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S&W Revolvers: 1961 to 1980 3-Screw PINNED Barrel SWING-OUT Cylinder Hand Ejectors


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  #1  
Old 08-13-2009, 03:15 PM
skprice44 skprice44 is offline
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Default S&W Model 10

I just recently purchased my first revolver, a S&W Model 10. I am curious to its age though. The number inside the yoke is 8286. rhe S&W logo that is typically engraved on the right side of the gun, is on the left side and a little smaller than normal. Also, the extractor rod is does not have a shroud around it when the cylinder is locked into place. Anyone have any ideas?

Last edited by skprice44; 08-13-2009 at 03:21 PM.
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Old 08-13-2009, 03:33 PM
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What a great revolver to start with! Huge congratulations.

If you provide the s/n with "xx" as the last two digits, you'll enable us to provide an answer to your question.

The s/n is on the botton of the grip frame.
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Old 08-13-2009, 03:38 PM
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I looked under the grips, but all that is on the frame is JB4, but that is around the peg that holds the bottom of the grip. On the underside however, the number is 6277xx. This number is all over the gun; on the frame, on the backside of the grips, etc. I thought that this was just the machining #, but I could be wrong.
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Old 08-13-2009, 03:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skprice44 View Post
I just recently purchased my first revolver, a S&W Model 10. I am curious to its age though. The number inside the yoke is 8286. rhe S&W logo that is typically engraved on the right side of the gun, is on the left side and a little smaller than normal. Also, the extractor rod is does not have a shroud around it when the cylinder is locked into place. Anyone have any ideas?
According to my Smith and Wesson book the revolver would be around 1900. Now you also need to look on the bottom of the grips and see it you see the same number. If you have aftermarket grips you will need to take them off to see if you can locate the number. A picture would help too. If I am right this is a pre-10 or M&P 38 special hand ejector.

Hope this helps
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Old 08-13-2009, 03:44 PM
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Hi skprice44 and welcome to the Forum! Your question concerns one of the very best Smith & Wesson revolver models ever made.

The revisions of the Model 10 are marked on the inside of the frame at the front, visible when the cylinder is opened. For example my favorite Model 10 shows Mod. 10-6. The number we need to know in order to date it is on the butt at the bottom of the grip frame. Just curious but what barrel length does it feature and is is it the Heavy Barrel version or does it have a tapered barrel?
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Old 08-13-2009, 03:44 PM
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We love photos too.
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Old 08-13-2009, 03:46 PM
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Helps quite a bit. Everything on this gun is original. The number in the bottom of the gun match the numbers that are located everywhere else, including on the back side of the grips.
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Old 08-13-2009, 03:51 PM
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Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
Hi skprice44 and welcome to the Forum! Your question concerns one of the very best Smith & Wesson revolver models ever made.

The revisions of the Model 10 are marked on the inside of the frame at the front, visible when the cylinder is opened. For example my favorite Model 10 shows Mod. 10-6. The number we need to know in order to date it is on the butt at the bottom of the grip frame. Just curious but what barrel length does it feature and is is it the Heavy Barrel version or does it have a tapered barrel?
The barrel is 4 inches long and the barrel is tappered. I will post pics tomorrow. . . .maybe. . . .if I remember to take them.
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Old 08-13-2009, 03:54 PM
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Do you see a letter prefix in front of it? I have several Model 10s with serial numbers on the butts that read C XXXXXX or D XXXXXX. My guns span a time period from the early '50s to the mid '70s.

My first Smith & Wesson revolver was a circa 1971 Model 10 with the -6 revision which denotes the Heavy Barrel variation. It's serial number is D 3623670. The 4-inch Heavy Barrels are sho'nuff shooters but the tapered barrel models are better looking in my view.

Actually I can scarcely tell the difference in shooting the Heavy Barrel and the standard 4-inch tapered barrel.
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Old 08-13-2009, 03:57 PM
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Do you see a letter prefix in front of it? I have several Model 10s with serial numbers on the butts that read C XXXXXX or D XXXXXX. My guns span a time period from the early '50s to the mid '70s.

My first Smith & Wesson revolver was a circa 1971 Model 10 with the -6 revision which denotes the Heavy Barrel variation. It's serial number is D 3623670. The 4-inch Heavy Barrels are sho'nuff shooters but the tapered barrel models are better looking in my view.

Actually I can scarcely tell the difference in shooting the Heavy Barrel and the standard 4-inch tapered barrel.
No prefix, just the numbers.
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Old 08-13-2009, 04:16 PM
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Sounds pre-World War II then. Likely 1930s with a six-digit serial number of 6277XX. It was manufactured at least 20 years prior to the factory's assignment of the Model 10 designation to it's six-shot, fixed sight .38 Special revolver. Its an example of the famous and widely used "Military & Police" that did later become the Model 10.

For your future reference there's a topic category for "S&W Hand Ejectors: 1896 to 1961" which is just the place to inquire about your new revolver. Your revolver will receive more exposure there.

Sure hope to see photos of your new acquisition. Pretty neato that it still has its matching grips.
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Old 08-13-2009, 09:34 PM
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I just wonder what you guys are all talking about. We've finally gotten to the point where most answers given are pretty clear and usually correct. I find this thread to be a swerve off course.

Yes, its in the wrong forum, but that doesn't excuse the wild guesses we're seeing.

The gun appears to be a military and police (M&P) produced in the very late 1920s. Yes, its the forerunner of the later M10. The 627,000s serial number is the give away.
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Old 08-14-2009, 10:36 AM
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Attached is a picture of the revolver (if I did it right) . I was unsure as to which topic category to put it in as I was unsure of it age. Since it is a double action pistol, it could technically be considered a semi-automatic pistol. Thanks for all of the feed back. It has been a tremendous help!
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Old 06-25-2015, 05:45 PM
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I just found a 90% pre 10 with SN 5680xx. Can someone date and give approximate value? It's a blued 4 inch.
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Old 06-25-2015, 08:02 PM
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haha I doubt will it certainly be considered semi auto but nice try lol
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Old 06-25-2015, 08:04 PM
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that's a fine piece ya got there sir
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Old 06-25-2015, 09:05 PM
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19leben- Rather than tag onto a 6 year old threat, you should start your own. If it is a Military & Police with serial 5680xx it's likely from mid 1920s. For such an early gun in shooter condition I'd pay maybe $300. Somebody else would pay more. Somebody else would pay less. You "just found" it? Did you buy it or did you literally find it? If you bought it I think it's worth what you paid for it. But some guys don't understand what I mean by that so maybe I'm kooky.
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Old 10-14-2019, 07:30 PM
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i have a 6'' model 10 needing help with the year it was made please. c4946_ _ Thank you in advance
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Old 10-14-2019, 07:35 PM
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i have a 6'' model 10 needing help with the year it was made please. c4946_ _ Thank you in advance
Early 1960s, probably 1961. Helps to start a new thread with good pictures.
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Old 10-15-2019, 12:06 AM
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skprice44 the picture you have shown is a 5 or 6 inch barrel. From the grips and hammer it appears to be an old M&P the forerunner of the Model 10. BTW the barrel is measured from the front of the cylinder to the end of the barrel. Many new owners think the barrel is measured where it screws into the frame to the end. While you can't go too wrong with one please don't shoot +P ammo in it even though it will chamber it. The +P ammo can cause excessive wear of some of the internal parts. the steel used back when it was made isn't as strong as the steels used today.
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Old 10-15-2019, 01:58 AM
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Quote:
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skprice44 the picture you have shown is a 5 or 6 inch barrel. From the grips and hammer it appears to be an old M&P the forerunner of the Model 10. BTW the barrel is measured from the front of the cylinder to the end of the barrel. Many new owners think the barrel is measured where it screws into the frame to the end. While you can't go too wrong with one please don't shoot +P ammo in it even though it will chamber it. The +P ammo can cause excessive wear of some of the internal parts. the steel used back when it was made isn't as strong as the steels used today.
IMO shooting +P ammo is not a problem as long as the gun is in well maintained and in good condition. Mid 19th century standard .38 special cartridges were loaded to much higher pressures than today's standard loads. However, one should not use +Ps excessively in older guns.
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Old 10-15-2019, 11:57 AM
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IMO shooting +P ammo is not a problem as long as the gun is in well maintained and in good condition. Mid 19th century standard .38 special cartridges were loaded to much higher pressures than today's standard loads. However, one should not use +Ps excessively in older guns.
I think this oft-repeated Internet statement is incorrect. The power didn't change. But the means of recording velocity did, making the newer ammo seem less potent. But it was really just a matter of publishing more accurate velocity figures.
Old figures were taken from long pressure barrels without a gap.

The current system uses four-inch barrels and they have a gap (vent) like that between barrel and cylinder on real revolvers.

If you have a good modern chronograph, try firing some ammo made from the 1920's-1950s and some modern loads.

Firing much Plus P ammo in old guns made of softer steel may result in aggravated progress of cylinder endshake.

The OP's theory that having a DA revolver means that he has a semi-auto pistol is too unfounded to
address. I hope he was joking. He seems to be BADLY in need of some basic gun books

Last edited by Texas Star; 10-15-2019 at 12:11 PM.
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627, ejector, engraved, extractor, hand ejector, military, model 1, model 10, pre-10, s&w, shroud, smith and wesson

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