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Old 12-08-2012, 03:08 PM
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Would polishing a 629-1 hurt its value. Or should I just leave it alone thanks
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Old 12-08-2012, 04:19 PM
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I would leave it. I have a polished 627 and it is too "blinggy"....To my if looks are important, I like the classic looks of the gun over the shinny look. As far as value of a pre-lock 629, again, I would pay more for the original finish. But that is me. My 627 is on its way to a new home (maybe).
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Old 12-08-2012, 05:37 PM
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It's personal preference whether you polish ss guns or not. I like it. It doesn't hurt the value, so don't sweat it.
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Old 12-08-2012, 05:43 PM
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I like them original. To each - his own
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Old 12-08-2012, 05:44 PM
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I polished my 686 with Mothers, and added maple grips. Looks great ( it's the one on my avatar).
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:03 PM
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I like the look of polished guns, and I do not believe that a nice polish job hurts the value; it might increase the value a little bit.
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:14 PM
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I would treat a polished gun that was not done at the factory the same way I would a shooter grade anything. I count it, and porting as two huge negatives. That is just personal preference though, and it is obviously different for others
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:32 PM
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My opinion is that an original finish is ALWAYS worth more than one that has been modified.

I understand the reasons owners polish their guns, but most buyers want originality.

Polishing guns taints originality and therefore affects resale value.

Additionally, whether it is the case or not, buyers often suspect a polish job was done to cover or diminish scratches or other signs of use/abuse.

Not trying to get in a fight here, just posing my opinion, which happens to be shared by all of my gun collecting friends.
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:44 PM
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If you do polish it can you return it to stock?
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Old 12-08-2012, 08:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ben1989 View Post
If you do polish it can you return it to stock?
scotch bright pads will give it the satin finish again.
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Old 12-09-2012, 12:40 PM
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Originally Posted by rbmac52 View Post
My opinion is that an original finish is ALWAYS worth more than one that has been modified.

I understand the reasons owners polish their guns, but most buyers want originality.
Polishing guns taints originality and therefore affects resale value. Your opinion, not fact.

Additionally, whether it is the case or not, buyers often(often? really?) suspect a polish job was done to cover or diminish scratches or other signs of use/abuse.
Not trying to get in a fight here, just posing my opinion, which happens to be shared by all of my gun collecting friends.
I can honestly say, out of the hundreds..literally HUNDREDS of shooters I've encountered at the range in the years of shooting and bringing my polished ss revolvers, NOT ONE has EVER expressed your view as polishing diminishes value, and NONE ever said they didn't like it. I'm sure there are some out there that don't like polished, but to say "most buyers want originality" is pure bs and speculation to support your view. Same can be said about the statement saying polishing was done to cover up use/abuse, pure bs.
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Old 12-09-2012, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Quakertown View Post
I can honestly say, out of the hundreds..literally HUNDREDS of shooters I've encountered at the range in the years of shooting and bringing my polished ss revolvers, NOT ONE has EVER expressed your view as polishing diminishes value, and NONE ever said they didn't like it. I'm sure there are some out there that don't like polished, but to say "most buyers want originality" is pure bs and speculation to support your view. Same can be said about the statement saying polishing was done to cover up use/abuse, pure bs.
People admirer shiny things, our eyes are drawn to them, much like red cars. But a 629-1 is not a new production piece. I would agree that most people who would be willing to shell out top dollar for one in the box would not be as willing to pay that amount if the finish was altered. It's not disrespecting what anyone chooses to do with their own firearm, it's just a statement of truth. Just as there are people who will pay top dollar for a gold plated Desert Eagle there are some who would be as likely, or more to go after the polished model, but I believe from what I have seen that market is considerably smaller than the one who prefer factory configuration.

Opinions are nothing to get upset about, w all have them
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Old 12-09-2012, 12:54 PM
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I like Stainless guns, and the nice thing about them is that if they are a little (or a lot) rough, you can make them look nice. It's not always necessary to make them shine like a mirror, but just enough to clean them up nice. That's how I like mine.
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Old 12-09-2012, 12:57 PM
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The owner of the LGS has a "display only" case where he shows items from his collection and where I show off a few S&W revolvers from time to time.
Recently, my 8-3/8" no-dash 629 was on display.
The gun was well used when I got it, I did the full polish.
He said that revolver caused more buzz than anything he's ever displayed and that there were many offers to buy it.

That said, I'll always leave a nice gun in the original satin finish.
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Old 12-09-2012, 12:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaosrob View Post
People admirer shiny things, our eyes are drawn to them, much like red cars. But a 629-1 is not a new production piece. I would agree that most people who would be willing to shell out top dollar for one in the box would not be as willing to pay that amount if the finish was altered. It's not disrespecting what anyone chooses to do with their own firearm, it's just a statement of truth. Just as there are people who will pay top dollar for a gold plated Desert Eagle there are some who would be as likely, or more to go after the polished model, but I believe from what I have seen that market is considerably smaller than the one who prefer factory configuration.

Opinions are nothing to get upset about, w all have them
The percentage of ppl buying a NIB, unfired 629-1 is so small it's almost undetectable. So, yes, the ppl who are looking for that incredibly small percentage of available unfired NIB ones would only pay top TOP dollar for an unaltered one. Other than that, it doesn't affect value at all. I am on gunbroker daily, and have been for many years. If anything other than the stated unfired models, the shiney ones are actually sold for MORE. It shows the owner actually treated his weapon with care, as opposed to abusing it and not cleaning it. That statement about polishing is done to cover up abuse/use is pure bs. It's done to give the appearance of polished nickle, drawing the eyes to something shiney, that's all.
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Old 12-09-2012, 01:11 PM
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Opinions were asked, opinions were offered, they can be taken for exactly what they are. I have no desire for it to turn argumentative, or defensive posturing so it can just be taken at face value. If you are happy with your decision, regardless of what you do, than it was the correct one!

Merry Christmas to everyone.
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Old 12-09-2012, 01:30 PM
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I have a Mod 60 I have been polishing, it is well used. I do not particularly like high polish on larger frame guns, but do like it on smaller, more personal guns. Since we are speaking about "shooting" guns, not "collectable" guns, I do not believe polishing hurts resale value, and as some have mentioned above it may enhance the value. In taste, I see no difference between high polish stainless and high shined Nickle finish, I like small guns in nickle, but not large ones.
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Old 12-09-2012, 01:32 PM
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Dunno about the value but I'd prefer a non-polished if I were looking to buy.
Why are you wanting to polish it, to remove or hide imperfections, etc, too much time on your hands or just prefer the look?
If I were trying to remove or cover finish flaws, I may go with a dull finish like a light bead blast, etc. but if it's a carry/working gun,
I'd leave it alone. It's all a personal thing, go with what you want.

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Old 12-09-2012, 01:36 PM
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What are you "polishers" using ?? I use either Mothers Mag or Flitz. I polish all my stainless revolvers, add custom grips and love the custom look.
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Old 12-09-2012, 07:15 PM
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I use the Flitz polish and a microfiber cloth. I prefer the paste to the liquid; it is easier to work with. When the cloth gets dirty, I throw it away and use a new one.

I mainly polish guns because I like the look. When I am finished, it feels more like "My Gun" than before polishing, because I have some "skin in the game," some time expended polishing the gun, and pride of workmanship. It is a pleasant and productive way to pass time while watching tv at night. Nicks, scratches and milky areas can all be polished out, and a high shine added.

It is easy to convert an unloved, ugly, inexpensive hazy or milky nickel plated or stainless steel gun into a much-desired piece, simply by polishing, but it does take some time. People offer to buy my polished nickel plated guns, even though they would never have considered making an offer on the gun before polishing. Once, I bought a hazy nickel plated Colt Detective Special. It shoots great! A friend told me it was an ugly piece of junk. Then I polished it. It still shoots great! That same friend repeatedly begged to purchase the revolver, stating that it is beautiful and knowing that I polished the DS. I still own that beautiful, shiny DS, built in my birth year, 1952.
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Old 12-09-2012, 07:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jack the toad View Post
Dunno about the value but I'd prefer a non-polished if I were looking to buy.
Why are you wanting to polish it, to remove or hide imperfections, etc, too much time on your hands or just prefer the look?
If I were trying to remove or cover finish flaws, I may go with a dull finish like a light bead blast, etc. but if it's a carry/working gun,
I'd leave it alone. It's all a personal thing, go with what you want.
Let me put this back to you in reverse.
I don't know about the value, but I prefer polished if I was looking to buy.
Why don't you want to polish it, to show scratches and nicks, too lazy to put the effort into it, or just prefer dull finish?
If I were trying to remove or cover finish flaws, I would do the polishing, and if it's a carry/working gun I'd still polish. It's personal preference, go with what you want.
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Old 12-09-2012, 08:13 PM
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I was looking for an early Mountain Gun for quite a while and I finally found one that some nimrod with a lot of time on his hands and not a lot of talent had polished. The Mt. Gun was the one with the logos, caliber markings etc. etched instead of stamped and were mostly non existant as they had been polished off. I needed a shooter anyway but I couldn't get used it. Finally sold it......Dan
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:00 PM
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I love the full polished look. I find them easier to clean and residue wipes right off. The SS looks cleaner. I have polished some and not others. The polished ones get more of the "wow" factor.
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:21 PM
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Quote:
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It's personal preference, go with what you want.
Absolutely
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:22 PM
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Unless it's a new in the box and you never plan on shooting it so that the collector value stays in tack then you shouldn't mess with the finish. If you shoot it a lot it will get rub and wear marks from shooting and handling and they are easy to polish out. After the first polish job they are easy to maintain with a little elbow grease and the revolver looks new all be it shiny. My favorites S&W revolvers are cleaned and polished nickel revolvers so shiny doesn't bother me.

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Old 12-10-2012, 12:13 AM
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No dash 629's were manufactured in a low polished state. Those were the days.
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