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  #1  
Old 08-20-2009, 08:32 PM
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Default S&W Revolvers for Lefties

Did S&W make firearms for lefties? I am one and I would like to know if it is all in the grips or is the safety on the opposite side of a righty to engage or disengage it? Will the cost of the firearm be more or less money should I find one?
If there is one for sale out there, I would be interesed in a 357/38 special revolver Used but in Good condition, I have no problem with looks and min. wear, not a collector but a User.
Joe.
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Old 08-20-2009, 08:45 PM
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I have never seen one, but you never say never with S&W. You need to watch the timing close when you shoot left hand. What is in time for the right hand won't be for the left some times.
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Old 08-20-2009, 08:46 PM
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To my knowledge, S&W never made a revolver for a left-hander. There is no safety on a S&W revolver. In order to make it left handed, the cylinder release would have to be moved to the right side, and the crane opening relocated, and the side plate moved to the left side. The engineering and manufacturing costs would far exceed any sales S&W could expect. I do believe there is a manufacturer that has made a left-handed 1911 .45 ACP. I can not recall who that company was.
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Old 08-20-2009, 08:47 PM
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I'm a lefty. I've been shooting S&W revolvers for close to 30 years. I can shoot and speedload a revolver with no problems. My son is right handed and handles a revolver well. He's alot younger than me, and I can speedload as fast as he can. You have just got to figure out what reloading/speedloading technique works best for you.
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Old 08-20-2009, 10:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H Richard View Post
To my knowledge, S&W never made a revolver for a left-hander. There is no safety on a S&W revolver. In order to make it left handed, the cylinder release would have to be moved to the right side, and the crane opening relocated, and the side plate moved to the left side. The engineering and manufacturing costs would far exceed any sales S&W could expect. I do believe there is a manufacturer that has made a left-handed 1911 .45 ACP. I can not recall who that company was.
The company's name was Randall, The 1911 in question was called "The Port Sider".
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Old 08-20-2009, 10:17 PM
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Along the lines of the OP's question, the Colt SAA is a left handed gun. Colt was a lefty, and designed the SAA to suit him. A right handed SAA would have the loading gate on the left side to allow loading and unloading with the weak hand, also the ejector rod would have been on the left side of the barrel.
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Old 08-20-2009, 11:51 PM
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What Magnum 7 said. I also have been shooting S&W revolvers for close to 40 years. I carried one for many years as an officer before switching to a 1911. I still carry one almost every day. I got so I could speed load a revolver faster then many right handers. As he said, figure out a method and practice a lot. Charter Arms makes a true left handed revolver. Everything is reversed on it. I have handled one and think that it feels strange to me after manipulating a right handed revolver all my life.

Tom
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Old 08-21-2009, 12:21 AM
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Actually I think that a case can be made that all S&W revolvers are lefthanded. I realize that the latch is positioned for the right thumb......but the cylinder opens to the left. Practice will make for decent weakhand loading for we righthanders BUT how many times have you seen the righthander move the open revolver to his/her left hand and use his strong hand for loading? A lefty can transfer the revolver to his righthand ,thumb the latch, eject and reload with his strong hand and switch back at least as readily as a righthander.
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Old 08-21-2009, 12:47 AM
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I agree with Treeman,I have shot left handed all my life using speedloaders in K frame guns and it has always been an advantage to favor your left hand.Even shot a 300 on the combat course a few times.Remember leftys are always in their right minds.
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  #10  
Old 08-21-2009, 12:19 PM
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Dave Lauck produces left-hand S & W revolver conversions (Custom Revolvers - 1st thumbnail 1st row). He is a true master craftsman - his work is exceptional - but it will cost you.

The competition left-handed revolver pictured costs $2,750+. A complete personal defense/close-quarters battle (CQB) package costs $2,200. He quotes the following on his site under "Guns Currently Available": Custom S&W model 625 SS .45 ACP revolver $1850 - as he explains this is a forfeited project that reflects a deduction of the initial deposit paid - even with the deduction it is still expensive.

Except for the last item above I'm almost positive that the prices DO NOT include the cost of the base revolver! Like I said his work ain't cheap! However, I've never heard anyone complain - about anything.
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  #11  
Old 08-21-2009, 12:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revolver_Fan View Post
Dave Lauck produces left-hand S & W revolver conversions (Custom Revolvers - 1st thumbnail 1st row). He is a true master craftsman - his work is exceptional - but it will cost you.
uh...does he also make left-handed ammunition, too? Or maybe he got Cor-Bon to print their boxes with mirror images...




Oh, there was an April Fool's joke ad that said the S&W finally started producing left-handed revolvers, with the cylinder release on the right side, and the cylinder opening on the right side...I can't find it now, but it was funny (yes, they took images of S&W revolvers and mirrored them).

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Old 08-21-2009, 03:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tjtoolbox View Post
Did S&W make firearms for lefties? I am one and I would like to know if it is all in the grips or is the safety on the opposite side of a righty to engage or disengage it? Will the cost of the firearm be more or less money should I find one?
If there is one for sale out there, I would be interesed in a 357/38 special revolver Used but in Good condition, I have no problem with looks and min. wear, not a collector but a User.
Joe.
tjtoolbox - what problems are you having with your revolver? Maybe we can talk you through it as lefties to a lefty.
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  #13  
Old 08-21-2009, 04:26 PM
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Actually, it is a misnomer that "there is no safety on a revolver." The modern S&W has built-in safeties, but there is no "switch" on a modern S&W.

The lock on the side of the frame does not count as a safety, nor should it ever be used as one!

However, S&W did make at least one run of revolvers with a manual safety for the French, of all people, and these guns are very scarce.

The safety was on the right side of that particular revolver- it looked almost like the cylinder release and operated similarly. It just locked up the action when moved into position. However, why they wanted said modification is beyond my powers of comprehension!
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Old 08-21-2009, 04:46 PM
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I am a lefty and I just found what works best for me.The Righty revolver works just fine for me so I will keep with it......Mike
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Old 08-21-2009, 05:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gun 4 Fun View Post
Along the lines of the OP's question, the Colt SAA is a left handed gun. Colt was a lefty, and designed the SAA to suit him. A right handed SAA would have the loading gate on the left side to allow loading and unloading with the weak hand, also the ejector rod would have been on the left side of the barrel.
Samuel Colt passed away in 1862, at least ten years before the Model P was designed and produced.

However, there's always been speculation that the Model P was designed for south paws. Being that lefties only make up 5% of the population (and I'm one), it seems unlikely that the design would have been done that way.
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  #16  
Old 08-21-2009, 05:15 PM
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Ruger was a lefty also. I believe it is easier to flip the loading gate open with my right thumb & load with my left hand just like I do with my DA's Smiths; that's why I bought these:

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Old 08-21-2009, 06:32 PM
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The model P was influenced by Colt's earlier designs, even though he was gone when it came into production. The gun was definately a left handed design. The guns were designed to be used by horse mounted soldiers, and if a soldier was bouncing along on his horse, he certainly didn't want to have to switch the gun from his strong hand to his weak to unload, then reload, then switch back.

Since most people are right handed, a right handed gun would have had the loading gate on the left, which would keep the gun in the strong hand while loading with the weak, or off hand.
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Old 08-21-2009, 07:05 PM
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I doubt that is a left hand gun, notice the rear sight is fully reversed as well as the letters on the ammo box. Someone flipped the print around.
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Old 08-21-2009, 07:10 PM
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I'm a leftie and find a true left handed gun more difficult to use. Probably from years of using standard ones but I also think that left handed people are a little bit more ambidextrious than those that are right handed.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...n/Renegade.jpg
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Old 08-21-2009, 07:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joni_Lynn View Post
I doubt that is a left hand gun, notice the rear sight is fully reversed as well as the letters on the ammo box. Someone flipped the print around.
+1 That is a mirror image.
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  #21  
Old 08-21-2009, 07:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Gun 4 Fun View Post
The model P was influenced by Colt's earlier designs, even though he was gone when it came into production. The gun was definately a left handed design. The guns were designed to be used by horse mounted soldiers, and if a soldier was bouncing along on his horse, he certainly didn't want to have to switch the gun from his strong hand to his weak to unload, then reload, then switch back.

Since most people are right handed, a right handed gun would have had the loading gate on the left, which would keep the gun in the strong hand while loading with the weak, or off hand.
The 1860 Army revolver had a cut on the right side to accommodate recapping the revolver. Since most shooters are right-handed, the cut on the right side of the frame was made so the right hand could load the cap onto the nipple. The revolver would be held in the left hand, and the stronger right hand would be used to load the cylinder and charge the nipple. The cylinder rotated clockwise, and a spent cap would more likely fall off and away after the discharge. There was less likelihood of a spent cap jamming the cylinder.

Since the cut for the nipple was on the right side, it was a much smaller design and engineering design task, to put a loading gate there. Manipulating the loading gate and ejector rod is a function for the right hander, holding the revolver in the left hand to complete the task.
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Old 08-21-2009, 07:51 PM
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The 1860 was indeed a cap and ball design. It makes sense that the nipple relief would be on the right side. The gun could remain in the stronghand while decapping/capping.

Tha model P was a huge military contract for Colt. The minor design cganges that you mention wouldn't have been an issue. If not for the military contract, the model P most likely wouldn't have come into existance.

You may not want to accept the fact that the SAA is a left handed gun, but it is a historical fact.
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Old 08-22-2009, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Gun 4 Fun View Post
The 1860 was indeed a cap and ball design. It makes sense that the nipple relief would be on the right side. The gun could remain in the stronghand while decapping/capping.

Tha model P was a huge military contract for Colt. The minor design cganges that you mention wouldn't have been an issue. If not for the military contract, the model P most likely wouldn't have come into existance.

You may not want to accept the fact that the SAA is a left handed gun, but it is a historical fact.
Sorry, but until someone offers some empirical proof, then the legend that the SAA is a left-handed gun belongs to the stories of urban mythology.

Samuel Colt was a genius at marketing, and left handers represented (and still do) only about five percent of the population. It is inconceivable that the SAA would have been designed for lefties.

As to the cavalryman shooting left handed and wielding the saber in the right, it's virtually impossible to do both, and still control the horse. It's also very difficult, if not impossible to cross over with the left hand, and draw from a right handed flap holster, which was standard issue.
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Old 08-22-2009, 09:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Joni_Lynn View Post
I doubt that is a left hand gun, notice the rear sight is fully reversed as well as the letters on the ammo box. Someone flipped the print around.
Good catch, Joni Lynn!
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Old 08-22-2009, 10:05 PM
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As to the cavalryman shooting left handed and wielding the saber in the right, it's virtually impossible to do both, and still control the horse. It's also very difficult, if not impossible to cross over with the left hand, and draw from a right handed flap holster, which was standard issue.
I thought the idea was to be able to transfer the gun to the left hand to reload whith the (right) saber hand?
I have nothing to support that, just what I was told...
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Old 08-22-2009, 10:39 PM
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I thought the idea was to be able to transfer the gun to the left hand to reload whith the (right) saber hand?
I have nothing to support that, just what I was told...
A cavalry rider holds the reins in his left hand. The pistol is transferred to the left hand (while still holding the reins) and the loading is done with the right hand.

This is all very natural to someone used to riding horses. In a situation where you need to reload a pistol while mounted, the last thing I would do is let go of the brakes.
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Old 08-23-2009, 02:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Dennis The B View Post
Sorry, but until someone offers some empirical proof, then the legend that the SAA is a left-handed gun belongs to the stories of urban mythology.

Samuel Colt was a genius at marketing, and left handers represented (and still do) only about five percent of the population. It is inconceivable that the SAA would have been designed for lefties.

As to the cavalryman shooting left handed and wielding the saber in the right, it's virtually impossible to do both, and still control the horse. It's also very difficult, if not impossible to cross over with the left hand, and draw from a right handed flap holster, which was standard issue.
Why don't you offer up some proof that it is indeed a right handed gun? You haven't yet, and everything you have posted could be called an urban myth as well.

I never mentioned using a saber.

It is only common sense that anyone, mounted or otherwise, who is right handed would be better served with the loading gate on the left, as well as the ejector rod, allowing the gun to remain in the hand used to fire it as soon as loaded. Switching back and forth is a good way to end up dead in a firefight, not to mention much slower than necessary.

We will have to agree to disagree here.
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Old 08-23-2009, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Gun 4 Fun View Post
Why don't you offer up some proof that it is indeed a right handed gun? You haven't yet, and everything you have posted could be called an urban myth as well.

I never mentioned using a saber.

It is only common sense that anyone, mounted or otherwise, who is right handed would be better served with the loading gate on the left, as well as the ejector rod, allowing the gun to remain in the hand used to fire it as soon as loaded. Switching back and forth is a good way to end up dead in a firefight, not to mention much slower than necessary.

We will have to agree to disagree here.
Hardly. You've made the claim that the SAA was designed for a left-handed shooter, offering no written evidence other than writing "it's a historical fact". Please, offer the historical fact to support your argument. Absent written proof, you've only offered allegation.

Niether R.L. Wilson, nor any other expert has written that the SAA was designed for a left-hander.

Further, no company designs a product for use by a vast majority, to specifications for a distinct minority.
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Old 08-23-2009, 04:57 PM
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A word of caution RE: Charter Southpaw FWIW
I ordered one for my L/H Son (Long wait 2 years ago) upon delivery, he took it for a shake down cruise. It did fine for 30 or so rounds in single action. When he went to D/A, the gun coughed to a halt after three cylinders worth. Action locked up tight. Charter in all of it's iterations over the years has had Q/C issues. My B/D from the early 70's was fine. In fact, my Son now has it! But when they're poor they are REALLY poor?
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Old 08-23-2009, 05:02 PM
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How about them Schofields and other break-tops, truly ambidextrous!
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Old 08-23-2009, 05:12 PM
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A Colt Forum thread on this very subject with some interesting pix of symmetrically designed SAAs:

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Old 08-23-2009, 05:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis The B View Post
Hardly. You've made the claim that the SAA was designed for a left-handed shooter, offering no written evidence other than writing "it's a historical fact". Please, offer the historical fact to support your argument. Absent written proof, you've only offered allegation.

Niether R.L. Wilson, nor any other expert has written that the SAA was designed for a left-hander.

Further, no company designs a product for use by a vast majority, to specifications for a distinct minority.
I recently read a long account of Sam Colt, and his designs, but I am having trouble locating it. I can't remember if it was online or in one of the thousands of magazines I have on hand. I am still sorta new to the whole computer/web thing, so it takes me a while to navigate to where I want to be.

That said, you still haven't offered me any proof to the contrary, other than the post you put up on the Colt forum listed above. I read the entire thing and none of them answered you definitvely either. Then you come back here and repeat them without mentioning where you got your info. Not very convincing.

If you are one who needs to have the last word, feel free.

I have stated what I have learned from reading, and from Colt enthusiasts. If that doesn't suit you, that is your problem. I am done wasting forum bandwidth on a subject best left for the appropriate sub-forum.

If you ever do get some factual proof that supports your position, I will be more than happy to read and accept it, if it is fact.
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Old 08-23-2009, 05:32 PM
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Nice but these guns don't have much to do with the question originally asked.
I always figured the reason the SAA loading gate was on the right was because the military told them to make it that way.
It would be sort of cool if someone were to make a true left handed double action revolver similar in quality to a S&W.
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Old 08-23-2009, 07:10 PM
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Nice but these guns don't have much to do with the question originally asked.
The thread did, that was why I linked it. Pretty much the same unresolved opinion beater. The pic was, umm, like a cherry on top.
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Old 08-23-2009, 11:33 PM
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I too am left handed but can't imagine having to learn how to handle a revolver all over again!

With we lefty's being under 10% of the population, it's no wonder why there are so darn few special made lefty things available.
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Old 08-24-2009, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Gun 4 Fun View Post
I recently read a long account of Sam Colt, and his designs, but I am having trouble locating it. I can't remember if it was online or in one of the thousands of magazines I have on hand. I am still sorta new to the whole computer/web thing, so it takes me a while to navigate to where I want to be.

That said, you still haven't offered me any proof to the contrary, other than the post you put up on the Colt forum listed above. I read the entire thing and none of them answered you definitvely either. Then you come back here and repeat them without mentioning where you got your info. Not very convincing.

If you are one who needs to have the last word, feel free.

I have stated what I have learned from reading, and from Colt enthusiasts. If that doesn't suit you, that is your problem. I am done wasting forum bandwidth on a subject best left for the appropriate sub-forum.

If you ever do get some factual proof that supports your position, I will be more than happy to read and accept it, if it is fact.
I've never felt the need to have the last word on anything.

My position was, and remains, that all the historical evidence points to the SAA being a right-handed revolver. All I'm asking, is that someone provide some type of empirical data that shows the SAA design by Colt was for a left hander.

Coincidence does not count. Happenstance does not count.

The fact that I ask a similar question on the Colt forum means only that I've sought out expertise outside my own area. I was taught from a young age to seek the advice of others who had experience and expertise outside my own sphere.

I'll gladly demur when the evidence appears.
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Old 09-22-2009, 10:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Gun 4 Fun View Post
The 1860 was indeed a cap and ball design. It makes sense that the nipple relief would be on the right side. The gun could remain in the stronghand while decapping/capping.
Excuse me? It's not simply a matter of strength, but of dexterity. A right-handed person would want to hold the revolver in their more clumsy left hand, while doing all the fine manipulation of loading powder, ball, and finally the delicate capping with their good right hand.

Quote:
You may not want to accept the fact that the SAA is a left handed gun, but it is a historical fact.
Really? Aside from the contrarian Texas Longhorn Arms of Bill Grover, are there any revolvers with a loading gate on the left side? Were the designers of the Merwin Hulbert, Nagant, and many others all left-handed? How about lever-action rifles?
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Old 09-22-2009, 12:12 PM
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My understanding is that military procedure in the mid 1800's called for shooting the revolver in you left hand. I think it was Civil War Times that did an article on this in the late 70's or early 80's. I probably still have that article somewhere but doubt if I can find it.

Their reasoning was along these lines.

First, look at holster design. Holsters were designed for left hand cross draw. Had to be because the saber was on hung for a right hand cross draw. A butt forward holster is easier to draw with either hand. The holsters rode high on the belt. A cross draw holster is much easier to draw from mounted if you holster is high on the belt.

Numerous after action battle reports from the official records were quoted and cited that mentioned an individual "Taking his revolver in his right hand". There would be no reason to specifically mention this if right handed shooting was the norm. The implication was that the shooter chose to fire right handed, because in that case accuracy was more essential that Army regulations.

Interestingly over half of the references to revolvers being used in combat were by artillery troops. Revolvers were used for counter cavalry defense, much the way we used M2 Brownings for ADA when I was in FA.
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S&W Revolvers: 1980 to the Present Thread, S&W Revolvers for Lefties in Smith & Wesson Revolvers; Did S&W make firearms for lefties? I am one and I would like to know if it is all in ...
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