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Old 05-11-2011, 03:38 AM
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Default Should I Send This Pistol To S&W For Warranty Repair?

I just purchased this new revolver, S&W 637 Power Port Pro Series. I've typed a few notes on the photo.

Basically, when I point the barrel downward while opening or closing the cylinder, the edge of the cylinder doesn't bind up where the silver line/groove is located.

When I have the barrel point upward and either close or open the cylinder, the cylinder's edge binds (overlaps) where the silver line/groove is located, and the cylinder becomes difficult to close.

Please advise. Thanks in advance.

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Old 05-11-2011, 06:51 AM
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The solution to your "problem" is to not point the barrel up when closing the cylinder. Since the barrel of the revolver must be pointing down to reload it, this shouldn't be a hardship.

The frame extension (called the frame stud) where you have the "silver line" is there to keep the cylinder from falling off the frame. If you keep the barrel pointing downward while you open and close the cylinder, you shouldn't see any further wear there.
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Last edited by XTrooper; 05-11-2011 at 09:02 AM.
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Old 05-11-2011, 06:58 AM
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Have you done any work to it since you bought it? I see where you were talking about having some trigger work done a few days ago..
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Old 05-11-2011, 07:08 AM
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I have the standard model 637 and even pointing it straight up while closing cylinder I would have to force it to rub the frame that hard. I would send it in. If they think you have done something previous that lead to this then they will say as much.
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Old 05-11-2011, 07:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maximumbob54 View Post
I have the standard model 637 and even pointing it straight up while closing cylinder I would have to force it to rub the frame that hard. I would send it in. If they think you have done something previous that lead to this then they will say as much.
Are you saying that with your revolver's barrel pointing up, the cylinder will rub the frame stud only if you use force to create contact? The reason I ask is because it is perfectly normal for a revolver's cylinder to contact the frame stud when the barrel is pointing up simply from the force of gravity.

Opening and closing the cylinder while it is contacting the frame stud WILL cause wear and it doesn't take any added force for it to occur. It's steel against steel.
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:02 AM
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Sometimes the rim of the cartridge on a non recessed cylinder will touch the stud when attempting to open or close the cylinder, and it will bind. The technique is to allow the cylinder to rotate as you are opening it or closing it, allowing the rim of cartridge to get out of the way.
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrChubbs View Post
Should I Send This Pistol To S&W For Warranty Repair?
No.

Quote:
Originally Posted by XTrooper View Post
Are you saying that with your revolver's barrel pointing up, the cylinder will rub the frame stud only if you use force to create contact? The reason I ask is because it is perfectly normal for a revolver's cylinder to contact the frame stud when the barrel is pointing up simply from the force of gravity.

Opening and closing the cylinder while it is contacting the frame stud WILL cause wear and it doesn't take any added force for it to occur. It's steel against steel.

Agreed, there's nothing wrong with the gun. Those marks can be minimized with careful handling. Keeping it pointed down is good. If the fired cases stick at all, you're driving the cylinder against the stud unless you support it during ejection. You can also cause those marks while cleaning the cylinder with a patch or brush, which is one reason I remove the cylinder to clean it.
In the case of a 637, it's worse than "steel on steel". It's steel on an aluminum alloy frame.
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Last edited by s&wchad; 05-11-2011 at 09:24 AM.
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XTrooper View Post
Are you saying that with your revolver's barrel pointing up, the cylinder will rub the frame stud only if you use force to create contact? The reason I ask is because it is perfectly normal for a revolver's cylinder to contact the frame stud when the barrel is pointing up simply from the force of gravity.

Opening and closing the cylinder while it is contacting the frame stud WILL cause wear and it doesn't take any added force for it to occur. It's steel against steel.
Poor wording on my part. "Rub it" yes, "Rub it so hard it rubs off the finish..." heck no. That is my point I failed to make. I'm not talking about the mark on the plate from the cylinder pin, I mean the part that stops the cylinder from falling out when it is open. And the cylinder should be steel on the 637 versus the aluminum frame.
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:31 AM
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Those marks mean the frame stud is doing its job (to keep the cylinder from falling off). Don't worry about it. If it is a comsmetic issue, a quick touch up with a black marker will fix it.
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Old 05-11-2011, 11:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maximumbob54 View Post
And the cylinder should be steel on the 637 versus the aluminum frame.
All the more reason why it will cause wear. Pit the 637's steel cylinder against its aluminum alloy frame stud and the stud loses every time.
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Old 05-11-2011, 01:32 PM
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I am refering to the OP's bottom most arrow in his picture. The clear coat on my 637 has not worn off in that location the way his is now bare aluminum. Unless he is smacking the heck out of his extractor and making the cylinder impact the frame that hard I guess...
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Old 05-13-2011, 01:54 AM
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Hello Everyone,

After sending Photos to S&W warranty department, having my FFL dealer and a local S&W inspect the revolver, it was classified as a defective revolver.

According the all who reviewed the photos and physically inspected the revolver, it wasn't "machined properly" and "there's an abnormal gap between the cylinder and barrel" and finally "the cylinder binds against the frame to point of not being able to close." I received sincere apologies. My FFL warrants his firearms through Davidson Warranty. A replacement revolver is in the mail, even today. I was at the FFL's office today signing paperwork and soon should have a new properly functional pistol in hand.

My new baby

Last edited by MrChubbs; 05-13-2011 at 01:59 AM.
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Old 05-13-2011, 08:40 AM
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Wear on that cast-in-place cylinder stop will be common - and easily noticed due to the contrast of the then-bare aluminum color against the darker finish. Some folks reported shearing off the stop completely, some years back, on the similar but larger L-frame 296, like mine, after a few 'Hollywood' raps of the ejector rod. It's cylinder is titanium - but SS will do the same thing. As it's function is to halt the cylinder from falling out of the gun when released and muzzle up, no stop can result in the emptying cylinder landing, at best, in your hand! Worst case - it hits the ground. Care - and the proper use of gravity - will assure you of a long life together.

Stainz
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Old 05-13-2011, 09:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XTrooper View Post
The solution to your "problem" is to not point the barrel up when closing the cylinder. Since the barrel of the revolver must be pointing down to reload it, this shouldn't be a hardship.

The frame extension (called the frame stud) where you have the "silver line" is there to keep the cylinder from falling off the frame. If you keep the barrel pointing downward while you open and close the cylinder, you shouldn't see any further wear there.
DITTO what XTRooper said !
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Old 05-13-2011, 09:54 AM
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Glad to hear they took care of ya.
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637, cartridge, ejector, extractor, recessed, s&w, sig arms, titanium

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S&W Revolvers: 1980 to the Present Thread, Should I Send This Pistol To S&W For Warranty Repair? in Smith & Wesson Revolvers; I just purchased this new revolver, S&W 637 Power Port Pro Series. I've typed a few notes on the photo. ...
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