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  #51  
Old 03-30-2018, 12:05 AM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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Originally Posted by raljr1 View Post
If Mrs ever leaves me, I'm looking this lady up. Damned impressed!
Chuckling and thinking, “gun nuts are easy!”
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  #52  
Old 03-30-2018, 10:41 AM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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Next steps? a) Someone offered to send me schematic so I’ll try to find that post. Sure could use that now. b) Now that they are out, can someone (hi, mike?) tell me how to clean ivory stocks? c) I think now I can handle removing the cylinder so will look for that post. d) This gun spent the better part of 40 years sitting in hot attic. I want to stop rust, clean/treat as best I can. e) I was/am hoping to get gun minimally function, i.e. pulling back hammer cocks the gun.(a girl can hope) f) Review/Write everyone on this listserve for product tips to best bring this girl back to full health. g) Not replace main spring or hammer. She needs to be heavily original. h) If I’m able to sufficiently clean, put her back together, find a nice display case for gun and letter and find suitable place to keep in my home.
probably forgetting important steps. What would they be? I can take/sendvto gunsmith but nervous to lose possession. Thoughts??
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Old 03-30-2018, 12:12 PM
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Pam, It was me that offered to send you a schematic, etc. PM me with your USPS Mail address, and it's on the way. Ed.
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Old 03-30-2018, 08:55 PM
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HI, b) here. You don't want to disturb the patina that has formed on the ivory through years of use. That quickly destroys the collector value and interest. At the most, I'd wipe them with a little alcohol on a soft rag AFTER any repair(s). When (if) you get the broken piece, then I'd clean the adjoining broken edges with alcohol and glue them together with Stupid Glue (Cyanoacrylate). I would not clean the grip surface until the broken pieces were bonded as any spill of Stupid Glue will bond instantly to the surface and make removal that much more difficult when clean. IF a spill happens, then it will need to be removed (a razor blade comes to mind). The resultant scrape (if irritatingly noticeable) can be minimized with brewed Tea.

After all repairs, I'd wipe the surface with denatured, store bought, alcohol and lightly apply Baby oil to the outside surface; leaving the inside uncoated.

In the FWIW category, ivory in museums often have a small vial of water in the case with the ivory. They usually do not put baby oil on their ivory sculptures but they do put water in the case to raise the humidity to keep their prizes from cracking.
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Old 03-30-2018, 09:19 PM
new2S&W new2S&W is offline
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Pam,
You might be interested in picking up a copy of David Chicoine's book "Antique Firearms Assembly/Disassembly..." available from Amazon for a little over $30.
Many of his other books also diagram components of models including model 3 Americans.

Gary
US American serial number 1030 owner.
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Old 03-30-2018, 10:02 PM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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Thank you both. I just ordered a book by Charles Pate. I think the title was Model 3 American Model? I will also obtain your recommended book, Gary, because;

I also have received: a Winchester rifle Model 189x? My serial number = year 1913; a darling little 5 shot number w pearl grips - I believe a 44; and, 2 British bulldog copies. So, shame on me for starting/learning on the Model 3, Queen of the Castle.

Re the ivory, I’m only thinking of cleaning back side (ahem). I’ll follow your cautious approach.

Has anyone ever used (on ivory:”): “Renaissance Groom/Stick Archival Natural Rubber Knead Cleaner Molecular Trap 100 Grams”. Reviews? Too obscure?

Happy Easter,
Pam
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Old 03-30-2018, 10:14 PM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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Looks perfect for me. Thanks for the tip!

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Originally Posted by new2S&W View Post
Pam,
You might be interested in picking up a copy of David Chicoine's book "Antique Firearms Assembly/Disassembly..." available from Amazon for a little over $30.
Many of his other books also diagram components of models including model 3 Americans.

Gary
US American serial number 1030 owner.
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  #58  
Old 03-30-2018, 10:21 PM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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Dear b),

Oh... clean After repairs.... scuffling off.... (Thanks for vial of water in display case. Was wondering how to keep humidity up.)

QUOTE=mmaher94087;139984085]HI, b) here. You don't want to disturb the patina that has formed on the ivory through years of use. That quickly destroys the collector value and interest. At the most, I'd wipe them with a little alcohol on a soft rag AFTER any repair(s). When (if) you get the broken piece, then I'd clean the adjoining broken edges with alcohol and glue them together with Stupid Glue (Cyanoacrylate). I would not clean the grip surface until the broken pieces were bonded as any spill of Stupid Glue will bond instantly to the surface and make removal that much more difficult when clean. IF a spill happens, then it will need to be removed (a razor blade comes to mind). The resultant scrape (if irritatingly noticeable) can be minimized with brewed Tea.

After .[/QUOTE]
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Old 03-30-2018, 11:02 PM
mmaher94087 mmaher94087 is offline
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The rub is that water in the case (or shadow box) is detrimental to the metal of the revolver. I believe the natural humidity of Nor Cal will keep the ivories humidified without any additional help. A light coat of oil or Renaissance Wax on the revolver will keep it preserved while the ivory will be happy with the ambient humidity in the house. This is from an ex-mid-peninsula transplant.
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Old 04-01-2018, 07:26 PM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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Yoo-hoo! Gentlemanly gun guy Guy!

I guess my next step is to remove cylinder, if it cooperates. Referencing the “cylinder catch screw,” is the screw on side of gun (pic #1) or on top (pic 2)? Thanks! Pam


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Pam,
Thanks
I recommend removing the cylinder from the center pin before cleaning. That way you can work on the bore from the rear of the barrel and not accidentally damage the muzzle. There is a cylinder catch screw on the top strap just in front of the barrel catch. That should be loosened to lift the cylinder catch up so the cylinder can be unscrewed and pulled backward off the center pin. You can see the cylinder catch which is an L shaped plate under the latch that is screwed down until its lip drops behind the cylinder and forms a stop to prevent if from being pulled off the center pin. As you loosen the screw, the catch will lift up and allow the cylinder to move rearward. Just grasp the cylinder and pull it rearward then unscrew it from the center pin...turn left to loosen, right to tighten it when you put it back.

Blue Wonde.
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Old 04-01-2018, 09:56 PM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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Hello Mike,

Do you agree to 40-50% RH as good environment to keep this gun? Thanks. Pam

p.s. Your “Fit, Form, and Function” theory relative to gender is just full of fascination, ain’t it?
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Old 04-01-2018, 10:40 PM
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Thank you for sharing with us ! I’ve enjoyed following along. A very inspiring post !
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Old 04-01-2018, 11:31 PM
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Pam, I feel that your 40-50% humidity would be fine. My folks had ivory things around the house and I didn't see any deterioration in the pieces. It's the fluctuation between the humidity points that is the bummer for Ivory as it swells and contracts with moisture. I.e. causes cracking.
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Old 04-01-2018, 11:40 PM
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I forgot to answer your question on 'removing the cylinder". Picture two; that is the D@rn screw that holds the cylinder in place. As you might tell; it's usually rusted in place and can be a challenge to remove. Patience and penetrating oil. More patience. More oil.
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Old 04-02-2018, 12:05 AM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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Thanks, Mastodonian Mike! Mid-peninsula? Well done by dad the geologist!

If I can tax your patience further, now I’m worried (it never stops) about what looks like some sort of rust/chem reaction/biological agent I see between the ivory and the ... ... dang it! What’s the word for the metal piece that is recessed into the ivory and holds the piece of ivory in place. I want to say escargot! Anyway, I can see some sort of green ring. Pictures (attached) were a challenge. Be kind.
Thank you!
Pam
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Old 04-02-2018, 01:30 AM
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Hi Pam, the screw I'm referring to it's the one in your second picture on top of the top strap in front of the the rear sights. That screw needs to be loosened to allow the cylinder catch to free the cylinder as you unscrew it.

Guy
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Old 04-02-2018, 01:34 AM
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Got it! Thanks, Guy!
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Old 04-02-2018, 01:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Norcal_lover View Post
Thanks, Mastodonian Mike! Mid-peninsula? Well done by dad the geologist!

If I can tax your patience further, now I’m worried (it never stops) about what looks like some sort of rust/chem reaction/biological agent I see between the ivory and the ... ... dang it! What’s the word for the metal piece that is recessed into the ivory and holds the piece of ivory in place. I want to say escargot! Anyway, I can see some sort of green ring. Pictures (attached) were a challenge. Be kind.
Thank you!
Pam
That is the grip escutcheon and it is made of brass. The green brass tarnish is known as verdigris. I wouldn't be concerned about it myself. There appears to be very little of it and it lends character on a piece this old.
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Old 04-02-2018, 11:20 AM
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Thank you, BC38. I do like the look.
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Old 04-03-2018, 12:38 AM
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I have followed this whole thread in wonder. Kudos to you, Pam, for jumping in to take this on.
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Old 04-03-2018, 07:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Norcal_lover View Post
I think I’ve double-posted, so this would make a triple-post but still trying to send dang photos. Thank you for your patience. Sigh.

Pam
Hi, Pam. well ... yaaaaaah, I'd say a proper burial is in order for those stocks. I suggest you seek another decent set of stocks, wood is just fine.

Buying another set of Ivory stocks or having a set made (if that is even legal any more) would be cost prohibitive, I feel.

If you decide to preserve this one, first get the mechanical issued corrected properly, then I'd go as far as to shoot the bundle it would cost to find a nice set of vintage Ivories for it.

If, when gun is closed, you do not have any looseness or slop at the clasp and / or hinge areas then spend a few bucks on it. However, if it is worn to the point of feeling loose or sloppy when closed, I would reconsider seriously how much, if anything, I'd spend on it.
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Old 04-03-2018, 01:51 PM
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Hi Pam,

I to have enjoyed following along on your journey.

I have to point out that alcohol does make a good cleaner BUT I think it will dry the stocks out even further. I wouldn't advise using it.
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Old 04-03-2018, 02:24 PM
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I would cherish any gun received from a relative. My grandfathers guns went to another cousin.
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Old 04-03-2018, 09:02 PM
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I'll agree with Dartshark; but only to a point. Alcohol WILL dry out the ivory and should be used judiciously. Do not soak the panels as a light wipe down is all that is needed. An Alcohol wipe will, however, remove any skin oils, or, as often found with firearms, the stocks/grips are sometimes wiped down with a patch that has gun oil. Both oils are detrimental to repairing stocks as they will keep the halves from bonding with the adhesive. If the stocks are saturated from oil then a repair is almost impossible.
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Old 04-03-2018, 09:51 PM
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Thanks, B-Bill for your comments. Yes, I feel this gun is imbued with history: both familial and cultural. We too thought grandpa’s collection was long gone to my cousins; additionally, we were told they sold them. 40 years later some if his guns were “discovered” in an attic.

Yes, I cherish everything about this gun.

Regards,
Pam

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I would cherish any gun received from a relative. My grandfathers guns went to another cousin.
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Old 04-03-2018, 10:14 PM
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Hi Sal,

Thanks for your thoughts. This gun is what a relative called “tight.” No wobble, no loose joints, no creaking when she gets up in the morning....

The reason I initially worked on the gun was to learn as much as I could about the gun and its history. I also felt it would renew a bond I had with my late grandfather (it did). I already feel an ownership I didn’t feel previous to cleaning the gun and talking to you folks/collectors. I didn’t work on the gun myself to avoid spending money on the gun. I’ll drop shiny coins when i know what’s wrong w trigger, etc. and when I’m ready to have it professionally cleaned.

I will keep the original ivory stocks for above reasons.

I look forward to your additional comments, Sal. It’s really impressive how many of you spend a great deal of time and effort helping the newbies out. Thanks!

Pam


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Hi, Pam. well ... yaaaaaah, I'd say a proper burial is in order for those stocks. I suggest you seek another decent set of stocks, wood is just fine.

Buying another set of Ivory stocks or having a set made (if that is even legal any more) would be cost prohibitive, I feel.

If you decide to preserve this one, first get the mechanical issued corrected properly, then I'd go as far as to shoot the bundle it would cost to find a nice set of vintage Ivories for it.

If, when gun is closed, you do not have any looseness or slop at the clasp and / or hinge areas then spend a few bucks on it. However, if it is worn to the point of feeling loose or sloppy when closed, I reconsider seriously how much, if anything, I'd spend on it.
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Old 04-03-2018, 11:05 PM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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Hi Dartshart and Mike,

Thanks, guys. Got it.
When I look at the remains of glue used to hold 2 pieces of ivory together, it presents like rubber cement. So, seems like a tiny bit of alcohol will help cut through the ‘rubber’ bits. As to cleaning the surface of the stocks, how do you gentlemen feel about milk? Or better put, if I try milk but ivory surface still is dirty, can I still use infinitesimally amount of alcohol to clean surface of stocks?
Thanks for your thoughts,
Pam
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Old 04-04-2018, 06:17 AM
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Been keeping up with this thread it has been very informative and a little nerve abrasive I must admit impressive is a good word for the whole performance .
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Old 04-04-2018, 09:05 AM
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The glue can also be hide glue, an old-time popular adhesive that was cheap and easy to use. Problem is that with both latex (rubber) or hide glue it that they are very weak. I do not think you need to worry about glue on the stock unless you find the other half. There are a few conservators out there that can replace the missing piece and if you want to keep them on the gun, I would seek out their advice. They will properly clean, repair, and give you a professional job. There is certainly a cost to this work, but it will be well worth the effort. I am the first to say I would be an amateur at repairing and conserving ivory and would definitely contact experts in the field.

Everyone has their own ideas on how to do stuff, unfortunately, some I have seen in this thread should not be attempted by amateurs. Here is some information I located that might help you out.

Cleaning
If the ivory object is in good stable condition, cleaning the surface of dirt and grime with a mild soap and water solution is appropriate. If the dusting is not enough the ivory can be cleaned with a mixture of water and mild soap (such as Ivory Snow or WA Paste). Never soak ivory as the water could cause the dirt to become more visible by embedding it into cracks or pores. Many liquids can be destructive to ivory so avoid if possible or contact a professional.

Stabilization and structural treatments
Avoid over the counter adhesives when repairing cracks or breaks of ivory. These repairs are difficult and the use of poor adhesives can result in staining of the ivory and embrittlement as the adhesives age. Breaks and cracks can be important historically and show its use of the object. Unnecessary repairs can result in the loss of that historical information. Contact a conservator before any structural repairs are made.

Surface treatments
Avoid wax or other protective coatings as they can age over time resulting in yellowing or darkening of the ivory surface. It can also obscure surface details that may be important to the object. The protective coatings can become difficult or even impossible to remove without damage to the object. If possible to remove unstable surface treatments, do so with appropriate solvents. Use caution and have a professional consulted before doing any work on the ivory.

Intervention
Especially in archaeological contexts, interventive treatment may in some cases be considered necessary. Such intervention is governed by conservation ethics, in particular the principles of reversibility and minimum intervention. Possible treatments include the reduction of salts to prevent further deterioration, and the consolidation of delaminating and friable components. Any treatment should be undertaken by a conservation professional.

Contact a professional
Ivory is extremely sensitive and reactive, if it is broken or extremely dirty please contact a professional conservator to conduct the repairs and extensive cleaning.


If you are going to pass this revolver down to future generations, repair and stabilization of those stocks is very important. One of the largest ivory restoration firms in the US is below and maybe a good place to call.

Ivory Repair, Ivory Restoration, fineart-restoration.com
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Old 04-04-2018, 09:06 AM
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Pam,
I think a jeweler should be able to clean and repair the stocks if you feel uncomfortable doing it.
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Old 04-04-2018, 11:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Norcal_lover View Post
Hi Sal,

Thanks for your thoughts. This gun is what a relative called “tight.” No wobble, no loose joints, no creaking when she gets up in the morning....

The reason I initially worked on the gun was to learn as much as I could about the gun and its history. I also felt it would renew a bond I had with my late grandfather (it did). I already feel an ownership I didn’t feel previous to cleaning the gun and talking to you folks/collectors. I didn’t work on the gun myself to avoid spending money on the gun. I’ll drop shiny coins when i know what’s wrong w trigger, etc. and when I’m ready to have it professionally cleaned.

I will keep the original ivory stocks for above reasons.

I look forward to your additional comments, Sal. It’s really impressive how many of you spend a great deal of time and effort helping the newbies out. Thanks!

Pam
Pam, Us old older guys have little else to do. We can be very helpful and courteous. However, at times, we can be brutally honest.

Weigh advice from the sources that offer it. You choose the proper method that suits you. The majority of the advice is spot on.

You have found the correct haunt of us chivalrous (well most of us) old (many of us) S&W collectors and preservationists. Many of us rescue old and "sick" S&Ws like others might rescue old or abused animals. And, most likely, we rescue animals, too. (I'm a sucker for a stray canine that need a meal, is sick or has a sad face ).

After most of my life in automotive restorative repairs and full body and mechanical restorations, I have had the sad duty of informing people who were sentimentally attached to an old car, that they are likely going to spend more money in restoration than the car is worth and would likely not be a wise investment. This statement was brutally honest, yes, but necessary. The owners could then make a wiser choice yet most times, against advice, they proceeded with the repairs and / or restoration.

My technique was to put up a full and fair evaluation, up front. Best case to worst case scenarios.

However, sentiment "is" love. It's a all or nothing proposition, most times not making any common sense what so ever. But, we fragile humans grasp sentiment tightly, as we should. Sentiment and love are places we feel safe and secure.

About 25 years ago, I had a in-depth discussion with Norm Flayderman, the sole antique guru of the time for many decades prior and until his death several years back. In his original and unique publications on antique firearms identification and value (where there were no other publications that came anywhere near the quality of his) he wrote that mechanical condition and bore (the inside of the barrel not a person) have no variance on the value of an antique firearm.

I contested this with him in conversations at social functions. Being a master mechanic almost my entire adult life, my premier concern would be mechanical function. To me, what good is it if it doesn't function properly ?

Words from a guy who does ground-up restorations ... everything not only has to look as it did when new ... it has to function as it did when new.

I also coined a short phrase that "new is only new once". After that there can be, "like" new (to a very rigid set of standards) but THAT is it. It will never again be "new".

In summation, I suggest you focus on the mechanical issues first. After that's taken care of, decide where to go from there, reevaluating how much you have invested at that time.

PS: we are not so old that we do not recognize the double entendres and innuendos but we're just loving it. Welcome to the group.
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Old 04-04-2018, 08:24 PM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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[Pam will need to join us at a later date. She is currently sitting in the corner of the room breathing into a paper bag... ... muttering about GTO’s, Dawn dishwashing liquid, and moonshine... ....]
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  #83  
Old 04-04-2018, 08:35 PM
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Maybe Keith Brown could whip up a set of Roper's for that gun. I have a buddy that makes knives and he acquired a set of Mastodon ivory scales to make a knife handle out of while visiting Alaska. Since they are all dead, I don't think that ivory is illegal however quite expensive. Would make very cool stocks though.
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Old 04-05-2018, 12:20 AM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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Sir Sal,
Thank you for taking the time to explain your perspective - and so eloquently. I am quite sure everyone is recommending actions/ repairs, etc. based on their own unique successful experience. I appreciate every comment, especially the plain spoken ones.

James the III and others,
Thanks for the suggestion/referral. I’m still holding out hope that the Wells Fargo wagon will eventually bring the original missing piece of ivory. Fingers still crossed.
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Old 04-05-2018, 01:23 AM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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Master Gary,
So Much Great Information! I especially like the tidbit about “hide glue.” I guess if I am to restore, I’d better get to boiling cow skin.
I have visited the ivory restoration/repair site, and their before/after pictures are remarkable.
I need to re-read your post several times before I can pretend to ask an informed question.
Pam

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Originally Posted by glowe View Post
The glue can also be hide glue, an old-time popular adhesive that was cheap and easy to use. Problem is that with both latex (rubber) or hide glue it that they are very weak. I do not think you need to worry about glue on the stock unless you find the other half. There are a few conservators out there that can replace the missing piece and if you want to keep them on the gun, I would seek out their advice. They will properly clean, repair, and give you a professional job. There is certainly a cost to this work, but it will be well worth the effort. I am the first to say I would be an amateur at repairing and conserving ivory and would definitely contact experts in the field.

Everyone has their own ideas on how to do stuff, unfortunately, some I have seen in this thread should not be attempted by amateurs. Here is some information I located that might help you out.

Cleaning
If the ivory object is in good stable condition, cleaning the surface of dirt and grime with a mild soap and water solution is appropriate. If the dusting is not enough the ivory can be cleaned with a mixture of water and mild soap (such as Ivory Snow or WA Paste). Never soak ivory as the water could cause the dirt to become more visible by embedding it into cracks or pores. Many liquids can be destructive to ivory so avoid if possible or contact a professional.

Stabilization and structural treatments
Avoid over the counter adhesives when repairing cracks or breaks of ivory. These repairs are difficult and the use of poor adhesives can result in staining of the ivory and embrittlement as the adhesives age. Breaks and cracks can be important historically and show its use of the object. Unnecessary repairs can result in the loss of that historical information. Contact a conservator before any structural repairs are made.

Surface treatments
Avoid wax or other protective coatings as they can age over time resulting in yellowing or darkening of the ivory surface. It can also obscure surface details that may be important to the object. The protective coatings can become difficult or even impossible to remove without damage to the object. If possible to remove unstable surface treatments, do so with appropriate solvents. Use caution and have a professional consulted before doing any work on the ivory.

Intervention
Especially in archaeological contexts, interventive treatment may in some cases be considered necessary. Such intervention is governed by conservation ethics, in particular the principles of reversibility and minimum intervention. Possible treatments include the reduction of salts to prevent further deterioration, and the consolidation of delaminating and friable components. Any treatment should be undertaken by a conservation professional.

Contact a professional
Ivory is extremely sensitive and reactive, if it is broken or extremely dirty please contact a professional conservator to conduct the repairs and extensive cleaning.


If you are going to pass this revolver down to future generations, repair and stabilization of those stocks is very important. One of the largest ivory restoration firms in the US is below and maybe a good place to call.

Ivory Repair, Ivory Restoration, fineart-restoration.com
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  #86  
Old 04-05-2018, 01:24 AM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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I hear you Gentleman Guy.
Pam

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Pam,
I think a jeweler should be able to clean and repair the stocks if you feel uncomfortable doing it.
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Old 04-05-2018, 11:25 AM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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Hi Ed,
Thanks for sending the schematics; I’ve already used the info. I’ve discovered subtle differences between how various sources present the same info via schematics. I see that multiple resources are needed and appreciate you helping. Could you tell me title of book from which you pulled the information?

Thanks again!
Pam


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Originally Posted by opoefc View Post
Pam, It was me that offered to send you a schematic, etc. PM me with your USPS Mail address, and it's on the way. Ed.
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Old 04-10-2018, 07:48 PM
opoefc opoefc is offline
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Pam, Not having kept copies of what I sent you, I'm going to shoot in the dark here. I know part of it was from the Gun Digest Book of Exploded Firearms Drawings, 3rd edit. by Haroldl A. Murtz, p. 363. Also, I believe I sent you info from "Antique Firearms Assembly / Disassembly" by David R. Chicoine and perhaps from another book by same author, " Smith & Wesson Sixguns of the Old West" Different authors used different terminology for the same parts, which can confuse newcomers, so I hope all this helped. Ed.

Last edited by opoefc; 04-10-2018 at 07:50 PM.
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Old 04-10-2018, 11:59 PM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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Hi Ed! Oh thanks for info. And I have since learned that there are multiple sources for this sort of thing. I was just looking for my “trigger spring” (because every girl needs one).

Oh! I received the missing piece of ivory! Yup, I’ll attach pics. When I overcome my procrastination, I’ll probably start calling for estimates. Will probably start w Gary’s shared link.

Warm regards,
Pam
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Old 04-11-2018, 09:14 AM
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I have scanned an old article by Roy Double from the 1970s which was the first comprehensive work on Model 3s (all of them) with some very nice parts diagrams.

Download link closed. Any S&WCA member who may still want a copy, please EMAIL me. Sal
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Last edited by model3sw; 04-16-2018 at 03:48 PM. Reason: close download link
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Old 04-11-2018, 11:47 PM
Norcal_lover Norcal_lover is offline
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Thanks, Sal the Senior! Mr. Double’s effort contained rich information. Great stuff - though how y’all distinguish one variant, model, issue from another is still baffling! And that serial numbers were used in such a casual fashion turns my Virgo brain into perma-tilt.

A few pics are attached to show my progress. I think I shall continue to clean for a bit and then stop and look for someone to turn the gun over to for addl cleaning and TLC, and, as part of the cleaning process, engage in a conversation about what is causing the hammer not to cock and what it would take to fix. Thanks for listening!

Pam
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Old 04-27-2018, 03:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Norcal_lover View Post
Thanks, Sal the Senior! Mr. Double’s effort contained rich information. Great stuff - though how y’all distinguish one variant, model, issue from another is still baffling! And that serial numbers were used in such a casual fashion turns my Virgo brain into perma-tilt.

A few pics are attached to show my progress. I think I shall continue to clean for a bit and then stop and look for someone to turn the gun over to for addl cleaning and TLC, and, as part of the cleaning process, engage in a conversation about what is causing the hammer not to cock and what it would take to fix. Thanks for listening!

Pam
Pam, what chemical or product did you use on "Pawpaw's" old Russian that cleaned the dull rusted areas and left the Nickel unscathed ?

You believe at my age I never attempted anything like that ?

Brava, to you, for your courage and determination ! You girls have it all over us guys with the cosmetic process. Well, most "guy" type guys ... that is. (That's "guy" with U in between).
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Last edited by model3sw; 04-28-2018 at 11:24 AM. Reason: amended
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