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Old 04-20-2017, 10:43 PM
DSRichert DSRichert is offline
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Just acquired this pistol from my stepfather its missing the spring for the cylinder rod, the barrel is marked 32-20. No model # on the yoke.Any help with id and parts would be helpful and value if any. Thanks in advanceHelp identify family hand down-20170420_071808-jpgHelp identify family hand down-20170420_071759-jpgHelp identify family hand down-20170420_071731-jpg

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Old 04-20-2017, 10:59 PM
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Hi and welcome to the Forum.

What you have is a .32-20 Hand Ejector that has been heavily modified. Without the serial number, that we can speculate it was made in the 1922-1929 period. But the barrel has been chopped off and a different front sight has been attached. Also, the stocks are some sort of aftermarket replacement.

I don't know where the best place would be to find the part you need. I can tell you that the gun is a K frame. Others here may direct you to a source.
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Old 04-20-2017, 11:25 PM
Muley Gil Muley Gil is offline
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Welcome to the Forum.

S&W did not assign model numbers until 1957. The .32-20 chambering did not survive WW II.

Numrich Arms should be able to supply the springs you need. They will be the same as used on the pre WW II .38 special Military & Police.
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Old 04-20-2017, 11:54 PM
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The ejector rod shown is a later vintage part than that barrel. There should also be a number on the bottom of the barrel that matches the S/N on the butt of the grip frame. If it doesn't match, the barrel is a replacement. Check the back of the cylinder too. It should also have the same number as the butt. If they don't all match, your gun is essentially a "Franken-gun" and may need more than a spring to function correctly - and safely.

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Old 04-21-2017, 12:27 AM
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Notice the "P" stamp on the left side behind and above the cylinder. That's a government proof mark, and its presence suggests that this might have started out as a British Service Revolver in 1939 or 1940. The big logo on the sideplate along with the single line address points to the late '30s or early wartime years; before 1937 the logo would have been smaller and on the other side. I suspect this gun had a .32-20 barrel and cylinder substituted for the .38 S&W barrel that it would have carried originally. The jeweled treatment of hammer and trigger is not original, and the entire gun looks to me as though it was reblued at some point.

So: not a collector's item, but potentially a good shooter grade revolver for plinking and pest control.
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Old 04-21-2017, 09:37 AM
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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass!
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Old 04-21-2017, 10:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DCWilson View Post
Notice the "P" stamp on the left side behind and above the cylinder. That's a government proof mark, and its presence suggests that this might have started out as a British Service Revolver in 1939 or 1940. The big logo on the sideplate along with the single line address points to the late '30s or early wartime years; before 1937 the logo would have been smaller and on the other side. I suspect this gun had a .32-20 barrel and cylinder substituted for the .38 S&W barrel that it would have carried originally......
The P indeed can only mean that the frame was a wartime revolver, however manufactured between later 1943 and 1945. Before then, P proofs were not located there, but on the butt. While ex-BSR's were indeed much more commonly modified, the absence of any British post-war proofs makes it IMHO more likely that this gun started out as a US Victory model. Since the frames were identical and only the barrel and cylinder distinguish the two, probability is all we have, of course.
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Old 04-21-2017, 10:16 AM
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Absalom, thanks for correcting and improving my hasty answer. I kind of knew when I was composing it that I was missing something, but at the time I just didn't have the energy to think it through.
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Old 04-21-2017, 10:35 AM
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DSRichert,
Those appear to be the original "smooth" service stocks that the revolver left the factory with, but have been (rather well laid-out but lightly cut) skip-line checkered. If you check the inside, right grip panel, the serial number might be there in hand written pencil. You will need good light to see it.
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Old 04-21-2017, 10:42 AM
Muley Gil Muley Gil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jebstuart View Post
DSRichert,
Those appear to be the original "smooth" service stocks that the revolver left the factory with, but have been (rather well done) skip-line checkered. If you check the inside, right grip panel, the serial number might be there in hand written pencil. You will need good light to see it.
If this is a British Service Revolver (BSR), the serial number will be stamped inside of the right grip.

DSRichert, could you post the serial number found on the butt? If you prefer, you can X out the last two digits. Example: V123xx. Please include any letters found on the butt. Is there a hole drilled in the butt or evidence of a plugged hole?
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Old 04-21-2017, 12:01 PM
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I was thinking British Service Revolver myself initially when looking at the photos, especially since that front sight at first glance resembles the Parker-Hale sights which were installed on some of the BSR conversions done in Britain, but then again, a British conversion to .32-20 would be a first for me .

The number will be stamped as Muley says, not pencilled, both if the stocks belong to a BSR or a US frame.
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Old 04-21-2017, 01:53 PM
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The S&W logo on the sideplate would suggest it is post-1936. Therefore it is very likely not an original .32-20 frame, and could well be from a BSR. It is essential for a better identification that the SNs on the butt, barrel, and cylinder be provided. It's a very odd piece, and likely it has been put together from parts. Other than its personal value to you due to its family connection, its monetary value is minimal.

Last edited by DWalt; 04-21-2017 at 01:57 PM.
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