infections, too. By the time you notice them, you will have serious problems that will destroy your quality of life. You're being compelled to move to satisfy your wife's desire to see the grandkids etc - if you don't change the path on which you are traveling with the utmost aggression, you will not be able to enjoy the kids, even assuming you are alive. Go to youtube, and find the R. Lee Ermey/Full Metal Jacket introduction to boot camp. Apply that mindset to the changes you need to make.

The diabetic education class is a critical first step. Good for you, and as you note, you should have gone to it at the first indication. Due to my introduction to diabetes, I didn't know what I didn't know. The class was vital. Try like heck to have your GP refer you to a good endocrinologist as suggested above. The specific knowledge is good for you. Exercise is vital. I se you have some significant issues that limit your ability to engage is some forms of exercise, so a good rehab therapist and athletic trainer if you can find them (most MDs know jack about exercise physiology) who can help you find something you can do is a great investment. My guess is that walking in a pool (easier on your joints) might be in your future. Let's make sure you understand this: the things you have to do will require serious changes in your mindset, your life, and your allocation of money. If you are not willing to do this, plan on writing your will and checking out ASAP, or on having a miserable remainder to your life.

Why do I have such a vigorous attitude? My own history. I have written about it in a couple of settings, and will try to combine the S&W forum safe parts of it. Some was written to my siblings to educate them and their kids (themselves all adults); some in a PM exchange on another forum.
*
Shorter version: I do pretty well with the BG and everything else, partly because I am so active. It probably saved my life when I was discovered to have developed diabetes (June 2008) as a result of the prednisone I was on for a few months. 3.5 days on my backside with IV insulin and stuff - a 676 BG causes some major panty bunching among medics. My A1C at that time was 13.1 or so. I've been 6.2 or less, usually 6 or less, for 4.5 years now. For unknown reasons, the glomu-whatever (filters in the kidneys) had gotten too open and I was not processing protein, just pissing it out. The prednisone at pretty high doses for 4 months were needed to shrink them. Unfortunately, that is a stress test for the pancreas, and if you have the latent tendency, it will soon suck to be you.

The prednisone made me gain weight (35-ish pounds in about 6 weeks) AND get weak. FML. As the BG got higher, I become very prone to muscle cramps during exercise, so instead of using the exercise bike for 60 hard minutes, at about 22 minutes I had opposing muscles lock up. Painful. FML again. When I groused to the doctor and wanted to see if we could transition off the Prednisuck, they did some blood draws. One was over 400, which meant jack to me, but I did not even have any of the side effects. 2 were ok, the 4th was the 676. I was in the hospital and on IV insulin, plus a bolus to start, an hour after the doctor called. I started the diabetic education right away the first morning in the hospital. After 3.5 days I got out, and I don't recall ever getting below 200 while I was there. I was too used to being active.

When I went to the education class the day after release, they were advocating this starvation diet (maybe 1800 calories/day, when I would lose weight at 3K under normal conditions) and at least 30 minutes of walking as exercise (which is maybe what I would do with the dogs, prior to the real exercise). Most of the folks in the class were on the slow motion suicide by lifestyle plan. This was followed by the clot and all that crud, discovered that day. (I seemingly clotted as a result of laying on my butt in the bed, which may have been BG related.) 31 hours of not getting out of bed in the hospital except I refused to dump in a bedpan and have some poor stranger have to wipe my furry butt. 4 more days total, leaving me at 8 in an 11 day period. The two sets of diet restrictions meant I could only eat unrestricted amounts of meat and cheese. Hello cholesterol and pravstatin. FML cubed.

Several people smarter than I have told me the vast majority of people who experienced that would have croaked - like 95%, and only my lifestyle carried me. I was annoyed and inconvenienced. I have some tangential damage/after effects, like the last 10 pounds of the 35 are just refusing to come off. I had a herniated belly button due to the weight gain, leading to surgery. FML(4th). My vision already sucked; there was a little more damage that is hard to tell from the effects of age on a guy who started wearing glasses at 7 and was at or worse than 20/400 most of his life. There is a little additional nerve damage, not much, and some other hormonal/adrenal crud.

Considering what it could have been, no real complaints. The diabetes is dealt mostly by diet and exercise, with some metformin. I wear a 50-52 coat with < 38 trousers at 6'1 and 230, which is a pain in itself since that means nothing on the rack is close to fitting. It would be worse if I were in better shape! I am also a pharmacopea. My list of scrips is annoying, but not as bad as someone who really let themselves go for 40 years. I have a lot of affection and respect for the two specialists, whom I saw so much that I did not see my primary for over 2 years.

To the sibs: I've been doing some research about this since my predisone induced blood sugar issues, and more since I learned that mom has diabetic tendencies, specifically high BG. As I learned enough more to have new questions, I inquired of my endocrinologist. In sum: I think we are all at a higher risk because of genetics. This means that each of you (and your kids) need to be aware of the risk, means of monitoring, and risk reduction protocols.

In essence, those like me who end up developing type 2 as a result of the use of the steroid (prednisone), are already prone to the problem. My doctor described it as essentially a failed stress test for the pancreas. I suspect that some symptoms I had, such as occasional calf cramps on the exercise bike, were preliminary indications. That was likely a result of elevated blood sugar because unlike running, I needed to eat something or become far too hungry to continue. The good news is that because of my relatively aggressive exercise program, I was merely inconvenienced by all the things that happened.

I only survived it because of my lifestyle, and roughly 95% would have died. I should have been comatose, or at least convulsing. The BG level I had was well over 5X the presumed top of normal BG, and my A1C (the real issue) was WAY past the diabetic threshold. The nurses on my floor told me that I looked too healthy to be there. Well, goody.

I suspect that the kidney issue that resulted in being prescribed the prednisone to address the filter issue may have been related to diabetic symptoms, too. All together it means I don't get to improve my life insurance in any meaningful way. All of these things interrelate and mean I have some real interesting (in both breadth and number) prescriptions, in part because of the increased risk of other problems (blood pressure being the big one).

SO: the real point is that all of you (and your kids) may be well advised to pay a little more attention to diabetic symptoms and indicators than most other members of the population. I think that there is enough here to answer a question about "family history of diabetes" in the affirmative. The problem then becomes being an informed consumer. I did not know the extent of my ignorance when this all started. Like most people who are not diabetic or did not know of their risk, I did not have any incentive to know what any of this all meant.

First: the BG # one gets from a finger stick test is simply a moment in time, like a snapshot. Unless you have some really odd # that gets medical attention, it is not useful information. What you really want is the A1C. It essentially provides a more long term impression, showing your average BG over a period of months. (This is a CRUDE over-simplification.) For good info, see A1C and eAG: American Diabetes Associationģ. I strongly recommend that you get this test done at every physical, not less than once a year, if you can persuade your doctor. It also takes a finger stick, and about 5 minutes to process. If you are at or above 6.5, you need to start taking action. 7 is considered diabetic. When I was hospitalized, mine was over 13 - and if you look at the chart on that web page, you'll see it does not go that high! (My A1C for the last 4 years has ranged between 5.8 and 6.2.) I can control this largely by diet and exercise, as once I weaned off the prednisone I had less trouble with the insulin production and uptake. I do take some pills (metformin), but most of the control is personal.

When I started the education classes, I was aghast at what they considered appropriate exercise, until I considered the population in my class. The level is so low (work UP to 30 minutes/day of walking) as to be laughable, IMHO - generally less than the normal walking of the dogs before exercising! They also had me on what was essentially a starvation diet, because they were not used to an active person. That took some fixing.

The importance of exercise is two-fold. The first part is obvious - the more exercise, the more you use the sugar in your blood. That's simple. The other part, however, is that exercise improves/increases uptake of insulin at the cellular level. That means if you have limited insulin production, as I do and you are at risk for, what is there is used better. I have lost a lot of tolerance and recovery ability in the last few years, which I think is mostly age related, but may overlap with the illness(es). It's pretty hard to do a minimal CV workout (40 minutes at >80% of MHR, when I used to do an hour or more) followed by serious weights. I do what I can. Losing the last 10 pounds of what I gained with the prednisone has also been ugly. The first 25 came off in about 8 months.

I was lucky. An insurance physical caught the kidney issue, leading to the scrutiny. My lifestyle carried me through this. My doctors, frankly, are outstanding. Because I had one squared away specialist (nephrologist), I got connected to one of his colleagues (the endocrinologist) whom he holds in high regard. They work together and coordinate well enough that I call them co-conspirators. I did not even see my primary care doctor for the first 2 years or so of this, as they saw me so often they took care of all my medical needs while I was there. I canít say enough good about them. Good insurance helped.

Since I have ridden through this, about as well as I can, and we also have the indicators from momís symptoms, you should make use of this experience for your own benefit without going though all the fun I did. My vision, never good, is a little worse; I have a few small nerve problems; other things have been impacted a bit. Donít let yourselves get too far in to a problem by failing to learn from my experience and upgrading your self monitoring. One of the things I have seen since my first diabetic education is that most people are HORRID consumers of medical care. They donít know what they donít know, they are too apathetic to inquire of and work with their doctors, and then often too lazy to make use of the information. Itís crazy to see some of the people who do not listen to my doctors, and it is obvious they donít. Why bother going to the doctor then?
*
Back to the specifics again. I am a needle sissy. I HATE doing blood draws, getting shots, and all that. So what? I did the insulin thing for about 10 months as they weaned me off the prednisone (on something else now for that issue, which maintains control over it). Insulin is watery and thin, so the needles are not obnoxious. I had one shot daily of ... something I don't recall, and then an adjustable pen with about 250 units of insulin that I injected with meals after I did the carb math. Even while in the hospital, I insisted on learning to do my own, since I was going to have to. Compared to the blood thinners (and when I started it was IV Heparin, oral Coumadin, and injected Lovanox), easy. Lovanox was like shooting gear lube into my belly blub. Hated it, but it was only a week. I have some other endocrine damage and give myself another shot 3X/month. Big needle, and I live 180 miles from the clinic, so I do it at home. Also thick, think enough to try to push the plunger back up if I don't hold it.

I take Metformin ER, 1000 2 X daily with food. (Regular metformin made colonoscopy prep seem fun; take the ER.) For me, with diet and exercise, it works. I prioritize exercise over almost everything else that is optional in life. My wife and I don't go to movies much, most other social silliness is rare (maybe 1 event a year at most), etc. My dad got 10 good years of life after his first chest pains that would have been fatal if he had not lost weight and started exercising at 42 or so, and I have been to enough autopsies that I know what matters. You are at this moment, not able to do without insulin. Suck it up, and do what you gotta do. It's the only body you will ever have, and if you don't start doing what you need to, the costs will be awful. I went to a DOA about a year before I retired on a guy who was not all that old, but spent 30+ years dying from all of his diabetic issues and side effects. Multiple amputations, open heart surgery, and a generally bedridden horrid life. No thanks.
Thank you for taking the time to set me straight. i am determined to turn my situation around by totally changing my lifestyle. I hope it is not too late.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 01-13-2014, 11:09 AM
Doug M.'s Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Washington State
Posts: 3,163
Likes: 2,624
Liked 1,885 Times in 1,017 Posts
Default

Well, I'm just a test group of one, with good doctors, so take my words as advice, not gospel. I didn't know a darned thing when I started the trip. The first step is educating yourself to be a better consumer of medical information - lots of folks are not. If at all possible, try to get a referral to an endocrinologist whose practice is largely diabetes related. There are a lot of interactions that they will pick up on and about which they can educate you.

I think the 1X daily shot was Lantus - also thin and watery and no big deal. BTW, don't worry about dignity. I used to order meals and then go to the bathroom to inject when I was traveling with my wife; even on duty. No one ever gave a damn. A few picked up on the diabetic thing right away. Damage? I think it starts slowly, so you may not have a lot. If you do, you do. Take the other steps needed and drive on - at least it should not continue to get worse once you get a thumb on it. Once you learn about the subtle indicators you will start to perceive about when your BG is high, or low, and learn to test to confirm and then take steps, you will be amazed at how fast the progress will seem. I'd bet a lot that if you put in the effort to learn and act, the improved test results in 3 months will be amazing to you.

I have always been a bit of a glutton, and when younger could get away with it due to lifestyle. I would lose weight on a 3K calorie/day level. I got my Dad's sweet tooth and my mom's crummy pancreas, it seems. Rum Raisin ice cream at Wahl's (Pittsford, for the other folks from that part of NY)? By the truckload. Chinese buffet? URP. (I pretty much stay out of them now ... gotta know your weaknesses.) I still eat a lot more than most folks my age; some of the stuff and quantities I eat would probably make Dr. Bossypants (as I call her) launch into orbit. I gave up on other things, and take the trades I can. It's all about learning the basics and applying them to your body. I know your joints would not allow you to exercise the way I do, and I trained in the way I did for occupational reasons.
__________________
Watch your front sight.

Last edited by Doug M.; 01-13-2014 at 11:15 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 01-13-2014, 01:55 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Delaware
Posts: 913
Likes: 707
Liked 420 Times in 187 Posts
Default

Today was my first day at the gym. I eat this morn and my sugar was 137 all morn. I had lunch then went to the gym for 1 hour. just walked at 3.4 mph burnt 140 cal. I just took my sugar and it's 180. That's not right so i took it again 188. ??????
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 01-13-2014, 08:02 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2,913
Likes: 799
Liked 769 Times in 437 Posts
Default

also, if you have any other health issues, it affects the diabetes. if you have any chronic pain issues, the numbers will be up. there are so many things that affects this problem, that is why i say endocrinologist. most gp types just don't have the ongoing training needed. it is also a very personal disease,that is, it affects everyone differently. proper treatment for one person is not proper for someone else.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 01-13-2014, 08:15 PM
Skootertrash's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: West Texas Sandbills
Posts: 97
Likes: 16
Liked 54 Times in 28 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by S&W357 View Post
Today was my first day at the gym. I eat this morn and my sugar was 137 all morn. I had lunch then went to the gym for 1 hour. just walked at 3.4 mph burnt 140 cal. I just took my sugar and it's 180. That's not right so i took it again 188. ??????
Give it time. A year ago, my sugar was out of control and doc said if I don't get it under control soon, I would have to start insulin. I started going back to the gym, lost about 40 lbs and now I'm taking less than half of my meds to keep it under control.

I will spend 2-2 1/2 hours in the gym 4-6 hours a week, doing 40-50 mins cardio each visit and then 1-1.5 hours lifting weights. I have cut out of my diet most everything that is white. This includes foods made from flour, sugar, and potatoes. I have also included 2-4 protien shakes a day along with other supplements.

Last time I had my A1C checked, it was 6.1 and my sugar usually is in the high 80's to low 100's when checked. So again, be patient and give it time. Results won't happen overnight. Stick with it and again, give it some time.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Likes This Post:
  #38  
Old 01-13-2014, 08:21 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Delaware
Posts: 913
Likes: 707
Liked 420 Times in 187 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skootertrash View Post
Give it time. A year ago, my sugar was out of control and doc said if I don't get it under control soon, I would have to start insulin. I started going back to the gym, lost about 40 lbs and now I'm taking less than half of my meds to keep it under control.

I will spend 2-2 1/2 hours in the gym 4-6 hours a week, doing 40-50 mins cardio each visit and then 1-1.5 hours lifting weights. I have cut out of my diet most everything that is white. This includes foods made from flour, sugar, and potatoes. I have also included 2-4 protien shakes a day along with other supplements.

Last time I had my A1C checked, it was 6.1 and my sugar usually is in the high 80's to low 100's when checked. So again, be patient and give it time. Results won't happen overnight. Stick with it and again, give it some time.
That's very good numbers. How many Mg. are you on now ?
With numbers that good-have you asked your Dr. to take you off meds.?
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 01-13-2014, 08:27 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Delaware
Posts: 913
Likes: 707
Liked 420 Times in 187 Posts
Default

When i took my sugar after the gym is was high 180. I had dinner and took it 2 hours after. 107 -took it again 105. It's been like that. if i don't eat something---numbers go up fast. but when i eat -numbers go down. Lots i have to learn yet.. It seems that protein -lowers my sugar
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 01-13-2014, 08:32 PM
Skootertrash's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: West Texas Sandbills
Posts: 97
Likes: 16
Liked 54 Times in 28 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by S&W357 View Post
That's very good numbers. How many Mg. are you on now ?
With numbers that good-have you asked your Dr. to take you off meds.?
I was taking glybiride/metformin 2.5/500 2 tabs twice a day. I am now taking less than 2 tabs a day. If I don't take the meds, my sugar will increase, so I will probably be taking the meds the rest of my life, but in this case, less is better.

My BP was also off the charts and was taking 20 mg of lisinopril daily. That has been cut to 5 mg a day. FWIW, I'm 58 and had a total knee replacement just under 3 months ago.
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 01-13-2014, 08:36 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Delaware
Posts: 913
Likes: 707
Liked 420 Times in 187 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by perrazi View Post
also, if you have any other health issues, it affects the diabetes. if you have any chronic pain issues, the numbers will be up. there are so many things that affects this problem, that is why i say endocrinologist. most gp types just don't have the ongoing training needed. it is also a very personal disease,that is, it affects everyone differently. proper treatment for one person is not proper for someone else.
Yes, Dr. told me that pain affects diabetes. With back pain-2 surg. I also need knee replacement but i'm not having it down here in Delaware. I'm going to New York -Hospital of special surg. My Mom & Dad are 88 & 86 and they don't take any pills at all. I must of really screwed up my body. Smoked -pain pills and worked as a mechanic for 40 years. Never went to the gym. Growing up in the 60s & 70s-did a few other things...Paying for it now !!!!
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 01-13-2014, 09:53 PM
Doug M.'s Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Washington State
Posts: 3,163
Likes: 2,624
Liked 1,885 Times in 1,017 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by S&W357 View Post
When i took my sugar after the gym is was high 180. I had dinner and took it 2 hours after. 107 -took it again 105. It's been like that. if i don't eat something---numbers go up fast. but when i eat -numbers go down. Lots i have to learn yet.. It seems that protein -lowers my sugar
*
So many factors can play into this, and I have no clue. Just another reason to get a referral to an endocrinologist.
__________________
Watch your front sight.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 01-13-2014, 10:18 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: MA
Posts: 3,340
Likes: 1,096
Liked 2,090 Times in 1,114 Posts
Default

Doug M. has some really good advice. When I took my classes, the nurse asked us all to set goals for exercise. The other 6 people all said they'd try to work up to 20 minutes a day. I told her I was going to be consistently doing an hour a day on my bike. I don't think she believed me.

My doctor told me that while Metformin is helpful, exercise is the key to keeping things in check.

I exercise one hour at least 6 days a week. I alternate, doing on hour on the bike one day and an hour on the rowing machine the next. When the weather is good enough, I ride my bike outside for about 1:20. Riding outside is better, but it's also weather dependent.

I haven't lost that much weight, but I've converted a lot of fat to muscle. Fat actually weighs less than muscle, which a lot of people don't know.

What you want to do is burn off as much fat as possible. Metformin helps that process by inhibiting the release of Glycogen from the Liver. That forces your body to use the fat instead. Controlling what you eat is also part of the equation. If you use up enough of the fat, at some point the body will start to burn off the Glycogen as well.

You don't have to live like a monk, but you do have to pay attention to what you eat. What will work for me might not work for you. I've started eating whole wheat or multi grain breads, eat a lot of bran cereal, eat a lot more fruit, cut back on potatoes, and try to eat as little rice as possible. When I do eat rice, I try to get long grain, not white rice.

As others have said, I've cut way back on diet soda and drink ice tea (no sugar) and water.

As others have said, I'm doing this so I can have more time to spend with my grand kids.
__________________
Can open, worms everywhere.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 01-13-2014, 10:27 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Poynette, WI
Posts: 4,062
Likes: 5,918
Liked 654 Times in 420 Posts
Default

S&W357,
I'm not much help on diabetes, but have a couple pointers on
going to the gym. I've lifted free weights on and off since my teens.
After one of my innumerable lazy times, I saw some
doctor claim that weights would lower chloresterol. At the time,
I had just been tested for that,=223.
A month later, had another test for insurance purposes=173.
Also, pushing yourself to find out how heavy to lift is
a sure way to get laid-up and lose whatever benefit you had
achieved. The really important part of weights is form and range
of motion.
Sounds like you're doing everything right, now, so you have time
to experiment.
I wish you the best with your condition.
TACC1
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 01-13-2014, 10:35 PM
Grayback's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Lake Charm, Fla.
Posts: 20
Likes: 17
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by S&W357 View Post
When i took my sugar after the gym is was high 180. I had dinner and took it 2 hours after. 107 -took it again 105. It's been like that. if i don't eat something---numbers go up fast. but when i eat -numbers go down. Lots i have to learn yet.. It seems that protein -lowers my sugar
Your sugar goes up when you don't eat because the liver
"says hey we need more sugar in the body" and produces
more glucose. Goes down after eating because the liver
sees no reason to produce anymore glucose.....takes time
to work it all out. Good Luck
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 01-13-2014, 11:00 PM
loutent's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Del Aware
Posts: 1,054
Likes: 228
Liked 648 Times in 182 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by S&W357 View Post
When i took my sugar after the gym is was high 180. I had dinner and took it 2 hours after. 107 -took it again 105. It's been like that. if i don't eat something---numbers go up fast. but when i eat -numbers go down. Lots i have to learn yet.. It seems that protein -lowers my sugar
I am no expert in this but what you eat is critical - if you are having refined carbs of any kind (bread, starches, sugar - anything with a label of ingredients like corn flakes) it is a tough battle.

Pigs & cattle are fed grains (corn etc) to fatten them up - it will do the same to us.

Two slices of "healthy whole grain wheat bread" will spike your blood sugar more than a Snickers bar or 2 tsp of white table sugar.

The gov't still recommends "healthy whole grains" at the bottom of the pyramid but the diabetes and obesity rates are crazy - more "low fat" food is sold today than ever, but more people are obese and diabetic - crazy.

A low fat "diet" is a lie - it can never work unless you want to feel deprived and hungry.
__________________
Lou
Reply With Quote
The Following User Likes This Post:
  #47  
Old 01-14-2014, 12:49 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Delaware
Posts: 913
Likes: 707
Liked 420 Times in 187 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by loutent View Post
I am no expert in this but what you eat is critical - if you are having refined carbs of any kind (bread, starches, sugar - anything with a label of ingredients like corn flakes) it is a tough battle.

Pigs & cattle are fed grains (corn etc) to fatten them up - it will do the same to us.

Two slices of "healthy whole grain wheat bread" will spike your blood sugar more than a Snickers bar or 2 tsp of white table sugar.

The gov't still recommends "healthy whole grains" at the bottom of the pyramid but the diabetes and obesity rates are crazy - more "low fat" food is sold today than ever, but more people are obese and diabetic - crazy.

A low fat "diet" is a lie - it can never work unless you want to feel deprived and hungry.
In am -2 eggs with bacon-lunch -chicken and cheese -dinner lots of greens with a steak [cut the fat out]- Snacks- i have these peanuts butter n choc. protein bars. All less then 60 carbs a meal. Lots n Lots of water. I'm drinking 8 glasses a day. If i get hungry -i will steam up some broccoli with garlic. You can eat all the broccoli you want. I was big on fruit but not now. Even tho i can have 2 slices of bread 15 carbs each. Thats 30 carbs. That's 4 peanut butter n choc. bars. I was a big milk drinker. No more milk. Look at me -5 days ago i didn't know any of this.
I read two books .I can see how this is going to be a fight to the end. It can be done but for the rest of my life ? I'm buying a smoker. Start smoking fish.....
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 01-14-2014, 11:52 AM
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: California
Posts: 1,006
Likes: 587
Liked 1,330 Times in 522 Posts
Default

Don't cut the fat off your steak; the body will use fat for energy more readily than it can use protein (still need the protein for other functions), and that helps keep your blood-glucose under control.

Dietary fat is not as bad for you as has long been believed, and has little to do with serum cholesterol or weight gain. Tons of recent science has been showing that low-fat diets are unhealthy, primarily because they make you hungry for carbs because you are running low on easily-convertable fuel.

Well worth your time if you want to get a deeper understanding of what is currently known about diet and its effects on metabolism:
Start Here ę The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D. The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D.

& especially this article from that site:
How did we come to believe saturated fat and cholesterol are bad for us? ę The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D. The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 01-14-2014, 02:34 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Delaware
Posts: 913
Likes: 707
Liked 420 Times in 187 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by UncaGrunny View Post
Don't cut the fat off your steak; the body will use fat for energy more readily than it can use protein (still need the protein for other functions), and that helps keep your blood-glucose under control.

Dietary fat is not as bad for you as has long been believed, and has little to do with serum cholesterol or weight gain. Tons of recent science has been showing that low-fat diets are unhealthy, primarily because they make you hungry for carbs because you are running low on easily-convertable fuel.

Well worth your time if you want to get a deeper understanding of what is currently known about diet and its effects on metabolism:
Start Here ę The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D. The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D.

& especially this article from that site:
How did we come to believe saturated fat and cholesterol are bad for us? ę The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D. The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D.
It seems that the more protein i eat the lower my sugar. I when to the gym this morn because sugar was 190. I had hard boiled egg and did 45 min.walk. came back home -sugar was 106. I had lunch -went for a walk with the dog. at 2 pm today my sugar was 80. I never saw it that low. I go to the Dr. in 2 week [real Dr.]
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 01-14-2014, 02:53 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: MA
Posts: 3,340
Likes: 1,096
Liked 2,090 Times in 1,114 Posts
Default

In general I agree with you, but keep in mind that one of the things we want to do is burn off the fat on our bodies. While the fat on steak is tasty, it's not helping that goal. No need to be a fanatic about it, but some trimming is good.

Also, one of the things about protein is that it takes a lot of energy for the body to break it down and as such it doesn't produce a lot of energy. Again, this is where our body fat comes in to play.

A guy I know is a very serious biker. For a while he had a bike shirt that said "Powered by fat" on the back. He's not fat and that's because he bikes and does Nordic Skiing. Both use a ton of energy and if you have extra fat they will burn it off fast.

One thing I don't do is measure my BG on a daily basis. I discussed this with my doctor when he first made the diagnosis and we agreed. As someone else said, daily BG levels will vary and are of little value if you are orally controlled. The A1C is the important number and that's a trend over several months. When I was first diagnosed, I was tested every three months. At my last visit, the doctor told me that I only needed to be tested every six months.

What will work for BG control is different for everyone to some degree. Find what works for you and stick with it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by UncaGrunny View Post
Don't cut the fat off your steak; the body will use fat for energy more readily than it can use protein (still need the protein for other functions), and that helps keep your blood-glucose under control.

Dietary fat is not as bad for you as has long been believed, and has little to do with serum cholesterol or weight gain. Tons of recent science has been showing that low-fat diets are unhealthy, primarily because they make you hungry for carbs because you are running low on easily-convertable fuel.

Well worth your time if you want to get a deeper understanding of what is currently known about diet and its effects on metabolism:
Start Here ę The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D. The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D.

& especially this article from that site:
How did we come to believe saturated fat and cholesterol are bad for us? ę The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D. The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D.
__________________
Can open, worms everywhere.

Last edited by GaryS; 01-14-2014 at 02:56 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
The Lounge Thread, Diabetes-- Help in General Topics; I had Diabetes for 5 years - I'm taking Metformin 2x 1000. Dr. wants to put me on insulin. My ...
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dog with diabetes Up date WuzzFuzz The Lounge 22 09-13-2013 08:13 AM
Feline (or canine) diabetes DesertFox The Lounge 11 08-09-2013 03:36 PM
Anyone have experiance with a Dog that has Diabetes wheelgun28 The Lounge 23 08-07-2012 10:41 PM
Diabetes Supplies (?) oldfella The Lounge 7 10-31-2009 07:22 PM

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
smith-wessonforum.com tested by Norton Internet Security smith-wessonforum.com tested by McAfee Internet Security

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:52 PM.


© S-W Forum, LLC 2000-2015
Smith-WessonForum.com is not affiliated with Smith & Wesson Holding Corporation (NASDAQ Global Select: SWHC)