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S&W Hand Ejectors: 1896 to 1961 All 5-Screw & Vintage 4-Screw SWING-OUT Cylinder REVOLVERS, and the 35 Autos and 32 Autos


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  #51  
Old 10-10-2020, 01:10 AM
iskra iskra is offline
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Dad, departed quarter century ago, leaving me a little Colt .25 Auto, pix below. But ever so much more! 'The' model of honesty, integrity and hard work. Executive in large firm, never 'touchy-feely' dad-person, but ever 'there for me'. Died at 90, almost lifelong smoker, never heart or lung problems! His character-model & inspiration; big gifts to me yet giving!

Closing with the sort of chuclke he appreciated: WWII, ineligible for military service, a volunteer Air Raid Warden Captain... in a Midwestern city! Duly enforcing uphill battle of practice "Blackouts"! (Really!) Claiming correctly... Under his watch, no Nazi bombs ever to result from a single stray ray of local light!

Thanks for momentary 'sharing op' of super-dad small tribute'!
Best & Stay Safe!
John
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Old 10-10-2020, 01:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Art Doc View Post
No, you can't keep everything. But guns are special. A very personal possession.

I cannot be mercenary enough to be happy about inherited guns being sold because I can buy them.

I understand not everyone is interested in a gun. I always say ask before bequeathing a gun.

I realize this is a personal thing with me. Because I wish I had one of my dad's guns it bothers me when others are so cavalier about them.

Here's my dad in 1949 shooting a 7.5" Colt SAA along a Missouri road.

You can't be "mercenary enough " about inherited guns being sold? Where do you think auction houses receive guns from? Museum closures? What do you think, "from the collection of..." means in the auction catalog?

I realize that many who peruse this forum are older folks (including myself), but do you think the guns routinely featured in threads, pics, and collections were purchased new by the OPs?

So you're basically "sad" on how the majority of the collectible firearms market works, and has worked, for generations?

I'm really confused by your post.

P.S. Thanks for sharing the pic of your Dad. Great photo.

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Old 10-10-2020, 01:58 AM
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I'm still in possession of a couple of my dads hunting guns, both from the early 50's

A Remington 511 bolt action .22 rifle and a 12g Ithaca model 37 pump shotgun

Both still work but are beat to hell and back, wouldn't be worth anything except to me.

In fact those are my project guns, got some Mossy Oak gun skins, gonna turn them into new guns, ayep

Some people just don't appreciate old things

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Old 10-10-2020, 02:39 AM
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My dad passed away when I was two but my mom kept his Browning Auto 12 gauge for me. Long story, but she remarried a preacher who had lost his wife to cancer and he became my stepdad. Preacher loved to hunt and taught me, started me out on BB guns and finally to the Browning as a teen. He never touched it or used it. But, he respected what it meant. Years later I helped with his will and was his executor. He explained to me he wanted his firearms passed to his son. I understood. Traditions are important to me. However, stuff is stuff to some folks and I get it. I still cherish the old 12 and my stepdad who didnít have to be the man he was in my life.
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Old 10-10-2020, 07:52 AM
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Old 10-10-2020, 07:59 AM
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I really donít understand selling all of Dadís guns for a few dollars unless the money is needed desperately. Iíd keep at least one, even if I didnít happen to be a diehard powder-burner. (At least I think I would. ) But weíre all different and lots of the younger generation donít know one end of a gun from the other, and couldnít care less. Not being judgmental here, and I donít really see the OP was being so either.

Iím lucky to have four of my Dadís weapons. I still enjoy shooting them now and then. Three of them he owned when I was just a lad. I bought the fourth for him when he thought he needed a handgun for protection. (Unfortunately, it turned out to be a poor choice, on my part. ) They all have fond memories associated with them, but those memories only mean anything to me.
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Old 10-10-2020, 08:56 AM
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As one who has liquidated an estate, I can say your treasured possessions for the most part will end up with a 25 cent to $1 tag on them at the estate sale.
Collectables especially. My mom had a nice set of China but because it wasn't Wedgwood or Lenox it went for practically nothing. Same with Crystal - young women aren't interested in fancy place settings.
Inherited gun? SKB semiauto I use for skeet shooting. Would I trade/sell it? Yes. In the words of the pawn star guy, everything has a story and everything has a price.
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Old 10-10-2020, 09:14 AM
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My Father passed away three years ago. He had lived with me his last eleven years. My father had a few guns, none of which I will sell. He had a post 64 Winchester 94 30-30 that he sanded the **** out of the end of the buttstock so he could mount a rubber recoil pad. I was contemplating replacing the buttstock. I took the rifle out yesterday to clean it up. While looking at the buttstock, an image of my father appeared in my head. I could see him sanding the stock. I have decided to leave the rifle as is.
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Old 10-10-2020, 09:55 AM
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Things change. Generations dilute traditions and societal norms change tastes in activities and morals.
My daughters interest in guns ranges from passive to nonexistent. There is really no point in passing any of my guns on to them, but they will each get a couple. What they do with them is of no concern to me. It used to be, but as I said, things changes.
If I were to turn the tables and see what I would inherit from them, I would have no interest in anything they own at this time.
Completely understandable that they would likewise have little interest in what I have in the way of firearms.
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Old 10-10-2020, 10:22 AM
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Save some tax payments, legal fees, and future stress-

Communication is important. While alive, we have the opportunity to directly converse our wishes and receive input about others wishes. Make sure to have them documented in an estate plan and trusted personal representative to make the estate disbursements appropriately. The conversations are difficult, there is expense involved, and mental gymnastics have to be performed. The end result is the best we have to try and cover all the bases to leave a legacy that helps loved ones improve their situation or continue our remembrance.

If this is not done, and to the chagrin of many who have or will go through the process, will find out that money or hard assets reveal peoples true motivations in a prolonged and contested estate probate court proceeding where anything may happen except for what you thought but didnít write down. Take the initiative to leave a structured legacy that you and the persons you care about are satisfied with upon disbursement.

See both sides to this coin every working day and have been though it a few times.
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Old 10-10-2020, 11:13 AM
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I agree itís sad. I also agree plastic guns donít have that same allure as a classic revolver or semi auto. I have a few plastic guns and I canít imagine passing those down. My kids gravitate towards a nice revolver or traditional semi auto. Thereís just not the collectibility there for a Glock or any other modern plastic weapon.
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Old 10-10-2020, 12:53 PM
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When I retired from the Eff-Bee-Eye I gave my duty guns away, not seeing any point in waiting til Iím dead to do it. I made personalized cases for each gun and included a handwritten letter about each one and some of the adventures we had together.

My oldest gun nut son got my Sig P220. My youngest gun nut son got my Glock 27. My gun nut nephew (whoís lived with us since his Dad died) got my 870.

My beloved purple-haired (this week!) liberal daughter got my Model 36. She cried when I gave it to her but asked if I would keep it in my safe for her. I get it - sheís just not into guns. No problem.

Also - not everyone wants to remember their dear old Dad. The memory they may associate with that P&R Model 19 might be Mom getting her teeth loosened with it.
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Old 10-10-2020, 02:29 PM
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My own father is knocking on 83 and has a modest collection of 20-30. He has taken the time to visit with each grand child and asked them if there is anything particular in his safe that they would like to have upon his passing. My siblings either have their own or are not gun people so he bypassed us and went right to the grand kids. My son being the wisest of the group said he would like to have the safe (nice Fort Knox). He has a decent start at 24yo, but no safe yet. He also piped up about an old civil war musket that has traveled down the family tree. Last I heard dad was on the fence with that one---either my son or a museum.
Beware of museums. Once you give them anything, there is no guarantee they will display it or even keep it. Especially in these troubled times, curators with an anti-gun bias tend to liquidate firearms in their collections.
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Old 10-10-2020, 05:59 PM
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I have (in my opinion) only a few guns compared to most here. I bought my daughter a shield that she shoots when I take her to the range. I've got one stepson (USAF) who will get my other guns when I go. He's not really interested in them but I hope his son (my two year old grandson) will want them when he grows up. I have a good friend who's dad passed and left so many guns that after they'd been picked through by the kids he still had three gun safe's worth. I know him well enough to know he'll never get rid of them while he lives and his kids are all hunters and gun nuts so the family collection is in good hands.
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Old 10-10-2020, 06:24 PM
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I am thinking about my collection. I have told my wife where to take them for a consignment sale, but I'd really rather give them to my relatives. Nobody is interested at all. My son was a history major in college, but a Civil War war musket or a Spencer carbine is not of interest to him. I finally got tired of asking my grandkids, nephews, nieces and any anybody else. So the valuable ones get sold, and the working ones get given to people who appreciate them. So far, I gave four 16 and 20 gauge pumps along cases of ammo to four young guys, grandsons of a friend. They had been shooting .410's on our dove field. Then I gave an Ithaca 37 to my friend to round out the family gifts. I met a young woman who was working with a dog trainer and was going duck hunting with a borrowed shotgun. She got the 870 Magnum with screw in chokes. I gave a .32 to a woman who was concerned for her safety. I plan to keep on doing this until I run out of guns or until I run out.
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Old 10-11-2020, 04:40 AM
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I have read this thread, reading along as it progresses, and I'll have to admit it changed my whole thought process with regards to the subject matter.

Initially, had I posted immediately to the OP, or at least had been one of the first responders, I would have agreed: Tragic indeed! But as the thread progressed, I realized that there is another side to the coin, and it's something I, and many of us, have used to our best advantage. Also, society/values change, lifestyle decisions often come into play, life, in general, is unpredictable, etc.

Before I progress, I am always willing to provide a good home to that antique or vintage Smith & Wesson revolver your kids detest, LOL!

First, it is probable that If you collect antique or vintage firearms, as I do, one or more pieces came from an heir who decided they didn't want their father's or grandfather's old gun. They had to have, and this is an OPPORTUNITY, to collect quality firearms. I know that two Smith & Wesson revolvers I have purchased recently were nice inherited revolvers, one being a 3rd Model Perfected Single Shot pistol that two sisters inherited upon their father's passing. They had no use for it and sold it. The second is a .44 DA Frontier which was once owned by a Connecticut U S Senator who passed away over 70 years ago now. His heirs just did not lead the same lifestyle he did, and thus had little interest in firearms. Attached are two photographs of that firearm. Also pictured is a photograph of a Colt Camp Perry pistol from the same collection. Both purchased at auction, as consigned by the heirs. The reality is, where would one find nice stuff such as these unless an heir somewhere decided they no longer wanted them? You would be limited to the same old recycled firearms, passed only from dealer to dealer, collector to collector, all originally obtained from the estate of someone with no heirs.. It would be the same stale inventory with no surprises! Even the good Senator obtained both of these firearms second hand as the ship location of the Smith & Wesson revolver was to a destination that suggests, but is by no means conclusive, that the senator was not the original owner. The Colt was shipped to a Colt employee. Perhaps purchased by the Senator, but not shipped directly to the Senator nor to, what I was hoping, a prominent individual who might have presented this to the Senator upon election to the Senate, as this revolver was brand new when the Senator was elected. This Senator and President Hoover were good friends and he even rented Hoover's private residence from him as Hoover had vacated it to move to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. No such luck...

Next, lifestyles change, life is unpredictable. The last two photographs depict a farm I wanted to buy earlier this year and a vintage butcher's wagon featured at the massive estate sale there. To me, the property was perfect, and full of neat items I appreciate, although no firearms. The owners were major collectors and the father even wrote the book on Pennsylvania fraktur, their history and design. They passed away, and the daughter sold everything. Well, there was so much there, she might have kept a few items, but not much. But, lifestyles change. When she showed me the house, I think she cherished the memories, but little else. Also, she had married and her job was not within commuting distance of the property. The butcher's wagon is neat, but I don't own it. That is illustrated to prove a point. I don't own it as I had nowhere to put it. Firearms are smaller, but your heirs might just lack anywhere to put them. I should also mention that property was perfect for me, based on where I work, etc., and what I value. The heir may not have valued this, or, if she did, where she worked made this prohibitive. My wife certainly didn't appreciate this property.

Folks go to university, just as I did, or go into the service, etc. Unless one lives near a major employer that is willing to hire at decent wages, one has to move, sometimes frequently, maybe renting from apartment complexes that aren't gun friendly. Even if they don't care, I'm sure the neighboring apartment dwellers will question why one keeps carrying into the apartment many long objects in cases repeatedly...

Personally, I thought I would never leave where I grew up. I went to the local university, got a fairly useless undergraduate degree that provided little else than the ability to think critically, and somehow expected to waltz into the door of some major corporation and earn the big bucks. This, despite there being no major, and few minor, employers in the area. I still haven't figured out how to telecommute now, so that wasn't an option then. Commuting 37 miles one way to a job with no benefits that paid 50 cents more than minimum wage forced me to make a lifestyle change really quickly!

In addition to that, colleges these days are so liberal, unless one sticks to their beliefs, after 4 years of that, one would come to the conclusion that all firearms are evil and should be banned. With such rhetoric, no wonder kids wouldn't appreciate dad's or granddad's old guns.

Lastly, folks just don't appreciate the past. That property sold with multiple offers for nearly 20% over the asking price, but that's because of the real estate market now. Even so, 75% if those who looked at it turned away really quickly because it was old, said it needed too much work. It was completely habitable inside, one bathroom was nearly new! But folks don't appreciate such things in a normal real estate market. They want new, New, NEW. Put up new houses in a development, watch them sell like hotcakes, even if there's little land and all components are cheaply produced in China. Meanwhile, that solid post and beam historic house with land sits on the market, often later razed to make way for several new homes.

So, in this lengthy post, a few take home messages. Folks may simply not appreciate what you do. It might be their values are different than yours, maybe society has caused this shift. Their lifestyles may be different, and maybe not by choice. And most individuals like new stuff, period!

But, like I said, this thread caused me to think differently about this whole concept. A tragedy for some, an opportunity for others!
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Old 10-11-2020, 08:55 AM
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I have 5 children. Of the 5, 2 are boys. Of the boys I could see "maybe" they would want one of my guns as an inheritance to keep as a memory. The girls no interest what so ever.They would all take them l so they could sell them but have no idea what they are worth or there histories. I bought my 1st son a new Browning 20 gauge pump when he was born in 1985. I kept it in the box stored until he was old enough to hunt. But he never wanted to hunt. So when he was 18 I presented it to him anyway as his birthday heirloom from Pop. We went and shot it one or 2 times. When he is in his 30s he asks me if t's ok if he sells it? I was crushed of course. I had him sell it to me.
So about 2 years ago I decided that there was no gun that I was keeping for inheritance purposes. I would much rather sell them myself while I am alive and get a fair market value than have them or even my wife try to wholesale them off after I am dead.
You cannot tell make your family interested in what interests you.
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Old 10-11-2020, 09:27 AM
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I parted with my Dad's GP100, last week. I shot it several times, when we went hunting or to the range. I shot that gun better than he did, which meant something to me, because we were both so competitive, whether we were fishing, skiing, shooting, or debating politics. Whatever the "game", he usually won, but I could always outshoot him with that revolver.
He passed in April 2019, and I was tasked with distributing his weapons to the family. Nephew got the Ruger 77, 7mm Mag. BIL#1 ended up with the Browning A5, 12 gauge. I got the Beretta BL-3, Belgian A5 Light Twelve, Winchester 70, in .223, and the GP100. As much as I thought I had a sentimental attachment to that GP100, it made me feel all warm and fuzzy to send it off to sister #2. She and her husband are recent empty nesters, and starting to build a gun collection, and I hadn't shot that GP100, but twice, during my stewardship. She was thrilled that I offered it to her, and I know it's going to a good home.
I hope that my kids and my sisters' kids keep Dad's guns in the family. Hunting and shooting were some of my dad's favorite activities. They can do whatever they want with my other guns, but it would be nice if some of these classic Smiths stayed in the family, just because they are works of industrial art that will never be duplicated.

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Old 10-11-2020, 10:18 AM
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Not to call you out jmace as others have posted similar things, but as a general question as I really don't understand it:

How does it happen that kids of a gun collector wind up being "anti-gun"? My kids shoot guns in my collection and the older ones have started getting their own- each of them has their faves, but all of them like guns and shooting.
I wish I knew. I suspect part of it is that when my kids were growing up, we always lived in the middle of big cities, where actually going out and shooting was rare. I grew up with the opportunity of shooting with both grandparents owning ranches. I appreciate the history and the mechanics of the guns I collect. My kids now live in big, "liberal" cities and are married to "liberal" spouses. I've tried to have 2nd Amendment conversations, but haven't changed their minds.
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Old 10-11-2020, 10:22 AM
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I have 5 children. Of the 5, 2 are boys. Of the boys I could see "maybe" they would want one of my guns as an inheritance to keep as a memory. The girls no interest what so ever.They would all take them l so they could sell them but have no idea what they are worth or there histories. I bought my 1st son a new Browning 20 gauge pump when he was born in 1985. I kept it in the box stored until he was old enough to hunt. But he never wanted to hunt. So when he was 18 I presented it to him anyway as his birthday heirloom from Pop. We went and shot it one or 2 times. When he is in his 30s he asks me if t's ok if he sells it? I was crushed of course. I had him sell it to me.
So about 2 years ago I decided that there was no gun that I was keeping for inheritance purposes. I would much rather sell them myself while I am alive and get a fair market value than have them or even my wife try to wholesale them off after I am dead.
You cannot tell make your family interested in what interests you.
I had a Walther PP my Dad captured from a German officer during WW2. While my son appreciated the historic nature of it, it would not have surprised me that he would have taken it to a gun "buyback" if I had given it to him. I gave it to my nephew and know he will keep it forever and give to his son when the time comes.
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Old 10-11-2020, 10:53 AM
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Thats unfortunate, but in some level I can understand and disagree, anybody who knows me in here knows I buy and sell how I feel, some things I'm happy with some things I'm not.... why am I saying that? Some people get in a hard way need the cash, some people just don't know, some just don't care.... I have my fathers Python (bought it from him) the one that started it all, he used it on duty his first couple of years in MICHIGAN, but it means the world to me and ill keep it until I can pass it to my Boy.. really its the only on that matters to me just because its sentimental to me...
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Old 10-11-2020, 11:33 AM
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Originally Posted by jmace57 View Post
I wish I knew. I suspect part of it is that when my kids were growing up, we always lived in the middle of big cities, where actually going out and shooting was rare. I grew up with the opportunity of shooting with both grandparents owning ranches. I appreciate the history and the mechanics of the guns I collect. My kids now live in big, "liberal" cities and are married to "liberal" spouses. I've tried to have 2nd Amendment conversations, but haven't changed their minds.
That's just it. The problem is in order to succeed financially, unless one is the entrepreneurial sort, one has to go to college. Most professors are out of touch with reality. If one is not brainwashed during four years of college, there is a strong chance that their spouse might be. And, the good jobs are in the cities, even during the Coronavirus times, and cities do not reflect a hunting culture, a rural way of life, for obvious reasons. And one's colleagues are a product of that brainwashing as well, and so it is a very anti-firearm culture in the cities and suburbs. The big question is how did academia become so liberal, and how did the cities as well? My in-laws have never owned firearms and they have more conservative values. Moderates, but support Trump. One of my wife's sisters is so liberal, and met a like minded spouse, that some of the stuff that comes out of their mouth, you wonder if they are serious about it all. They are a reflection of the direction society is going.
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Old 10-11-2020, 11:42 AM
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I would much rather sell them myself while I am alive and get a fair market value than have them or even my wife try to wholesale them off after I am dead.
That's definitely the way to plan, for estate purposes. Again, if you had brought up this topic a few years ago, I would have said absolutely not, but most heirs these days view an inheritance as a burden. They would probably just have the cash. Besides, you know your firearms better than anybody. You can probably get a better return on your investment selling them than your heirs could, wholesaling them out.

I see no future in "brown" vintage guns. The few left who even will be interested in firearms in the next half century or so will have lots to pick from, so they can focus only on guns with condition, and pay diminished prices on those due to too much supply and little demand.

It's just for that reason alone that I am thinking of parting with an antique firearm that I appreciate, but has little upside over the long term. It is definitely a "brown" gun, which is unusual as most of my antique firearms have condition, to some degree. I don't want to part with it, but as I see little appreciation, if any, in the short term, and probably little interest (hence, decreasing value) in the long term, it's probably time to let it go.

An auctioneer I discussed this with stated that Civil War stuff is really starting to reflect the change in values, much less interest recently. The firearm I have is a lever action Winchester, mid 1880's.
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Old 10-11-2020, 11:45 AM
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And if you sell them yourself and turn it into cash, you can pass that cash to your heirs without estate tax, if you pass it as folding money while you are still living.
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Old 10-11-2020, 11:48 AM
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When a new member describes a gun inherited from a father and asks what it's worth so he can sell it? My dad had a small number of firearms and died when I was very young. Mom had to sell the guns so we could eat. All I have are some old photos in an album of him hunting with a Winchester Model 12 and plinking with a 1G Colt SAA. I would give anything to have just one of his guns. It breaks my heart to see guys so absolutely disinterested in keeping their dads' guns.

Oh well. I guess everyone has his own priorities.
I was very fortunate to inherit part of dad's collection. I will never sell them. Ever
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Old 10-11-2020, 11:56 AM
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I have about 300 guns in the collection right now and only one kid. What the hell is she going to do with them all? At some point they become a burden.

Family mementoes and junk are two different things. My mother's collection of little terracotta houses hanging on the wall is junk. As is my collection of police uniform patches.

I hope my kid is able to cash out on my stuff and enjoy life. If she wants to keep a few, fine. Like her Great Grandfather's Model 64 snubnose or her Grandfather's retirement GLOCK 19, or maybe her Mom's AR-15 or my Model 342Ti that I carry all the time off duty.

But honestly.... it is the memories that are worth something. Not the item itself. Out of all my Grandfather's stuff, I kept his ashtray, watch, and gun. Every else went by the wayside to other family members or my Grandmother cashed out on its value.
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Old 10-11-2020, 12:00 PM
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Originally Posted by jmace57 View Post
I wish I knew. I suspect part of it is that when my kids were growing up, we always lived in the middle of big cities, where actually going out and shooting was rare. I grew up with the opportunity of shooting with both grandparents owning ranches. I appreciate the history and the mechanics of the guns I collect. My kids now live in big, "liberal" cities and are married to "liberal" spouses. I've tried to have 2nd Amendment conversations, but haven't changed their minds.
Meh, I grew up in Miami. Went shooting all the time. And Miami is nothing but a concrete jungle. Again, had no problem growing up shooting and hunting.
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Old 10-11-2020, 12:05 PM
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I was very fortunate to inherit part of dad's collection. I will never sell them. Ever
And then what happens?

It's possible, of course, that you have heirs that appreciate them as well. The tone of this thread suggests that is increasingly uncommon.
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Old 10-11-2020, 12:17 PM
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First, it is probable that If you collect antique or vintage firearms, as I do, one or more pieces came from an heir who decided they didn't want their father's or grandfather's old gun. They had to have, and this is an OPPORTUNITY, to collect quality firearms.
I popped into this thread to say just this.

I would add that I feel it important to try to grab as much information about the past owners as possible, and try to do so on all my guns as I have the time and bandwidth to do it. Even if their families don't appreciate the guns, the guns can sometimes tell those outside the family who the owners were. I feel like with the really good guns this is a big part of the fun.


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Originally Posted by gfors View Post
They can do whatever they want with my other guns, but it would be nice if some of these classic Smiths stayed in the family, just because they are works of industrial art that will never be duplicated.
Industrial Design is appreciated, and I think will become more appreciated as time moves forward.

My plan is to amass a collection of guns that are beautiful pieces of industrial design, coupled with artisan level craftsmanship in after market grips (where the originals are lost), and all the history I can attach to them.

If my child(ren hopefully) is/aren't interested in the guns themselves, nor the history, nor the artistry, then so be it, I intend the auction of my collection to be a good one.

Between the craftsmanship of S&W, and amazing nature of the SWHF, I feel like the majority of my collection will likely always be S&Ws along with accessories. But back to mrcvs' point; without others being uninterested in their family's guns, I'd never have the opportunity. So if the time comes and my kids are more interested in other things, I'll do my best to remember this and not be sad about it.
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Old 10-11-2020, 12:40 PM
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And another...
I have another neighbor who grew up in the Pacific Northwest, his father was a game warden/Ranger in that area. As a boy he learned to shoot with an old model 12 Remington pump .22. I didn't know any of this until a few years ago when he had to return to his father's home and deal with the estate. He gave most of his dads stuff to a couple of uncles but brought the model 12 home with him. He asked me to come over and look at a few things he brought back and ended up giving me a couple of knives from his dad's stuff. This neighbor does not hunt/fish/hike or otherwise spend time outdoors other than walking his dogs. We have always joined him on Sunday mornings for a long dog walk with his and ours. He mentioned this old rifle he had brought and showed it to me. He related learning to shoot it as a boy. But otherwise had little interest in it. I mentioned I liked it and that if he wanted he could go shoot it sometime when we were going out. He said he'd think about that. About 6 months later he called and said that since I helped them out by plowing their driveway when it snowed he thought I should just have the 22. I meant nothing to him despite it's history. So now it resides with me and my other vintage 22s. I'm glad to have it but it struck me as odd that it meant so little to him. Here it is at the bottom of the picture. Other than the Nylon 66 I bought at a gun shop in the '70s all these 22s have similar stories.
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Old 10-11-2020, 08:08 PM
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Could not agree with you more sir. I have three (3) of my dadís guns from his hunting days. He never had any handguns, that is my area. But I would be very hard pressed to ever sell them.
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Old 10-12-2020, 01:01 PM
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This past summer I retrieved three rifles from my childhood. One was a Eastern Arms 16 gauge double barrel (side by side) shotgun; a Springfield Model 86C tube feed, bolt action 22LR (I learned to shoot with this rifle); and a Mossberg Model 152 semi automatic 22LR. A lot of good times when I was a kid.

When my uncle passed away he gave me and other cousins the souvenirs he brought back from WWII. I received a 9mm DWM Lugar and a Mauser 1934 7.65mm (32 cal) pistol and holster. I treasure these guns.

I also have S&W 38 special Victory model.

My only problem is that I have no one to pass them to. It's a shame that they will be given away. Someone will be lucky one day.

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Old 10-12-2020, 08:08 PM
Dave.357 Dave.357 is online now
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Very few of the guns in my collection
have any family history. And I am
Only taking one with me.i have
listed the ones that have family
history the hell with the rest.
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Old 10-13-2020, 12:02 AM
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I own a few guns. Lets just say, more than 10...
I like them. I buy all kinds, just because. Some are cheap. Some are not.
But, I guess I have a fair amount tied up in them. If I died, I could not expect my son to keep all (uh, I think it was 'ten' ), of them? If I left him a house, would I insist he live in it?
I would expect him to liquidate most of them. Some people have stocks and shares, I have metal and wood. Polymer too.

Now, all that said, if we are talking about one gun, and I believe the OP was talking about the one gun that the dad passed on, well that is different.

Have a Winchester 94 and a Browning BPR-22 in 22 mag (apparently pretty rare in 22 mag) from my father-in-law. Not ever selling those.

Now, (really my last point!), if my family needed to eat, pretty sure my father-in-law would rather I sell it and take care of what I need to take care of than keep it.
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Old 10-14-2020, 07:25 PM
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Estate matters. First as comment above, just 'heads up' IF any estate/inheritance tax issues to be considered in estate plan.

Super-senior, I labored for some recent years with 'guilt' of not liquidating most of a large collection for benefit of my several sons. None with any intrest in guns whatsoever! Then the lightbulb and already quite frank "heads up & feel lucky" several sons briefing.

To the effect... Each notified of my intent and provided with like computer file documents: Copies of: XL Spreadsheet and multi-photo inventory featuring full specimen ID. Also my 'proximate valuation brief 'why' if something special. Each piece also physically tagged & cross indexed by such number to pix and XL.
Words to sons... I'm passing on considerable value! You each have sufficient informaton to retain, sell for value or 'informed' determination otherwise. Kindly, don't look a gift horse in the mouth! A matter of when I do pass... An "Off & On Guys!"

Now... I'm off the gulit trip for not liquidating them. Wish anybody had given me a quite large gun collection of anything of value... FREE!

My 'no muss, no fuss' personal property estate plan' as wife takes a substantial 'all other'.

Estate matter... "Handled!"
Best & Stay Safe!
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Old 10-15-2020, 01:08 AM
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Dad was a collector, hunter, re loader of a sort and most of his guns went to my brother and now I am collecting for my kids and grand kids, But he had a saying that he used to quote to me as far as liking guns. ( The reason horse racing is so great is because everyone likes something different, same with guns. I have only one gun that I won't pass on and will make all others like more valuable, my 1950 S&W Target 6.5" 44 Special will go in the casket with me,
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Old 10-18-2020, 11:31 PM
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My father left a large high end camera collection dating to the pre ww2 era. My interest in photography is zero as was my father's interest in my gun hobby. Rather than selling this collection for what could have been a lot of $$ which was offered, I donated this collection to the George Eastman Photo museum in Rochester NY. Many of his pieces are now there on display. I figure this was the best way to honor him.
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Old 10-19-2020, 07:17 AM
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... my 1950 S&W Target 6.5" 44 Special will go in the casket with me,
I can't understand that type of thinking. I am not an Egyptian Pharaoh who believed he needs provisions for the afterlife. Better that it should go to someone, even a stranger, who can use it on this side of the grass.

Besides, if I make it to Heaven, I won't need it, and it sure won't do me much good in the alternate destination!
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Old 10-19-2020, 07:34 AM
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As much as guns mean to us and have meant to our ancestors does not mean it is the same for everyone. My real father had a "sporterized" 303 British. He only took it out at hunting season. A nephew has it now. I have a ring my father wore. The ring meant more to him than the rifle did. My step dad was an avid shooter and had a nice variety of rifles. He made up each of us kids an 06. I pasted mine to my son. I still have my step-dads 30-338. Other brothers have other guns. It is not going anywhere. My son that I taught to hunt and gave the 06 to, was killed in a car wreck. His mom has no idea where the rifle or model 28, and pump shotgun I gave him went. My other son has cerebral palsy and worshiped at the "Temple of the University". He has no interest in me or guns.

But, that aside, my paternal Grandfather was a real cowboy. His gun was a 25-35 saddle ring carbine. I shot my first deer with it. One of my brothers has it. I have his hand forged spurs. Those spurs hang on my wall. They mean a lot to me. Would I lie that 25-35. I would loveit. Some people would rather have the spurs. Some people granpas plane and brace and bit drill.

Just because they don't keep the gun don't mean they didn't care or keep something of the memories.
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Old 10-19-2020, 09:14 AM
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I can't understand that type of thinking. I am not an Egyptian Pharaoh who believed he needs provisions for the afterlife. Better that it should go to someone, even a stranger, who can use it on this side of the grass.

Besides, if I make it to Heaven, I won't need it, and it sure won't do me much good in the alternate destination!
Well I have plenty and gaining more for my kids and my ancestors were Northern Scot ( Celt ) and were burried with their arms also I will take my personal prize possession with me. you are welcome to do what you want with yours, but please don't lecture me with what to do with mine. Not trying to offend any one, but they are mine at the present and if anyone wanted them they should have bought them before I did.
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Old 10-19-2020, 09:46 AM
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My point was there is no concrete right or wrong. What is true for one family isn't always true for another.

One guy wants buried with his model 29 and another guy is content to have a stranger shoot it. As long as they are satisfied thats great
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Old 10-19-2020, 11:31 AM
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Arkansas is not and has never been a very rich state, and is not very urban. Over the years I have noticed about the only thing this is passed down, are firearms. And somehow they are kept in the family. Of course they often end up with what I call an Arkansas finish. Bought used, repaired a little, passed down, repaired again, and so on. But they are kept in the family. My great grandfather's 42 caliber J. Henry & Sons muzzle loading plains rifle was used by a couple of my cousins for squirrel hunting until they were drafted in WW2, and it has been passed on down since then.
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Old 10-19-2020, 01:07 PM
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Gee, I guess it would be a major faux pas to show up at the gates of Valhalla with no weapons.
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Old 10-19-2020, 02:39 PM
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I will always have my mouth. LOL
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Old 10-20-2020, 05:39 PM
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Several years ago I was set up with Bobby O'Shields (Lee will remember him) at the Expo show and a fellow came in with his grandfathers old gun, with gold picture box, SAT and all. It seems that many collector pieces end up being sold like that. This one, a 6" pre-27 is one of my prized possessions. My son and daughter will do battle over it. They both enjoy owning and shooting all kinds of guns.

Top left in the display case.
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