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Old 10-07-2018, 09:43 AM
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Default Update! Ādvice requested

The encrusted die arrived and looked like a rust ball, nothing moved. I was afraid that the die was a total loss. I am happy to report that the current formula of Coke works as well as the original formula from the '60s. A 3 hour soak in about 2" of CocaCola dissolved all of the rust and the die could be completely disassembled without any tools. After an overnight soak it will be rinsed with water, dried, then lightly oiled.

I have a soft spot for the old Lyman 310 Tong Tool, ever since I saw one of their old "loading in a nutshell" ads. I find them to be useful when doing range testing (provided that I have the proper dies), when at matches when I have to reload some extra ammo, or for the infamous SHTF scenario. I have put together a complete set of 38/357 for my children so they will be able to keep the revolvers they will inherit running.

I needed to locate a flat tipped seating stem for my wadcutters and SWC bullets. These stems are not easy to find, but I did obtain one that is encrusted in rust. Back when my grandfather was alive, when we needed to break thru rusted nuts, bolts, and parts on the farm, we would just soak the items in CocaCola. If that doesn't work with the new formulas of Coke, what would the forum suggest that I try?

Thanks in advance for your advice!
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Last edited by lrrifleman; Yesterday at 03:07 PM. Reason: Updated information
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Old 10-07-2018, 10:53 AM
WR Moore WR Moore is offline
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Lyman still makes & sells the tong tools, dies and parts. You might check with them about new parts. The one issue with the tong tool is that it really doesn't full length resize the brass. Long term, making sure your kids have presses and dies would be a good thing.

BTW, I seated bunches of wadcutters & SWCs with whatever (RN) seating stem came with my 310 dies.

Dunno about Coke, but there are commercial rust removal/neutralizing chemicals. Naval Jelly is one consumer grade product. A non consumer grade product is Meuratic (sp) Acid.

Last edited by WR Moore; 10-07-2018 at 11:05 AM.
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Old 10-07-2018, 10:56 AM
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naval jelly or a good soak in a mix of ATF and acetone in a sealed container should work
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Old 10-07-2018, 11:48 AM
mikronis98 mikronis98 is offline
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Have you looked at the LEE Handloader? I've loaded many thousands from 5.56 Nato, 9mm up to .45-70 Gov. and including around 3,000 7.62 NATO military range brass that was difficult to run through the de-capping dies.
KROIL will be your friend dealing with the rust issue.
Good luck

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Old 10-07-2018, 12:02 PM
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Naval jelly for rust removal.
The old tong tools are great nostalgia but shtf scenario, I just dont see it. You arent carry around primer & powder. If you are scavanging components from other ammo, then bullet puller & other tools are needed, so a cheap ss press will do just fine for your base camp. On the move, I am scrounging ammo, not trying to make it. Why my shtf gun is a g32 w/ 9 & 40 bbs.
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Old 10-07-2018, 12:07 PM
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Back when I started reloading, Lee presses had a poor reputation, and that bias has stuck with me.

Currently, I have 4 310 tools: 2 small handled with near complete sets of 38/357 dies, and 2 large handled with a complete set of 30-06, 270, and 2 sets of 222 adjusted for 223.
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Old Yesterday, 03:12 PM
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Bump up. Please see update in post #1.
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Old Yesterday, 03:45 PM
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What makes Coke dissolve rust is Phosphoric acid.
It was an old emergency get the stuck lug nut of to change a tire trick.



There are far better "formulas" of this than sticky cola.
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Old Yesterday, 05:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rule3 View Post
What makes Coke dissolve rust is Phosphoric acid.
It was an old emergency get the stuck lug nut of to change a tire trick.



There are far better "formulas" of this than sticky cola.
Note - I'm not an expert of metals or their treatment and I could be full of it.

I believe the common brand name of phosphoric acid found at marine stores is Ospho. Phosphoric acid is usually sold as a "rust converter" in that is converts the rust to a type of primer. I don't know that it would be ideal for the purpose.

Mixing up a batch of citric acid should work. It will eat the rust but isn't so strong that it will rapidly attack the metal. I've never tested it's effects on carbide???
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Old Yesterday, 05:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrrifleman View Post
Back when I started reloading, Lee presses had a poor reputation, and that bias has stuck with me.
I tend to agree with you but the hand loader previously pictured works well. I've had one for years. I don't use it extensively but it does work very well for working up loads at the range, especially if you bring resized and primed brass.
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Old Yesterday, 06:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oink View Post
Note - I'm not an expert of metals or their treatment and I could be full of it.

I believe the common brand name of phosphoric acid found at marine stores is Ospho. Phosphoric acid is usually sold as a "rust converter" in that is converts the rust to a type of primer. I don't know that it would be ideal for the purpose.

Mixing up a batch of citric acid should work. It will eat the rust but isn't so strong that it will rapidly attack the metal. I've never tested it's effects on carbide???



I guess everything is a debate,


Let your fingers do the typing through the internet.


Just one of MANY



Remove Rust from Metal with Naval Jelly(R) Rust Treatment from Loctite Adhesives


http://hybris.cms.henkel.com/henkel/...US&language=EN


Use whatever you want.



Does Coca Cola really remove rust? - Team Boom
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Old Yesterday, 10:48 PM
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Should have added a shot of bourbon to the Coke.
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Old Today, 09:20 AM
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Naval Jelly, at least the stuff labeled and sold by Locktite is phosphoric acic primarily with a tiny bit of sulphuric acid in at as well (1% or less).
Probably some other proprietary chemicals as well.

I used it quite a lot in removing bluing from guns, Bluing is a form of rust/iron oxide no matter the method it is applied.
It quickly wipes hot salt bluing from the surfaces. It takes a 5 or 10 minutes and some agitation to get thru most rust blue.
I use a very weak soln of muriatic acid now to do the same. Cheaper and easier to handle.
That will remove heavy rust, heat scale, ect as well if you can soak the part(s) in it for a while.
I use a couple tbs /per gallon water.
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