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Old 08-23-2010, 10:02 AM
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Default .32 S&W Long Model 30 Snubnose

Sock Drawer Neglect Victim! Any recommendations to refinish? Its a tight gun that I doubt has ever been fired, however is a .32. What ammo can it digest? Anyone know when it was built Serial # 677949 ?
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Old 08-23-2010, 01:08 PM
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Normally here on the forum we don't recommend refinishing. Depends on how bad it is.
You can shoot .32 S&W, .32 S&W Long, and .32 ACP in a pinch.
The SCS&W lists postwar serial numbers from 1946-1960 as 536685-712953. So if it is stamped M-30, it would be around 1957 at least.
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Old 08-23-2010, 05:46 PM
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Thanks for the info..........Is there any ammo with any useful performance available or is all of it made for pot metal guns?
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Old 08-23-2010, 06:10 PM
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Whether to refinish or not is entirely up to you. If you would like it to look more to your satisfaction, by all means go for it. Recognize, however, that there is a big difference in what is worthwhile aesthetically and what is worthwhile economically.

As for the ammo question, anything that is available commercially for that one will be conservative/moderate in performance. It can be stepped up a little with careful handloading, but not much. If more shove is needed another chambering is indicated. I load .32 Long for a late '40's vintage Hand Ejector and enjoy it for what it is: accurate, economical, easy to shoot. Have fun.
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Old 08-23-2010, 06:27 PM
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A picture would help
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Old 08-23-2010, 10:15 PM
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Due to arthritis, my wife shoots a Model 30. The light recoil doesn't hurt her hand.
We keep it loaded with Magtech 98gr SJHPs. Excellent ammo, very accurate. Probably the only decent factory defense ammo avalible.
The .32 ain't no power house, but in a pinch it sure beats harsh language.
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Old 08-24-2010, 02:25 AM
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Geogia Arms sells a 32 long using 85 gr JHP advertised at 850 FPS.
bullets look to be Hydoshocks.

Last edited by gagunner 2; 08-24-2010 at 02:35 AM.
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Old 08-24-2010, 10:21 AM
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Doesn't sound like anything but a good solid shooter; not worth the cost of refinishing to most folks. But if you have the coins and it satisfies you to have it looking nice, go for it - just don't expect to ever sell it and recover the investment. You'll spend minimum $150 to $250 on a quality refinish ( I would recommend hard chrome, Metal-life or some such over blue for durability) and still have a piece you can't sell for what an as-new-in-the-box specimen will bring, or even a well cared for shooter to most folks.

Is it a tool or a keepsake/heirloom? Aside from the purists' revulsion at refinishing any old gun, I tend to look at it as the kind of thing that we see all the time . . . people spending $$$ on fancy wheels and tires on a *** vehicle that won't last near as long as your revolver or major bucks on a stereo-system for a car - because it's their money and it makes them happy. Or the guy who spends the extra 100 bucks on nice golf bag that does nothing to improve his game - because he can afford it and he likes the way it looks when he plays the course. It gives them personal satisfaction. Some people who appreciate the history and journey of a fine mechanism like a firearm look at every ding and rubbed spot as a sign of the character the gun picks up along the way and that gives them personal satisfaction - and refinishing it is like painting a hat on the Mona Lisa to them.

To me, refinishing a non-collectible gun I will likely keep and use for the purpose of increasing it's durability and protection against deterioration falls in the personal satisfaction category - if I can afford it and it pleases me, I don't care what others think. To each his own.
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Old 08-25-2010, 10:31 AM
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Cheap to shoot, low recoil, practice gun and the fact of life it isn't anything but a tool. I think I will just enjoy it. Thanks
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Old 08-25-2010, 10:55 AM
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I just got back 2 from S&W to have re blued.They came back excellent for about $200 each.(if you must)
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Old 08-25-2010, 12:07 PM
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patrick james---Did S&W mark your guns in any way to signify the refinish???
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Old 08-25-2010, 06:59 PM
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Some photo's of that refinish would really be nice
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Old 08-28-2010, 10:16 PM
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Forsyth793:

Is it rusted/pitted, or just blue-worn? Pitting can't be corrected without major restoration- not worth the trouble & expense. Worn bluing can be fixed, but my fix would make a serious collector/purist fall in a swoon.

If you want to try it, Google "Van's Gun Blue" and order some from the company. It is far and away the best cold-touchup bluing solution to be found IMHO. Take the gun down to major subassemblies (cylinder and frame), degrease it thoroughly, and get yourself some new, clean 3M fiber pads. Cut a small square of the 3M pad, soak it with Van's, and start rubbing gently. The slightly abrasive 3M pad cuts off the oxide layer that forms on the metal and allows the solution to penetrate, so the more you rub, the deeper and richer the blue gets. When it looks right, wipe down with a clean paper towel and oil the metal well, and reassemble.

I have done a number of guns like this and they have all turned out well.

I gotta say this, folks: When working with bluing solutions and degreasers, ALWAYS WEAR CHEMICAL-RESISTANT GLOVES AND DO IT IN A WELL-VENTILATED AREA! (sorry to yell, but I just got through a bout of bladder cancer after having slathered chlorinated solvents on my hands and arms for 40 years or so. Dunno if that had anything to do with it, but why take the chance?)

Good luck, and enjoy that little .32, regardless of whether or not you decide to refinish it. I have a little .38 Terrier that had seen hard days before I got it. I gave it the Van's treatment, and it looks very nice now, even after a couple years of carry in a pocket holster. Like the .32, it's no powerhouse, but it's accurate and fun.

Best,
Snuffy2
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Old 08-29-2010, 09:39 AM
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Great info Gun Bluing Made Easy With Van's Instant Gun Blue! I will have some of that next week.

Thanks
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:21 PM
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Smith and Wesson did not mark the guns as far as I can see.One was a model 10 police trade and the other was a model 36 no dash.both Revolvers was from the early 1970's and had wear and a few pitts.When I got them both back they looked BRAND new.This is the truth.

Project complete.I'm Happy !
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