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Old 11-10-2010, 09:51 AM
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Default Cleaning 686

I watched Youtube videos on cleaning revolvers and they tend to leave cylinder in gun. I've found it easier to take out the cylinder to clean, while there was Locktite on the yoke screw originally I don't put any on? since I clean allot, never seems loose, any problem with this? I shoot about 100 rounds week through 686 mix .38 and .357. I clean after every session. Any good method for getting the .38 carbon rings out. Seems like a allot of work. I use hoppes #9 and Kroil to clean.
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Old 11-10-2010, 10:14 AM
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i have used a brass brush and my elec. drill at times to remove the ring, just go slow.
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Old 11-10-2010, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mboyda View Post
I watched Youtube videos on cleaning revolvers and they tend to leave cylinder in gun. I've found it easier to take out the cylinder to clean, while there was Locktite on the yoke screw originally I don't put any on?
You probably don't need it.

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Originally Posted by mboyda View Post
I clean after every session. Any good method for getting the .38 carbon rings out. Seems like a allot of work. I use hoppes #9 and Kroil to clean.
The burn rings inside the cylinder are a bugger to get out. Here's the best way I have found after about 25 years:

Use a.40 nylon bore brush on a short rod in a hand drill. Dip the brush in chrome polish and spin it inside the tubes. If really stubborn, I cut a strip of scotchbrite pad and spiral wrap it onto the brush then spin that in the tubes. You can get the tube clean in under a minute that way.

I don't use metal brushes any more. They are abrasive and the bristles break off and end up in the gun. Nylon last a lot longer.
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Old 11-10-2010, 05:37 PM
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Do you use the drill at every cleaning or just once in awhile? Does it cause allot or wear?
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Old 11-10-2010, 09:02 PM
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There is a product by Cylinder & Slide called de-leading wool. It is softer than bluing and harder than lead. Cleans the lead from the barrel and the carbon from the chambers. Wrap a few strands around a bronze brush and scrub out. Only takes a few passes and no drill needed. A packet will last several years.
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Old 11-10-2010, 09:05 PM
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Default necessary to clean the ring out?

What if you never shoot magnum rounds, only 38 specials, any need to worry about getting rid of the ring in the chambers?
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Old 11-10-2010, 09:29 PM
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Do you use the drill at every cleaning or just once in awhile? Does it cause allot or wear?
I use it about every 250 rounds or so. You really don't want to let those hard carbon rings build up too much.

Using a nylon bore brush with chrome polish or scotchbrite has very low abrasion and will not wear the steel. It does polish the inside of the tube which makes it easier to clean (the carbon can't stick as well).

Last edited by bountyhunter; 11-10-2010 at 09:32 PM.
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Old 11-10-2010, 09:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Ed333 View Post
What if you never shoot magnum rounds, only 38 specials, any need to worry about getting rid of the ring in the chambers?
The rings are actually worse with .38 ammo because it is short and the burns are farther back in the tube.
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Old 11-10-2010, 10:04 PM
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An aside, I have found that using 'Nev'r Dull', a car wheel cleaner, works really well for removing the carbon built up on the outside of the cylinder. Not necessarily the lead/carbon at the face of the cylinder bores, but the part with the flutes.

I use it to clean the rest of the revolver too. (NOT blued guns though.)

I also remove my cylinder to clean better.
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