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  #1  
Old 06-08-2009, 04:54 PM
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Default Tube fed .22 rifles?

I'm thinking about getting a tube fed .22 and wondering what my options are? I would likely need one that is readily able to take a scope as my eyes are not so sharp anymore.

I think it is the older Marlin model 60 that is very popular in this category? Do they still make these anymore?

What other tube fed options for .22 rifle?

Thanks
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Old 06-08-2009, 05:03 PM
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I am a big fan of the Marlin 39 series. Own three myself, including the now rare carbine Mountie.

It's a full size lever action, extremely accurate and top-cabin quality. Pricey for a .22 but well worth it in every detail.

Nayth
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Old 06-08-2009, 05:09 PM
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I've got two Henry lever guns, one standard rifle, the other a 16 inch large loop carbine. Love both of them, and they've fed everything I've given them so far.
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Old 06-08-2009, 05:10 PM
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There's many tube fed options. Semi-auto? Bolt action? Lever action? Most are able to be scoped. It's pretty much what type of action you prefer and how much you want to spend.
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Old 06-08-2009, 05:18 PM
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You absolutely cannot go wrong with a Marlin 39. If you have a hankering for such a jewel, get an older model. Here is my Mountie - and do visit this thread, and get hooked. http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=261635



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Old 06-08-2009, 05:49 PM
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Quote:
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I've got two Henry lever guns, one standard rifle, the other a 16 inch large loop carbine. Love both of them, and they've fed everything I've given them so far.
+1 on the Henry. Very dependable & the bride love shootin' it.
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Old 06-08-2009, 05:55 PM
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I have a Marlin M39, the 1870-1970 Centennial version. It has an octagon barrel and a straight stock. Great gun.
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Old 06-08-2009, 05:56 PM
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Only caution with tube fed rifle is you have to be a bit more safety conscious. Clearing the rifle involves more than merely removing the magazine and pulling back the bolt.
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Old 06-08-2009, 05:59 PM
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Sorry, should have been more specific on the action.

I'm looking for either a semi-auto or lever action.
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Old 06-08-2009, 06:01 PM
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I have a Winchester 62A pump. It is sweet. Taurus and Rossi both build replicas of them. Might be a good choice.
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Old 06-08-2009, 06:06 PM
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Default Remington 552

Wayne,
If you don't spending a little more you might check out the Remington 552. Extremely reliable, shoots shorts, longs & long rifles. Walnut stock with cut checkering.

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Old 06-08-2009, 07:04 PM
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So many good choices...you can't go wrong with a tube fed .22.

Depends on the money you want to spend, and how much you want to spend too...

If you can afford it, a Marlin 39, a Winchester 62 (if it is in good shape) or a Winchester 9422 or Browning BL-22 are the tops of the line in my book. A Taurus or Rossi will work in the place of a Winchester pump .22, but I recommend having it recrowned if needed but you will definitely need a set of Marbles or Lyman sights for it- the factory ones are too coarse for accurate plinking. Many people love the little Henry rifles, and they shoot great- but I just personally can't get over the pot metal receiver and it being a copy of the Ithaca. You may want to take look at them.

Secondly, I'd recommend any of the bolt action tube fed guns- Remington 341 or any in this series, Marlin tube fed bolt action, or even one of the good shooting Mossberg bolt rifles if you by chance find one.

Lastly, the semi auto category- the sometimes maligned Marlin 60 is a great gun if you keep it clean, I own one that shoots without a hiccup. Or you can grab a J.M. Browning design in the Browning Auto-22 or perhaps a Winchester 63. Both tube fed, but from the stock.

That's as much as I can throw out in one thing. Of all of the guns mentioned above, I like my Remington 341P (peep sight) and the 9422.
They always go to the range.
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Old 06-08-2009, 07:08 PM
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Yes they still make the Marlin 60. I fired a new one just last week and was very impressed with the way it handled, I got to shoot a spanky new 10/22 at the same time and for me the Marlin was the better of the two rifles.
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Old 06-08-2009, 07:17 PM
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Marlin 39'As are nice



Or maybe you can find an el cheapo Winchester 250 Deluxe



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Old 06-08-2009, 07:23 PM
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C&L, very nice wood on the Winchester.
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Old 06-08-2009, 07:39 PM
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Remington 552 Speedmaster. I have worn out 2 Marlin model 60's. Seems like when they work they are awsome, but when they start acting up you can't (or at least I can't) get them to function properly. (Jamming). I have only owned one speedmaster and for me it has been flawless with 22 LR. not so great with shorts functions ok but not so accurite.
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Old 06-08-2009, 08:12 PM
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Hi:
I always liked the Remington Model 550 semi-auto. This Model accepts .22 Shorts, Longs, or Long Rifles cartridges inter-changable. Also grooved for a scope.
This Model might not be a current Factory Model. You could locate a nice used one at a Gun Shop or one of the Auction Sites.
Jimmy
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Old 06-08-2009, 08:30 PM
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I am also a fan of the Remington 552. My dad had one when I was growing up there is no telling how many squirrels and rabbits I killed with it.

My favorite, though, is the Browning BL-22. Bought one with my first paycheck from a summer job in high school back in '79 and still have it. Works flawlessly with all flavors of shorts or long rifles. I always knew it was accurate, but I put a 4X scope on it about 10 years ago and it really shows out now. The short throw lever, about 45 degrees, means you can produce follow up shots much quicker than with most other .22 lever guns because your thumb never leaves the stock when you lever it. Great feature.

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Old 06-08-2009, 09:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldfella View Post
You absolutely cannot go wrong with a Marlin 39. If you have a hankering for such a jewel, get an older model.
I have never really thought about a Marlin .22 but a friend of mine, who is selling off some of his guns, has an almost mint 1952 production Marlin 39A. He's not 100% sure he wants to part with it, but I need to see him next time I visit my parents to buy some other guns and I have a feeling he'll let it go. Should be a fun little plinker!
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Old 06-08-2009, 09:35 PM
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Yes Marlin still makes the Model 60. Its a great .22 !
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Old 06-08-2009, 11:30 PM
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I've got a Winchester 9422 - tube fed, grooved for scope, very accurate. I highly recommend - IF you can find one. Older models preferred.
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Old 06-08-2009, 11:55 PM
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Winchester Model 190. Over a third of a century on mine and countless bricks of .22LR. Still on target @50 and has never needed repair nor replacement of any parts.
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Old 06-09-2009, 12:02 AM
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I have had several tube .22's over the years, starting with an old Stevens Buckhorn bolt action that I still miss. Then I had a Winchester 1906, I have also had a Marlin 60 (shot everything put through it), and a Winchester 74. I prefer tube fed .22's to box mags any day.
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Old 06-09-2009, 12:09 AM
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or if you want something really different......
how about a springfield 87M....
fullsize, accurate, and just different, not many out there, but...... sure to draw a crowd at the range.......


I lucked out and have two of them....#73 & #82...
in pic # 82 is apart having it's stock refinished.....
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Old 06-09-2009, 12:20 AM
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My first gun was a Winchester model 250 lever action. It will shoot shorts, longs and long rifles. You can't shoot CB caps in it, as they will get stuck in the action. Occasionally they're available on GB.

I also have a Mossberg model 380 semi-auto that I recently bought in used condition. It appears to be in great shape, but I've only cycled ammo through it (with no problems).
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Old 06-09-2009, 12:31 AM
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My first gun was a Marlin 39 that my Dad bought new in about 1950. No "Micro Groove" rifleing. Best .22 I have ever handled. Still have it, but haven't shot it in years. I need to get it out to the range.
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Old 06-09-2009, 12:42 AM
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I have 2 . The 1st is a Montgomery wards ?# ( looks like a Marlin) and the 2nd is a Noble pump action. I haven't shot either one in a long time. I usually use my sons Winchester 69a or a Ruger 77/22 when I want to shoot 22
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Old 06-09-2009, 06:48 AM
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Semi-autos or levers. Where to start?

Listing my favorites; semi-autos first:

Stevens / Springfield 87 and 87M; Savage 6 -- The so-called "Gill Guns" or "Click-Clacks" because of the trademark slots on the left side of the receiver and the characteristic sound the guns make when fired. When the trigger is pulled and held, the fired cartridge pushes back the bolt and the trigger mechanism holds the bolt back ("click") until the trigger is released and the bolt flies forward, feeding the next cartridge ("clack"). Pulling the trigger fires the next cartridge and repeats the process. These guns date to pre-WWII and they are often available used ranging from $75 to $150. Generally VERY reliable and remarkably accurate if reasonably clean and the springs are in good shape.

High Standard A102, A1041, and Sears Model 25 -- The later-made High Standard version of the Stevens / Springfield 87; Savage 6; same "click-clack" mechanism, but parts do not interchange. Generally VERY reliable and remarkably accurate if reasonably clean and the springs are in good shape.

Remington 552 Speedmaster -- One of the few semi-autos that will fire 22 Shorts (high speed shorts) in semi-auto, FWIW. Unless having been removed by a former owner, these have a stamped sheet metal empty case deflector covering the ejection port. It is good range ettiquete to keep these deflectors mounted; the shooter at the bench to your right will be SHOWERED with hot 22 brass if the deflector has been removed. Extremely reliable, even when considerably filthy from fired 22 cartridge residue. One of the few semi-autos that will cycle Wolf Match Target. Prices on used examples tend to start around $200 and go up, depending on condition. A $200 finish-worn example will generally shoot as well as an almost-new $450 used shiny-stocked 552 BDL.

Remington 550, 550-1, 550-2 -- The earlier version of the Remington 552, and considerably different in internal design and construction. The 550 will cycle high-spped 22 shorts and Wolf Match Target if reasonably clean and lubricated. Prices sometimes start below that of the low end for the 552 Speedmaster, but condition generally reflects pricing in the $125-$200 range. These are older, pre-WWII guns and have generally seen more use than a typical newer 552. High-end prices can rival that of new 552s (~$500) for NRA VG and Ex examples.

Mossberg 51 and 151 -- These are quintessential Mossberg; orange-tinted stock finish, grooved plastic pistol grip trigger guard, and remarkable accuracy. The 51 is the earlier version with slightly different internals and larger "knob" type cocking handle. Both feed from the buttstock with a teardrop-shaped cutout feed port in the right side of the stock. The spring loaded follower tube is withdrawn from the buttplate to uncover the feed port. The 51/151 comes in two basic configurations, half-stock with a 24" or 26" barrel, and the light, handy, "M" or military-appearing Mannlicher-style stock with a 20" barrel. Equally reliable as the guns mentioned above if kept clean and the cartridge feed stop is kept lubricated. If not, the 51/151 tends to double-feed. Most examples I've handled or owned exhibit the characteristically excellent Mossberg accuracy. Prices on used Mossbergs are climbing due to increasing interest and collector demand, so the 51/151 can be found anywhere from $100-$125 at the low end to as high as $300+ at the high end for beautiful examples.

Ruger 10/22 -- Everybody is familiar with the ubiquitous 10/22 and it's trademark club of a wooden stock, and a universe of aftermarket goodies. I prefer the filled-out lightweight black polymer factory stock (not the one with the hollowed-out butt area with "Ruger" molded in both sides). What else can I say? It's a 10/22 with generally decent accuracy and reliability and not much personality when compared to the classic 22 semi-autos mentioned above, no offense to 10/22 owners. I have three myself, but I shoot the classics much more often.

Marlin 60 -- Great when new, cranky when old, well used, or dirty. I own a new stainless Ducks Unlimited Marlin 60 right now, but have got rid of a couple earlier examples that I got tired of playing with to keep running well. IMO, the Marlin 60 just seems to "wears out" a bit faster than other 22LR semi-autos. Earlier versions had a different cartridge feed block mechanism that was prone to issues, and later models have improved feed guides. My personal "jury" is still out on the longevity of the "improved" Model 60s. My advice if you own a 60 -- clean it after every use to remove wear-inducing grit and gunk.



Regarding 22 leverguns, I have three favorites and I like them all equally for different reasons:

Marlin 39, particularly the 20" 39M "Mountie" -- short and handy, rugged Marlin construction and generally reliable performance and great accuracy. Lever has a comparatively long throw. The 39 is still made by Marlin, but prices on used 39s and 39Ms in particular tend to be in excess of $300, and some examples can command as much as $500 or higher. Exceedingly well-made, the Marlin 39 is THE definitive American 22LR levergun, with apologies to Winchester 94/22 owners. I've owned maybe eight 39s, and still own a 24" 39A, two 20" 39Ms, and a 16" 39TDS.

Marlin 57 Levermatic -- Made from the late 50s to the early 70s, these guns have a very short-throw action consisting mostly of stampings and pins with die-cast cartridge guides. They are hammerless and generally "bulky" in appearance but handle well from the shoulder. The short-throw lever provides for follow-up shots without removing the strong hand from the pistol grip stock. I have a 57 (22LR) and 57M (22 Magnum) and both exhibit phenomenal accuracy. The similar Model 56 is "clip" magazine fed instead of tube fed like the 57.

Browning BL22 -- Another short-throw levergun that's been mentioned above, and probably my favorite 22LR levergun due to that ultra-fast short throw. Like the Marlin 56/57, the lever throw is so short, your strong hand can remain on the straight wrist of the stock. Follow-up shots are nearly as fast as with a semi-auto. Still made by Miroku in Japan for Browning. Used examples can be had for betw. $300 and $450 depending on condition and if Grade 1 plain Jane, or "fancy" Grade 2 with light-coverage scroll "engraving" in the receiver sidewalls. I've had a Grade 1 BL22 since the late 80s, and it sees regular use.

Just my take on the world of 22 semi-autos and leverguns, YMMV. Point is, you don't have to go new or "new design" to own a solid-performing SA or lever rifle in 22LR. There are some comparatively low-priced "vintage" designs out there on dealer shelves and tables, and on auction sites for consideration that will serve you well. Example: I was in the right place at the right time twice in the past two months and picked up another High Standard A102 Carbine "Gill Gun" for $100 and a Mossberg 151M for $145, both nice used guns with only a few handling marks picked up over the past 40-45 years. Two weeks ago I found a really NICE Marlin 57M 22 Magnum Levermatic in a local trader paper for $200, and asking prices on these can be as much as $300-$400 or higher. Nice used 22 semi-autos and leverguns are out there; just be prepared to clean out 40-50 years worth of accumulated crud once you take your new toy home. I've learned that Americans don't clean their 22s.

Noah
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Old 06-09-2009, 12:38 PM
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Thanks for the replies, I didn't realize there were that many options out there. I have one tube fed semi auto that I inherited from my grandfather at an early age and would like to add another semi or lever action.

The one I have is a J.C. Higgins model 30 from Sears, Roebuck and Co. Cocking lever on the left, ejection port on the right and has sling that retracts into the stock. This has been the most reliable .22 semi-auto over the years and has not had a particularly easy life. When I was young I was not much concerned with cleaning the gun but it just kept on ticking and was surprisingly accurate. Though the action does seem to be getting a little lethargic lately.

This may be a version that Noah outlined in his post? I don't know if J.C. Higgins was an actual firearms manufacturer or if it is a re branded Stevens or something.
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Old 06-09-2009, 12:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steave View Post
I have never really thought about a Marlin .22 but a friend of mine, who is selling off some of his guns, has an almost mint 1952 production Marlin 39A. He's not 100% sure he wants to part with it, but I need to see him next time I visit my parents to buy some other guns and I have a feeling he'll let it go. Should be a fun little plinker!
Oh, yeah, Steave - If necessary, get on our knees and beg him to sell it to you.

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Old 06-09-2009, 01:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne02 View Post
. . . The one I have is a J.C. Higgins model 30 from Sears, Roebuck and Co. Cocking lever on the left, ejection port on the right . . .
. . . and wood panels extending back from the forend and covering the sides of the receiver, right?

That was made for Sears by High Standard. That model was not catalogued by High Standard under their own name.

Sears bought many guns from High Standard, Marlin, Savage/Stevens, etc. and "store-badged" them either "J C Higgins," "Ted Williams," or simply, "Sears."

Ted Williams was a baseball player who lent his name to Sears sporting goods, anf J C Higgins was actually a Sears accounting executive.

Sears also owned a controlling interest in High Standard at one point before deciding to exit the firearms market for good.

HTH,

Noah
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Old 06-09-2009, 01:33 PM
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Quote:
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. . . and wood panels extending back from the forend and covering the sides of the receiver, right?

HTH,
Noah
Yes, that's the one. Thanks for the info.
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Old 06-09-2009, 05:06 PM
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In a lever .22 I recommend the Browning BL-22 -- not an inexpensive rifle -- you can easily mount a scope, but why?

For less money, there are the Henry lever rifles.

for old, there were a few Mossberg tube fed .22 bolt action rifles, though they had loong barrels (heavy to carry). Many came with excellent peep sights.
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Old 06-09-2009, 05:56 PM
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Remington still shows the 572 Fieldmaster pump rifle in their catalog. Haven't seen one in a store lately, though. Nice gun! Shoots shorts, longs, or long rifle.
They still catalog the smoothbore version of it for shotshells, but doesn't seem too useful for most people.

Myron
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Old 06-09-2009, 07:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldfella View Post
Oh, yeah, Steave - If necessary, get on our knees and beg him to sell it to you.

Pete
LOL, I'm pretty sure he'll let it go, and if not now, then he will eventually sell it to me. Funny, I didn't even think of it until posting this, the other gun I am buying from am when I see him is a Winchester 72A, another tube fed .22; I already have a very nice 72A, but another on can't hurt. He also has a pretty nice Winchester 1890 in .22 LR, I just can't decide if I want to pay what he's asking for it.

A fellow just can't have too many .22's, be they tube or mag fed, lever, semi auto, bolt or pump!
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Old 06-09-2009, 07:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thirties View Post
for old, there were a few Mossberg tube fed .22 bolt action rifles, though they had loong barrels (heavy to carry). Many came with excellent peep sights.
Yep; got one. Very heavy, indeed.

Mine not only has the peep sights with the variable aperture rear sight, it has the "Swiss Army knife" front sight AND the factory scope.

Tiny tube; about 10-15mm, externally adjusted no less.
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Old 06-09-2009, 07:33 PM
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This is my favorite and most accurate tube feed.

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Old 06-09-2009, 08:27 PM
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I'm a big fan of the Browning BAR-22 with the straight stock. It's made in Japan and was around during the early 80s. Kinda pricey now but I've had one for a long time.
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Old 06-09-2009, 08:39 PM
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Tube feeders??......Remington 241 (absolute best IMHO) Marlin 39s, Remington 121

Lots of fun with these!
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Old 06-09-2009, 09:02 PM
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Quote:
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This is my favorite and most accurate tube feed.

I had the identical rifle when I was a kid, maybe twelve or thirteen, I bought it from my uncle; I actually manage to break the stock and test the Remington lifetime warranty and they replaced it without any problems. I traded it off for something, no idea what.
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Old 06-09-2009, 09:56 PM
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Let us not foget "pumps" but then again you have to have the legs for them.
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Old 06-09-2009, 11:32 PM
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Nylon 66
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Old 06-10-2009, 02:00 PM
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Default Marlin 60

I love my semi-automatic Marlin 60. Got it at Wal-Mart for $130 last summer. Shoots as fast as you pull the trigger and haven't had a misfire.
Love it.
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Old 06-16-2009, 05:36 PM
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Went looking this morning for a tube fed lever or semi at the most logical shop that might have one, and no joy.

Did the Remington 552 come in more than one barrel length?

Same thing on the Browning BL-22 was this in one barrel length?

Thanks

Last edited by Wayne02; 06-16-2009 at 05:39 PM.
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Old 06-16-2009, 06:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne02 View Post

Did the Remington 552 come in more than one barrel length?

Same thing on the Browning BL-22 was this in one barrel length?

Thanks

AFAIK, yes to both. Can't recall offhand what the lengths were, I'm guessing 24" for the 552 and either 18" or 20" for the BL-22.

Noah
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Old 06-16-2009, 06:54 PM
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If a little extra money is not a real concern, I'd recommend the Winchester model 63. Tube fed but through the butt. The later versions have grooves for scope mounting. I think they stopped making them in 1959. A fantastic little .22lr semiauto.
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Old 06-16-2009, 06:54 PM
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The 552 did come in two barrel lengths. Older ones were a full rifle length. Newer ones are more carbine like. I've owned both and prefer the shorter barrel. Sorry, I don't recall the exact lengths.
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Old 06-16-2009, 07:56 PM
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I posted this on another thread and then found this one so here is my first gun, one more time. Winchester (1963) Model 250 Tube Fed Lever action, with the Bushnell scope.

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Old 06-17-2009, 01:57 PM
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Well I've just about run out of air speed and altitude in the local search for:

Marlin 39A
Marlin .357 lever
Browning BL-22
Remington 552
S&W model 41
( I know, I expanded the list beyond the .22's)

I had hoped to get this done by the end of the week but only have one lead so far.

I have found one Marlin 39A new for $530. I don't know if these new models are less desirable then the older ones or not?

Edited to add: I found a second new 39A but I don't really care for that 24" barrel. Can they be cut down to 20"?

Last edited by Wayne02; 06-17-2009 at 03:21 PM.
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Old 06-17-2009, 02:48 PM
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Here are my three tubes. All winchesters. The 63, 1890, and dads old 61. The 63 has a tube in the butt stock, the 1890 was 22 WRF that I had rechambered to shoot 22 WMRF, Dad bought the 61 in the late 1930s. It is in 22 LR, and has the rare octogon barrel. He was 6 ft 5"s and lengthend all his stocks. I learned to shoot on that gun.





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