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Old 11-24-2011, 02:40 PM
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Default 38-357 magnum primers

I plan on reloading both of the calibers. Which primers do I need?
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Old 11-24-2011, 02:46 PM
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Small pistol primers and maybe small pistol magnum primers.The recipe will specify which to use.Be very wary of recipes on the net.I stick with published reloading manuals.
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Old 11-24-2011, 03:00 PM
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for 357 i use alliant 2400 and a std. primer, a mag primer is not needed for this most accurate and slow burning powder. for 38 i use almost exclusively unique also with a std. primer. i like cci or fed. but lately i have been using wolf primers. they seem to do well, but i would not trade them for cci or fed. the only problem i see with them is they are tight going in the case and a little hard if you are using a light hammer spring.

Last edited by olskool; 11-24-2011 at 03:04 PM.
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Old 11-24-2011, 03:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay View Post
Small pistol primers and maybe small pistol magnum primers.The recipe will specify which to use.Be very wary of recipes on the net.I stick with published reloading manuals.
I totally agree with this statement unless you have personal experience that says otherwise!
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Old 11-24-2011, 04:18 PM
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as others have mentioned...look at what your recipe calls for
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Old 11-24-2011, 04:51 PM
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The reloading manual says Winchester W.S.P. for 38 and Winchester W.S.P.M. for 357 magnum. What does that mean? I prefer federal when loading a rifle.
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Old 11-24-2011, 05:04 PM
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WSP= Winchester Small Pistol; WSPM= Winchester Small Pistol Magnum.
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Old 11-24-2011, 08:43 PM
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Never had the need for magnum primers in pistol or rifle. Most accurate loads will be about 70% of maximum, it has been for me. Been reloading since '77.
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Old 11-24-2011, 09:49 PM
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Depends on the powder used. You need regular small pistol for 38 special.

For 357 magnum some powders require a small pistol magnum primer like H110 or Win 296, HS 6 works better also with mag primers.

Any brand will work. Hodgdon Powder lists a Magnum, primer in all their magnum loads for consistency even though some powders like HP 38 do not need it.

If you use 2400 for your magnums you do not need mag primers.
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Old 11-25-2011, 01:46 AM
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Usually I would agree to follow the load manuals but in the case of primers it's not that important, especially in handgun loads. A standard SPP for the most part is the same from most manufacturers.

As for following the manuals as to using a standard or magnum primer, that's not always the best idea either. For simplicity most tests are now done using magnum primers will all powders in a magnum round and standard primers for all powders in non-magnum rounds. It may be easier for the testers but it's not the best data for reloaders.

The need for a magnum primer is dependent upon the powder you're using, not the caliber. You really only need a magnum primer when using hard to ignite slower ball powders like W296/H110, HS-6, HS-7 and the like. You also might need a magnum when using the ammo in VERY cold weather. (like 30 below cold)
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Old 12-03-2011, 07:42 PM
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All ball powders, regardless of burn rate, need magnum primers. This is because the speed of the powder is governed by the coating on ball powders, rather than the physical properties of the powder granules. Very simply, ball powders need more fire to begin combustion than extruded powders.

Alliant 2400 is not a ball powder, despite it's relatively small granules. It lights pretty easily, hence no need for the extra fire of the magnum primer.
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Old 12-03-2011, 09:15 PM
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I agree that the primer specified for the data being used is what you should use generally. When given the choice, I will use the data provided by the powder manufacturer rather than from bullet manufacturers or other published sources such as magazine articles.

Contrary to what others have said about 2400 not needing magnum primers, both Alliant, and Hercules have recommended for years the Federal #200 Magnum primer. Only recently have they changed the recommendation to the CCI 500 for some reason. At the same time the maximun loads were reduced by from 3% to 5%!
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Old 12-04-2011, 01:07 AM
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Sure, the magnum primer will work fine, no doubt about that. I've demonstrated to myself that it's simply not required, and I find the non-magnum primer somewhat more accurate.
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Old 12-04-2011, 06:39 PM
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Would some one explain to me why the average reloader thinks he knows more about reloading than professional ballisticians?

The guys who write the manuals are highly trained and experienced professionals. I should think they know a thing or two about what they do.

Before any one flames me for this understand I know that standard primers will light off all powders. The reason for magnum primers is, I'm told, that some powders require the added fire for consistent ignition. Consistent ignition equates to more consistent pressures which lead to better accuracy.

My advice to all new reloaders is get several reloading books and FOLLOW them. I don't want to break any ones rice bowl here but following the loading data from someone with a screen name can be hazardous. Follow the books.

Rant over.

Pecos
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Old 12-04-2011, 09:45 PM
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And some folks get much better at shooting their keyboards than their guns, and are less good at working in common sense and experience into their high minded tomes.
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Old 12-11-2011, 09:21 AM
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Your comment above should be a signature line! Great point!
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Old 12-11-2011, 02:33 PM
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My default is to try to use the same primer that was used in development of the load. If not by brand, at least by category of magnum or standard.

I also heed the recommendations of the primer manufacturer and avoid using Remington 1 1/2 primers in 357 mag, 357 Sig, and 40 S&W cartridges. If they take the time to print it right on the side of the carton, I accept it.

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Old 12-11-2011, 06:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pecos Bill View Post
Would some one explain to me why the average reloader thinks he knows more about reloading than professional ballisticians?

The guys who write the manuals are highly trained and experienced professionals. I should think they know a thing or two about what they do.

Before any one flames me for this understand I know that standard primers will light off all powders. The reason for magnum primers is, I'm told, that some powders require the added fire for consistent ignition. Consistent ignition equates to more consistent pressures which lead to better accuracy.

My advice to all new reloaders is get several reloading books and FOLLOW them. I don't want to break any ones rice bowl here but following the loading data from someone with a screen name can be hazardous. Follow the books.

Rant over.

Pecos
Please explain to me why the experts list a standard SPP for HS-6 in a .38 Special and a Magnum SPP for HS-6 in a .357 Magnum?

IMO and experience HS-6 in all applications is much more accurate and consistent when combined with a magnum primer, not a standard primer. No need to be an engineer to know when your ammo is more accurate.
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Old 12-15-2011, 05:28 AM
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For the most part if you are shooting the Magnum bullets at paper or steel targets, standard pistol primers should do the job. If you are using the bullets for self defense or hunting, then use the primer specified in the loading data tables.

With some powders I find little to no velocity change, but with certain other powders (specifically Titegroup) the Magnum primers make a big difference.
Since the Magnum primers are really the same price (or close) I would generally use what the tables say they tested the load with.

Chief38
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357 magnum, primer, remington, sig arms, winchester

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