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S&W Hand Ejectors: 1896 to 1961 All 5-Screw & Vintage 4-Screw SWING-OUT Cylinder REVOLVERS, and the 35 Autos and 32 Autos


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Old 03-04-2015, 06:47 PM
DixieDarlin DixieDarlin is offline
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Default Looking to identify this hand ejector please.

This is a gun my Mother has that was my Grandfathers. We do not know what this gun is other than CTG .38.

Info:
YOKE: No model number or Reg number.

Type: Hand Ejector
Serial #: 201XX from butt of gun handle
CTG: .38 S&W Special "U. S. Service CTG's"
Barrel Length: 4 1/8 Unless I measured wrong
Sights: Fixed
Screws: 4 screws but none on the front of the trigger guard.

I will try to link the photos I have here. Notice on one photo it looks silver/chrome on only half of the gun. That is just the way the photo came out. The gun is dark all over. Thanks.









If that doesn't work here's the bucket. http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w...psk6goyceg.jpg

Thank you.
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Old 03-04-2015, 06:51 PM
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Welcome to the Forum.
You have a Military and Police 1st Model. It was made in 1902.
I would caution you to have it checked out by a gunsmith before you shoot it, and then only with standard velocity ammunition.
Jim
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Old 03-04-2015, 06:58 PM
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Thank you very much. My Grandfather kept it in his shed and it was only wrapped in a cloth. Thank you again for such a quick response, Jim. We have some others but I have to take photos and find the right forum. Some really weird looking guns. More like musket pistols. LOL that's all I can think they are. Just weird looking. Thanks again!
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Old 03-04-2015, 07:09 PM
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It is a .38 Hand Ejector, Model of 1902 Military Revolver. It likely shipped sometime in the first half of 1902. It is also sometimes called the Second Model.
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Old 03-04-2015, 07:13 PM
DixieDarlin DixieDarlin is offline
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Thank you Dwalt. I don't expect it has any value to it other than it was my Grandfather's. Could you tell me...is it suppose to be that color? It's not rust I don't think. I oiled and cleaned it up as best I can. Thanks.
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Old 03-04-2015, 07:33 PM
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It does have value. Maybe not a lot, but my bet would be $2-$300. It's hard to tell from the pictures exactly what the condition is.
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Old 03-04-2015, 07:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DixieDarlin View Post
Thank you Dwalt. I don't expect it has any value to it other than it was my Grandfather's. Could you tell me...is it suppose to be that color? It's not rust I don't think. I oiled and cleaned it up as best I can. Thanks.
In old S&Ws, condition is the most important consideration in value. If the exterior is exposed to the elements, and the surface is not kept oiled or waxed, the finish deteriorates rather rapidly, and will eventually take on a brown patina, which is actually rust. Yours is headed that way. Not much you can do about it now, except to keep it from getting worse. The grips may be of a plastic called Catalin, and there are those who value Catalin stocks in undamaged condition. Regarding monetary value, and assuming that there are no mechanical problems and the bore is not rusted out, I'd think you wouldn't have much trouble in getting about $350 for it, maybe even a little more. You can shoot it if you wish, but use only standard velocity lead bullet loads. By the way, the "U. S. Service Cartridge" is the .38 Long Colt, which was the standard U. S. military revolver cartridge from about 1890-1911. It is a little shorter than the later .38 S&W Special cartridge, but otherwise dimensionally the same.
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Old 03-04-2015, 07:45 PM
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Thanks Jmace57 and Dwalt. I truly appreciate the information. Guess it's good I oiled it down and cleaned it. Darn but no wonder it's that color since it was only wrapped in a cloth. Guess my Grandfather had it out there "for in case of" situations. I'll be taking it up and having it checked out. Little heavy to me, but my Mom said that I could have it. So will be nice to have and maybe shoot out back sometimes. Thank you all again for the information. Have a good evening.

Last edited by DixieDarlin; 03-04-2015 at 07:47 PM. Reason: Correction
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Old 03-04-2015, 08:14 PM
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Dixie,

Welcome to the Forum and congratulations on getting a nice old link to your grandfather. The family value of old heirlooms like this often exceeds their monetary value.

Regarding the other "really weird looking guns" I would suggest this: Even though this is a Smith & Wesson Forum, many of the members have much broader knowledge of other old firearms so if you will post pictures and descriptions in Firearms & Knives - Other Brands section here, we will attempt to assist you in the identifications.

Bob

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Old 03-04-2015, 09:05 PM
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DixieDarlin,

You have a wonderful family heirloom and it's monetary value is irrelevant in my opinion. The value is in handing it down thru future generations with some notes of everything you know about it.

You mentioned it doesn't have 5 screws. That's because it's such an early model, that the design for the screw in front of the trigger guard had not been incorporated into that model yet. So it's still a four screw design.

It is a quality made, turn of the century revolver very well engineered, assembled with skilled craftsmanship’ and hand fitting no longer affordable on a competitive market basis, and that we'll never see again, ever.

Shoot it to your hearts delight, and it will delight you with its fine accuracy, and comfortable recoil.

Simply put, the only usual issue with these marvels of yesteryear is they are gummed up and dirty. Old oils of its time do not match the science of today or the quality of these old guns, and actually dry up and harden to the point of impeding operation and accelerating wear. The simple solution does not need a gunsmith. Just one of a few premium modern gun products from any sporting goods, gun store or hardware store.

Most are both cleaning and preserving agents; Breakfree, Kroil & M-pro7 are some of the best, but there are others. Disassembly is not necessary. With a spray can version of the product, flood and flush the revolver thru every opening and crevice until the black gunk stops flowing out, let it drain for an hour and wipe it down good.

Definitely with grips off: Loosen the grip screw completely and carefully push down on the screw head until the bottom grip separates, then remove. Now push the top side grip off with a finger or toothbrush from the backside thru the grip frame. Scrub barrel bore and cylinder chambers with a simple cleaning rod kit found at the same places as the cleaning agents above, and patches cut from rags is all you really need. And scrub any observed exterior and crevice crud with an old toothbrush with bristles cut off short for stiffness.

For rust spots, use Bronze wool, not steel wool, size 0000 and toothbrush with bristles cut short, and a rust removing agent/gun cleaner like M-Pro 7 (odor free), Kroil or Breakfree and gentle scrubbing.

Rust pitting must have all red color removed to arrest it's cancerous growth (use 5x glasses or stronger to see progress). Then re-oil or wax over.

Once cleaned and lubricated, with a few simple checks you can determine if it’s safe to use. Cock the hammer slowly and confirm the cylinder is locked in position for each of the 6 chambers. If satisfactory, now operate the gun by pulling the trigger slowly until the hammer drops. Again, confirm each time after cycling the action, that the cyl is still locked in position. Cock the hammer in single action mode. Gently push on the hammer to confirm that it will not drop w/o pulling the trigger.

Here' another section of this forum for posting photos of the other guns that members can advise you on:
Firearms & Knives - Other Brands

Enjoy your heirloom!
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Old 03-04-2015, 09:17 PM
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"...but no wonder it's that color since it was only wrapped in a cloth"

I remember seeing one gun which had been wrapped in a cloth during many years of storage, and there was a perfect image of the weave of the cloth rusted into the metal. Spray auto carb cleaner is also a good way to blast out the crud and corruption of years of dried oil and dirt in the works.
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Old 03-04-2015, 10:10 PM
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Thanks Bob, I'll certainly do that. I need to get them out and get photos. Might take a little bit, but we'd like to know what those "weird guns" could be. I know my Mom doesn't know and I've just never seen any like that. Of course, that's not saying much...I haven't owned or been around many guns. I remember my Dad having a gold trigger rifle that he's use to let me shoot at the dirt pit years ago. I had fun even though it would knock your shoulder off.
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Old 03-04-2015, 10:40 PM
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I bet it was a shotgun, and a Browning shotgun since they had gold triggers. That would be valuable if you could track that one down.
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Old 03-04-2015, 10:41 PM
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Jim...what can I say. That is awesome information/instructions! I would like to add, my Grandfather must have been cleaning this gun as it's clean. I mean when I cleaned the gun, it barely had anything come off of it. I'll have to check inside about gunk...but it looked clean. Then too, I may not know what I'm looking for. :P

Thank you kindly for explaining the "how to" I will certainly use this as a guide to really clean all the guns. I'll be sure to follow up with some after photos on my cleaning job.




DWalt, while I have not been a gun enthusiast, I do wish this gun would have been taken better care of since it is so old. Hopefully I can spiff it up a little bit with instructions. For all I know my Grandfather could have been cleaning this gun up but for some unknown he had it in the shed instead of the house. I already have some carb cleaner here. Thanks all of you.
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Old 03-04-2015, 10:43 PM
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I bet it was a shotgun, and a Browning shotgun since they had gold triggers. That would be valuable if you could track that one down.
YES! That's it! Browning! My Dad still has it. He just never shoots it anymore. Wow, so now I know. Thanks that's exactly what it was. My Mom bought it for him as a Father's day gift many a year ago. My Dad was never a hunting/hobby kind of guy, but he liked that gun.

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Old 03-04-2015, 11:44 PM
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I will try to link the photos I have here. Notice on one photo it looks silver/chrome on only half of the gun. That is just the way the photo came out. The gun is dark all over. Thanks.

http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w32/FITAD/440_zpskzdyueut.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

Thank you.
I noticed silver/chrome area that you mentioned. I also noticed a very shiny spot in front of the thumb release to open the cylinder. These are areas that are more protected from normal wear. I suspect that the gun was nickel plated originally from the factory, and most of it is worn off.

Flitz polish or Mothers Mag Wheel polish applied while watching TV will give you a nice uniform silver finish. The 0000 bronze and oil will work on the more stubborn spots. The original finish is all but gone so there's no further harm that can be done, and it will look much better.
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Old 03-05-2015, 03:06 AM
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Quote:
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"...but no wonder it's that color since it was only wrapped in a cloth"

I remember seeing one gun which had been wrapped in a cloth during many years of storage, and there was a perfect image of the weave of the cloth rusted into the metal. Spray auto carb cleaner is also a good way to blast out the crud and corruption of years of dried oil and dirt in the works.
I have a colt 1900 that has a cloth pattern etched by rust into it
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Old 03-05-2015, 06:25 PM
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I noticed silver/chrome area that you mentioned. I also noticed a very shiny spot in front of the thumb release to open the cylinder. These are areas that are more protected from normal wear. I suspect that the gun was nickel plated originally from the factory, and most of it is worn off.

Flitz polish or Mothers Mag Wheel polish applied while watching TV will give you a nice uniform silver finish. The 0000 bronze and oil will work on the more stubborn spots. The original finish is all but gone so there's no further harm that can be done, and it will look much better.
Thanks will try the Flitz too. Have some of that around here somewhere.
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Old 03-11-2015, 03:22 AM
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Default Posted the other items in the other forums but what about these?

Hey all,

I posted the weird items over in the other forum and perhaps I'll get some information. I noticed there wasn't much info printed on them. However, what do you make out of these guns?

S&W...barrel is short on this one.







S&W...sort of looks like the other one I first posted except for the trigger being gold looking. Says Ruger-Bearcat (RG 38)



and this one...

Serial #732XX, .38 special, no screws on trigger guard.









Any info appreciate as it's 2 am and I just now downloaded the photos and realized I didn't get very good ones. But that's all the info I have right now. If you can't do anything with the photos I appreciate it. I will try and get better ones. Thanks in advance.

BTW, I haven't gotten the first gun cleaned up yet, but took it in to be checked out and it's fine. Brought it home and gave it a go...shoots fine.

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Old 03-11-2015, 04:01 AM
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Hi DixieDarlin,

The 1st is a Smith & Wesson Model of 1953 New I frame w/2" barrel for the .32 S&W long cartridge. The grips are correct. Pretty good condition with some rust freckling. Popular model.

#2 is Ruger Bearcat 6 shot single action for the .22 Long Rifle cartridge in very nice condition with only a little corrosion on the hammer. With gold anodized aluminum trigger guard and very collectible depending on the serial # which I can't read in the photo..

#3 is a S&W K frame 5 screw, Military & Police Model of 1905-1st Change for the .38 Special Cartridge made about 1906. It does have a screw in the front of the front of the trigger guard.Unfortunately the nickel plating is not the original finish which devalues it. The dark screw on the side is flat, an incorrect replacement.

Hope that's helpful.
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Old 03-11-2015, 04:12 AM
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Hi DixieDarlin,


#2 is Ruger Bearcat 6 shot single action for the .22 Long Rifle cartridge in very nice condition with only a little corrosion on the hammer. With gold anodized aluminum trigger guard and very collectible depending on the serial # which I can't read in the photo..


Hope that's helpful.
Wow, night owl too! Or early riser. Thanks Jim....the serial number for the Ruger-Bearcat one is 90-227XX.

Thank you so much with very little information to go on. You all are the best!

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Old 03-11-2015, 04:34 AM
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That's me the night owl, especially now that I'm recently retired. I don't know where your located but I'm likely west of you in CA, so not that late here yet.

The Ruger was made in 1970. An oldie but goodie!
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Old 03-12-2015, 03:01 AM
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That's me the night owl, especially now that I'm recently retired. I don't know where your located but I'm likely west of you in CA, so not that late here yet.

The Ruger was made in 1970. An oldie but goodie!
I'm on the Southeast...NW Florida. So late for me but I'm a night owl that tries to play early bird most of the time. Burning that candle at both ends. LOL Thanks again for all the info! Stinks when you find something someone had with no info whatsoever.

BTW, congratulations on the retirement!!!!

Last edited by DixieDarlin; 03-12-2015 at 03:33 PM.
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