Smith & Wesson Forum

Go Back   Smith & Wesson Forum > Smith & Wesson Revolvers > S&W Revolvers: 1961 to 1980
Forum Register Expert Commentary Members List


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-10-2012, 03:57 PM
PALADIN85020's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Arizona
Posts: 5,071
Likes: 537
Liked 9,814 Times in 1,362 Posts
Default The K-22 Masterpiece (Model 17): a brief history

This is a piece that's in progress for eventual publication in The Blue Press. I'd welcome constructive comments. Thanks!

John



This classic Smith & Wesson .22 caliber target revolver had its beginnings way back in the early 1930s and is now discontinued, yet it is still an extremely popular item among both shooters and collectors. It serves the needs of target shooters wanting a companion piece to .38 caliber target revolvers as well as filling a niche for a field revolver suitable for small game. A more accurate .22 wheel gun has never been made, and S&W was entirely correct in calling it a “Masterpiece.”

A medium-size frame (factory designated as the K-frame) .38 Special revolver with target sights was first offered by Smith & Wesson in 1899. This was the .38 Hand Ejector Target, sometimes called the .38 Military and Police Target. It quickly became a favorite with many competitive target shooters, and many U.S. Revolver Association records were set with it. Over a number of years since the introduction of that arm, a growing demand developed for a .22 caliber version that would have the same feel and balance as the .38. In addition, a lot of sportsmen thought that would be a good idea for field use as well.

In 1927, the Smith & Wesson factory began development of a revolver that would meet these perceived needs. The first batch was completed in January, 1931. The new handgun was introduced to the public and advertised as the K-22 Outdoorsman. The catalog, however, called it the K-22 Target revolver. In later years, collectors have referred to it as the K-22 First Model. It was built on the .38 M&P target frame, had a six-inch round barrel and a blue finish. It had a floating firing pin in the frame and a flat-faced hammer. A Patridge front sight was standard. The trigger pull was adjusted to be 3 to 4 pounds. The gun weighed 33 ounces. It was immediately popular, and competitive shooters soon discovered that its 50-yard groups could be as small as one and a half inches.

In December, 1939, with over 17,000 of the First Model having been produced, the factory began making an improved version. This new revolver was dubbed the K-22 Masterpiece, as S&W thought it was truly the best of all revolvers made to that time. Collectors today call it the Second Model. It sported a new micrometer rear sight and a shorter action with a faster lock time. Also incorporated was a carefully fitted and filed anti-backlash trigger. Patridge, plain or gold bead front sights were available. The first of these was completed and shipped in January, 1940. It sold for $40, which was a premium amount in those days. Unfortunately for target shooters and sportsmen, the Battle of Britain began overseas. Smith & Wesson then had to concentrate on shipping large numbers of .38/200 service revolvers to England. Only slightly more than 1,000 of the Second Model K-22s were produced. Their manufacture came to a halt in December, 1940.

When World War II concluded and S&W could again concentrate on the civilian market, production resumed on target revolvers. The first to be produced was the new K-22 in 1946. It was extensively re-designed, as were all the K-frame target models. These Third Models sported ribbed barrels, new micrometer-click rear sights, and a trigger overtravel block that could be quickly installed or removed right behind the trigger and adjusted quickly with a proper feeler gauge. A 1/10” or 1/8” Patridge front sight was standard. Prior to 1948, “Made in U.S.A.” was stamped on the right side of the frame. After that, a 4-line address was found there. This new series initially had K-prefix serial numbers beginning with K101. The postwar models all featured the new and safer automatic hammer block that was first used on the Victory Model .38s in 1944. With a ribbed 6” heavy barrel, introduced around 1950, it weighed 38 ounces.

At the request of competitive shooters, in 1949 the weights of the matching K-38 and K-32 revolvers were adjusted so that all had the same loaded weight. In December of 1949, the factory moved from its old quarters on Stockbridge Street and into a new factory on Roosevelt Avenue in Springfield, Massachusetts. K-22 manufacture then continued following an interruption of only 11 days for the equipment relocation. In 1955, the four-screw sideplate was eliminated and replaced by one using only 3 screws, with the earlier top screw replaced by a tongue on the plate that fit into the frame. In 1957, when the factory assigned numerical designations for each of its handguns, the K-22 Masterpiece became the Model 17. An 8 3/8” barrel was offered as an option beginning in 1958. As time went on, further changes would be indicated by a “dash number” following the model number. The Model 17-1 was a modification that changed the extractor rod from a right-hand thread to a left-hand thread. The “dash 2” model eliminated the screw in front of the trigger guard, and the “dash 3” model relocated the rear sight leaf screw. These dash numbers were authorized in 1959, 1961, and 1967 respectively, although implementation dates varied. The revolver illustrated is a Model 17-3, and was shipped in 1977. Checkered “magna” stocks that matched the contour of the grip frame were standard. However, this particular example is equipped by preference with optionally available factory smooth presentation target stocks.

Model 17s were virtually all blued, although a very few were nickeled. All have cylinders counterbored for the cartridge rims, and had pinned barrels until 1982. “Diamond pattern” checkered stocks were used until 1968. In 1990, with the Model 17-6, a full underlug barrel was introduced and became standard. The 8 3/8”-barreled version was dropped from production in 1993. The final Model 17-7 was discontinued in 1996 in favor of a 10-shot alloy cylinder version, the 17-8, which was made until late 1999. In 2001, a Heritage Series was produced, also stamped as the Model 17-8, but these had 6-shot cylinders and a new frame design. Metal injection molded (MIM) parts and side-mounted internal locks were used on these guns. A similar Heritage Series Model 18 (4” barrel) was also offered. The Model 617, a stainless version of the Model 17 with a full-underlug barrel, began production in 1989 and continues today with various barrel lengths and other modifications.

A lighter and handier spin-off of the Model 17 was the Model 18, which featured a tapered 4” barrel. It served as an excellent training vehicle for police and others who used 4” .38s and .357s. This was produced as the K-22 Combat Masterpiece from 1949 to 1985, and had similar engineering “dash” changes to the Model 17. The Model 18 was dropped from the line as the Model 17 became available with an optional 4” barrel.

In 1959, another variation based on the Model 17 was generated. This was the Model 48, the K-22 Masterpiece Magnum Rimfire. It was chambered for the .22 Winchester Rimfire Magnum, and was conceived as a field gun with longer reach and more power than the .22 Long Rifle guns. It continued in production until 1986, when it was replaced by the stainless Model 648. Changes during its manufacture paralleled those of the Model 17. Almost all were blued, although a very few were nickeled. Available barrel lengths were 4, 6 and 8 3/8”. Some were shipped from the factory with .22 LR interchangeable cylinders, making this combination quite versatile and valuable today.

Although no longer made, the Model 17 and its siblings, the Models 18 and 48, continue to be very popular revolvers, and are eagerly sought after. I’m fortunate enough to have a 6” Model 17 as well as one with an 8 3/8” barrel, together with a Model 18 and a Model 48. These are all exceptionally accurate handguns, and get extensive use as practice guns for their more powerful K-frame counterparts in .38 and .357. In the field, you could not ask for better small game revolvers. The K-22 Masterpieces were perhaps the finest .22 revolvers ever made. Today they have achieved definite classic status, and are well worth finding.

(c) 2012 JLM

Note - 9/10/2014: This piece is one of many in my new book 101 Classic Firearms. Quite a number of S&W firearms are featured there. It can be ordered here: http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/con..._John_Marshall
__________________
- Cogito, ergo armatum sum -

Last edited by PALADIN85020; 09-10-2014 at 12:10 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-10-2012, 04:23 PM
Engine49guy's Avatar
SWCA Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 3,924
Likes: 219
Liked 1,785 Times in 731 Posts
Default

Looks good but a few minor things ,
I believe that examples of the K22 "Heavy Masterpiece (which appeared in the 1950 circular ) did not ship until a few years later.

Also there was a brief overlap where both the 6" "Heavy Masterpiece" and tapered barrel Masterpiece were offered but ultimately the 6" tapered barrel version was discontinued but the tapered barrel style frame continued in the 4" (Combat) Masterpiece.

Also where it says:
"A 4” heavy-barreled Model 18 was produced for a while, beginning in 1986" is technically not correct.

The Model 18-4 was discontinued when S&W opted to produce the Model 17-5 and 17-6 in both 6" and 4" barrel lengths instead.

Also the 6 shot Model 18 and 17 were reintroduced in the new "Classic series" with IL and MIM parts and are instead based on a new style frame instead of the older "Heavy Masterpiece Model 17 frame.
In contrast both now have tapered barrels and Patridge Front sites.

Last edited by Engine49guy; 09-10-2012 at 04:28 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-10-2012, 04:27 PM
ma deuce's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Timonium, MD
Posts: 565
Likes: 25
Liked 188 Times in 125 Posts
Default

Don't you mean to say that in 1955, the 5-screw sideplate was eliminated and the 4-screw, without the top screw, was introduced? Then in 1958, or whenever it was, the trigger guard screw was eliminated, and the 3-screw guns introduced.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-10-2012, 04:50 PM
boykinlp's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 2,517
Likes: 549
Liked 903 Times in 326 Posts
Default

Thanks for the info.
__________________
Each one, teach one
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-10-2012, 05:07 PM
PALADIN85020's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Arizona
Posts: 5,071
Likes: 537
Liked 9,814 Times in 1,362 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ma deuce View Post
Don't you mean to say that in 1955, the 5-screw sideplate was eliminated and the 4-screw, without the top screw, was introduced? Then in 1958, or whenever it was, the trigger guard screw was eliminated, and the 3-screw guns introduced.
Nope. Early sideplates had 4 screws, later reduced to 3 screws and a top tongue.

The screw in in front of the trigger guard was a separate issue, and that was mentioned as well.

John
__________________
- Cogito, ergo armatum sum -
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-10-2012, 05:25 PM
PALADIN85020's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Arizona
Posts: 5,071
Likes: 537
Liked 9,814 Times in 1,362 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Engine49guy View Post
Looks good but a few minor things ,
I believe that examples of the K22 "Heavy Masterpiece (which appeared in the 1950 circular ) did not ship until a few years later.

Also there was a brief overlap where both the 6" "Heavy Masterpiece" and tapered barrel Masterpiece were offered but ultimately the 6" tapered barrel version was discontinued but the tapered barrel style frame continued in the 4" (Combat) Masterpiece.

Also where it says:
"A 4 heavy-barreled Model 18 was produced for a while, beginning in 1986" is technically not correct.

The Model 18-4 was discontinued when S&W opted to produce the Model 17-5 and 17-6 in both 6" and 4" barrel lengths instead.

Also the 6 shot Model 18 and 17 were reintroduced in the new "Classic series" with IL and MIM parts and are instead based on a new style frame instead of the older "Heavy Masterpiece Model 17 frame.
In contrast both now have tapered barrels and Patridge Front sites.
Good info. See corrections in the OP. Thanks!

John
__________________
- Cogito, ergo armatum sum -
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-10-2012, 05:26 PM
Bud Jr.'s Avatar
SWCA Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: SE USA
Posts: 921
Likes: 213
Liked 88 Times in 60 Posts
Default

A mention of the narrow ribbed guns might be productive, as collectors distinguish the difference along with the One Line Address guns. The Twelve Revolvers produced the only nickel full lug version.
I think you have done quite well. Maybe the gold bead on the first and the difference in the top between that and the second model. Maybe the different stocks on the revolver pictured...Just some thinking out loud.
__________________
Consider the world.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Likes This Post:
  #8  
Old 09-10-2012, 05:43 PM
PALADIN85020's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Arizona
Posts: 5,071
Likes: 537
Liked 9,814 Times in 1,362 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud Jr. View Post
A mention of the narrow ribbed guns might be productive, as collectors distinguish the difference along with the One Line Address guns. The Twelve Revolvers produced the only nickel full lug version.
I think you have done quite well. Maybe the gold bead on the first and the difference in the top between that and the second model. Maybe the different stocks on the revolver pictured...Just some thinking out loud.
Good points! However, space limitations for the article preclude getting into much esoterica, which while valid, make for a length overrun. I might mention that the smoothie grips on the gun mentioned were not original to the gun - just my personal preference. Thanks! I'll try to incorporate what I can.

John
__________________
- Cogito, ergo armatum sum -

Last edited by PALADIN85020; 09-10-2012 at 06:05 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-10-2012, 08:48 PM
GF's Avatar
GF GF is offline
SWCA Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Southern Indiana
Posts: 3,934
Likes: 1,303
Liked 1,990 Times in 624 Posts
Default

Look forward to seeing your article in the Blue Press, and as far as "... the smoothie grips ... just my personal preference."
In some cases - Mine Too!



Your photography is very well done too.

GF
Reply With Quote
The Following User Likes This Post:
  #10  
Old 09-10-2012, 09:08 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: dubuque ,iowa
Posts: 230
Likes: 1,719
Liked 41 Times in 31 Posts
Default

I look forward to getting that issue of the blue press so I can put it with all my other S&W books and catalogs . Knowledge to hold onto .
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 09-11-2012, 04:26 PM
Bud Jr.'s Avatar
SWCA Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: SE USA
Posts: 921
Likes: 213
Liked 88 Times in 60 Posts
Default

Please let me know when the article comes out if you think about it.
__________________
Consider the world.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 09-11-2012, 04:47 PM
ma deuce's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Timonium, MD
Posts: 565
Likes: 25
Liked 188 Times in 125 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PALADIN85020 View Post
Nope. Early sideplates had 4 screws, later reduced to 3 screws and a top tongue.

The screw in in front of the trigger guard was a separate issue, and that was mentioned as well.

John
Yeah, you're right. I was thinking 4-screw gun, not 4-screw sideplate. Sorry.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 09-11-2012, 05:24 PM
PALADIN85020's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Arizona
Posts: 5,071
Likes: 537
Liked 9,814 Times in 1,362 Posts
Default

Although the article won't permit more than one picture, I thought I'd post these just for giggles. The top one is of two 17s and an 18, and the bottom one is a 48.

John



__________________
- Cogito, ergo armatum sum -
Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Like Post:
  #14  
Old 09-12-2012, 12:21 PM
SWCA Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Kentucky, USA
Posts: 5,767
Likes: 942
Liked 2,459 Times in 983 Posts
Default

Its a nice article, well done. Those of us who consider ourselves K22 collectors can nit pick it to death, but to little gain. I do wonder where you got your production numbers for prewar guns. Roy always quoted it at 19,500, but we also know that one is high. there are messy instances where entire pages of K22s appeared but none have shipping dates logged. Those are the ones that result in "no information in company books" on factory letters.

While more Model 48s were produced than Jets, I wonder why the collector darlings weren't mentioned. Model 53 fans are absolutely crazy over their guns, but usually pan the 48 as a pretender. We (yes, I'm in the Jet crowd) usually write off the 48 as noisy and expensive to shoot. But we love the even noisier Jet cartridge with nearly unobtainable ammo.
__________________
Dick Burg
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 09-12-2012, 01:44 PM
PALADIN85020's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Arizona
Posts: 5,071
Likes: 537
Liked 9,814 Times in 1,362 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rburg View Post
Its a nice article, well done. Those of us who consider ourselves K22 collectors can nit pick it to death, but to little gain. I do wonder where you got your production numbers for prewar guns. Roy always quoted it at 19,500, but we also know that one is high. there are messy instances where entire pages of K22s appeared but none have shipping dates logged. Those are the ones that result in "no information in company books" on factory letters.

While more Model 48s were produced than Jets, I wonder why the collector darlings weren't mentioned. Model 53 fans are absolutely crazy over their guns, but usually pan the 48 as a pretender. We (yes, I'm in the Jet crowd) usually write off the 48 as noisy and expensive to shoot. But we love the even noisier Jet cartridge with nearly unobtainable ammo.
Thanks for the kind words, Dick. I tried to concentrate on the rimfire-only guns, space limitations being what they are. I have often looked at the Jets at gun shows, but the oddball caliber never seemed to make them worthwhile for me to purchase. The production figures come from Roy himself in the February, 1979 edition of "History of Smith & Wesson." As you say, the 19,500 figure is probably high given the reasons you cite.

Best regards,
John
__________________
- Cogito, ergo armatum sum -
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 09-12-2012, 02:59 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Maryland
Posts: 349
Likes: 0
Liked 34 Times in 21 Posts
Default

You might want to consider a sentence or two on how the Model 17 transitioned into the 617.
__________________
Tom
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 09-12-2012, 05:27 PM
getoff's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: south florida
Posts: 863
Likes: 389
Liked 161 Times in 90 Posts
Default

love mine!1105** ser #. any date help would be great. got this one from an older friend who i am sad to say, is terminal. wont ever let this one go. its in good, not great shape. a shooter as they would say. 6" bbl. and accurate all day long. this is the gun my little daughter will learn on. i will tell her many stories about Elly as she shoots. a little backround on Elly. 101st. Airborne, enlisted early, 17 years old. a fine jewish boy from Brooklyn NY. dropped in behind enemy lines on D-DAY, and couldn't wait to get some payback from the Nazi party. he will be gone soon, and i will miss him as much as my own Grandfather, if not more. any date help for history sake would be very cool. thanks to a great forum, and a great membership ahead of time.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 09-12-2012, 07:18 PM
PALADIN85020's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Arizona
Posts: 5,071
Likes: 537
Liked 9,814 Times in 1,362 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by getoff View Post
love mine!1105** ser #. any date help would be great. got this one from an older friend who i am sad to say, is terminal. wont ever let this one go. its in good, not great shape. a shooter as they would say. 6" bbl. and accurate all day long. this is the gun my little daughter will learn on. i will tell her many stories about Elly as she shoots. a little backround on Elly. 101st. Airborne, enlisted early, 17 years old. a fine jewish boy from Brooklyn NY. dropped in behind enemy lines on D-DAY, and couldn't wait to get some payback from the Nazi party. he will be gone soon, and i will miss him as much as my own Grandfather, if not more. any date help for history sake would be very cool. thanks to a great forum, and a great membership ahead of time.
The earliest serial number for a K-22 (1st model) is reported as being # 632132. The serial number you report does not make sense, as it is a much smaller number. You might want to check the number on your gun more closely. You might have missed a digit or two.

John
__________________
- Cogito, ergo armatum sum -
Reply With Quote
The Following User Likes This Post:
  #19  
Old 09-12-2012, 07:58 PM
getoff's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: south florida
Posts: 863
Likes: 389
Liked 161 Times in 90 Posts
Default

looks like a 17 with some other stuff near it. wish i had more to give now. will look for more info on the frame/yoke. thanks much for any info i can get.
Quote:
Originally Posted by PALADIN85020 View Post
The earliest serial number for a K-22 (1st model) is reported as being # 632132. The serial number you report does not make sense, as it is a much smaller number. You might want to check the number on your gun more closely. You might have missed a digit or two.

John
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 09-13-2012, 12:28 PM
Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Suburban Chicago
Posts: 2,940
Likes: 58
Liked 692 Times in 259 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by getoff View Post
looks like a 17 with some other stuff near it. wish i had more to give now. will look for more info on the frame/yoke. thanks much for any info i can get.
Look on the butt of the grip frame for the serial number. The numbers in the yoke area are usually assemblers or inspectors marks although later guns may have the serial there also. When you find the serial on the butt also include any letter prefix found there also.
__________________
John. SWCA #1586

Last edited by hsguy; 09-13-2012 at 12:30 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 09-22-2012, 04:40 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 77
Likes: 0
Liked 109 Times in 19 Posts
Default

I just looked at 2 smiths, both 8 3/8 bbl, one is a 17-4 22LR SN 89K92xx and the other a 48-4 22MRF 86K61XX.
Reading top post it talks up to a 17-3 and then in next paragraph goes to 17-7.
Where do the 17-4 and 48-4 come into play
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 09-22-2012, 05:07 PM
PALADIN85020's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Arizona
Posts: 5,071
Likes: 537
Liked 9,814 Times in 1,362 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Allen in MT View Post
I just looked at 2 smiths, both 8 3/8 bbl, one is a 17-4 22LR SN 89K92xx and the other a 48-4 22MRF 86K61XX.
Reading top post it talks up to a 17-3 and then in next paragraph goes to 17-7.
Where do the 17-4 and 48-4 come into play
The 17-4 moved the gas ring from the yoke to the cylinder. In 1982, with no dash change, the pinned barrel was eliminated.

Ditto with the Model 48-4.

John
__________________
- Cogito, ergo armatum sum -
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 09-22-2012, 09:00 PM
j38 j38 is offline
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: OR
Posts: 3,186
Likes: 1,881
Liked 320 Times in 129 Posts
Default

Fine job, John. Your efforts are appreciated!

Best Regards,

Jerry
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 09-22-2012, 09:15 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 77
Likes: 0
Liked 109 Times in 19 Posts
Default

Thanks for the response.
Just got home from going back to look again at the 2 smiths again. Needless to say I shot an offer and he accepted
Both of the guns are P&R 8 3/8. Now need to find DO
B. Had the pachmayr grips on both but also had the origional grips. Will get them situated to get a pic to post later.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 09-08-2014, 05:23 PM
ibewbull's Avatar
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Wisconsin Central State
Posts: 667
Likes: 2,296
Liked 411 Times in 208 Posts
Default

[IMG][/IMG]


K 416xxx I believe it is a DOB of 1960
If you can verify this I would appreciate it.
I hope the kids get me the book this Christmas
Some turn line no holster wear.
I hope I didn't pay too much.
$725 yesterday.
I was happy to find it and the old owner finds the box.
__________________
Bull from Wisconsin

Last edited by ibewbull; 09-08-2014 at 05:25 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 09-09-2014, 12:48 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Las Vegas Nevada
Posts: 13
Likes: 93
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Talking K22 Masterpiece

Recent and proud owner of near new 17-3, can't wait to shoot it! Thanks for the history lesson, now I like it more.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
S&W Revolvers: 1961 to 1980 Thread, The K-22 Masterpiece (Model 17): a brief history in Smith & Wesson Revolvers; This is a piece that's in progress for eventual publication in The Blue Press . I'd welcome constructive comments. Thanks! ...
LinkBacks (?)
LinkBack to this Thread: http://smith-wessonforum.com/s-w-revolvers-1961-1980/267766-k-22-masterpiece-model-17-brief-history.html
Posted By For Type Date
Pick Up Your Email by mail2web This thread Refback 01-07-2013 06:19 PM

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Model 60 (.38 spc) history? Brian894x4 S&W Revolvers: 1980 to the Present 11 06-11-2012 06:37 AM
History of the Model 10? RacingSnake S&W Revolvers: 1961 to 1980 14 03-18-2012 08:00 AM
Some history of the S&W model 10 HAWKEYE10 The Lounge 1 10-28-2009 11:29 PM
K-22 Pre-Model 17 Masterpiece or Pre-Model 18 Combat Masterpiece? PMRet S&W Hand Ejectors: 1896 to 1961 13 09-18-2009 11:49 PM
Want to know history of my Model 10-5 gearsource S&W Revolvers: 1961 to 1980 11 04-19-2009 11:23 AM

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
smith-wessonforum.com tested by Norton Internet Security smith-wessonforum.com tested by McAfee Internet Security

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:46 PM.


S-W Forum, LLC 2000-2015
Smith-WessonForum.com is not affiliated with Smith & Wesson Holding Corporation (NASDAQ Global Select: SWHC)