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Old 10-19-2012, 10:54 PM
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Default Birchwood-Casey Tru-Oil and ArmorAll concoction for grip refinishing? - VS - tung oil

Has anybody considered the Birchwood-Casey Tru-Oil and ArmorAll concoction as an alternative to tung oil for refinishing grips!!??

It appears to be a better, quicker method of refinishing. Each "coat" is ready in "minutes" rather than days.

It is a very popular on another site, I did not know if I should post the "link"

The ArmorAll appears to "cure" the Birchwood-Casey Tru-Oil very quickly to reduce the time for refinishing.

The other site shows it used on rifle stocks, handgun stocks may be made from a different hardness wood.

Anybody have this on their S&W??
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Old 10-20-2012, 07:24 AM
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Tru-Oil by itself drys plenty fast. It's biggest problem, at least for me, is its almost mirror like shine. You can scuff the shine with steel wool, but it's hard to get an even amount of patina.

I always thought ArmorAll was silicone based. Silicone will flat out mess up any finish. Ask your collision shop paint guy. I can't imagine mixing it in.

Last edited by MichiganScott; 10-20-2012 at 08:09 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 10-20-2012, 07:57 AM
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When I want a less glossy classic oil finish, Formby's Low Gloss Tung Oil is my go to choice. The Formby's works great, cures in 24 hours and takes additional coats very well.

I've refinished numerous sets of grips and a couple gunstocks with the Formby's product. The results have been very good.
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Old 10-20-2012, 09:02 AM
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Default No Gloss

I'm still a fan of plain old Boiled Linseed Oil for a retro looking finish.

On this Cimarron/Uberti replica of a Colt 1971-1972 Open Top I stripped the original thick glossy finish with paint remover and rubbed in boiled linseed oil each day for a week.

It wasn't like I was in a hurry to carry it concealed or anything.



Same finish here on my .30-40 Krag...Boiled Linseed Oil. Get a scratch? Rub some more in.



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Old 10-20-2012, 09:50 AM
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Default Formby's Low GLoss Tung Oil

I stripped all the scratched and chipped old high gloss varnish off my wife's J.C. Higgins Levermatic .22 and refinished it with five coats of Formby's low gloss tung oil.Sanded with 0000 Scotchbrite between each coat. I could've gone for a few more coats to fill in all the pores, but it wouldn't look right with the somewhat worn metal on the rifle.
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Old 10-20-2012, 12:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cocked & Locked View Post

I'm still a fan of plain old Boiled Linseed Oil for a retro looking finish.
With all due respect for everyone else: Outstanding work! Mind if I ask what type of stripper you used?
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Old 10-20-2012, 01:42 PM
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With all due respect for everyone else: Outstanding work! Mind if I ask what type of stripper you used?
I think she was a Blonde

Back to the OP question, I have read about that concoction also. I see no reason to go mixing things. The True Oil can be re-coated in 2 hours or less so what's the hurry?

The other methods mentioned work well also
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Old 10-20-2012, 10:48 PM
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With all due respect for everyone else: Outstanding work! Mind if I ask what type of stripper you used?
"Strypeeze" in a blue and white can. It is a semi-jell, or so the can reads. Thanks!
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Old 10-20-2012, 11:38 PM
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I don't care for the BLO (chemically treated flax seed oil) It does penetrate into the wood but it also wears off easily. Tung oil is a different story, that stuff gets in there, stays there and you can build it up to a gloss. The 100% tung oil is a mess to work with but there are plenty of blends out there that make things easy enough for a novice to get a good finish.
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Old 10-21-2012, 02:50 AM
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I have refinished a few rifles and many many handgun stocks. I've tried Formby's Tung oil mixture (NOT pure Tung Oil), pure Linseed Oil, a few different Polyurethane's and Hopes 100% Tung Oil. I have never used the B/C Tru-oil so I can't comment on that one, but I can tell you that all I ever consider now is the Hopes PURE Tung Oil.

It is very easy to use, allows a stain to be use first, dries thoroughly and quickly, gives the option of glossy or mat finish depending on weather or not you steel wool it on the final coat. The best part is any time you need a touch up just lightly hit the stock with 0000 steel wool and apply another coat or two. By the way, it never goes bad because its 100% pure - no solvents to separate.

Other than on Browning shotguns I do not like a super glossy shine, and the Tung oil gives me a nice satin durable finish.

Chief38
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Old 10-21-2012, 05:13 AM
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I used a 50/50 mixture of pure Tung Oil and Mineral Spirits on a Garand stock and it works great. You can even cut the Tung Oil more by going 2/1 Mineral Spirits to Tung Oil. Goes on easier & dries quicker. The more coats you put on, the more gloss you get. Coats must be THIN and must dry COMPLETELY before the next is added and you remove any dust or raised grain with 0000 steel or bronze wool between coats. You get a real rubbed oil finish-emphasis on real.

Bruce
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Old 10-21-2012, 02:14 PM
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A Tung Oil Varnish like Formbys is what I use quite frequently.
I don't like Tru-oil and haven't used it for probably 30yrs. Never had good luck with it back then. Never cured/dried completely for me.
Others have great success with it.

The tung oil based varnishes are water proof,,or about as water proof as you can get. A straight linseed oil finish is 'classic', easy to repair and retouch/coat when ever you want. But it's as water proof as a sponge. Just the nature of the stuff.

With the right technique, and it isn't hard to do, you can get the same look with better protection using other materials. A lot less time involved too.

Most anything nearing a liquid form can be used to finish a piece of wood.
Some take longer to apply than others, repell moisture better, can be touched up better, dry quicker, take gloss better, build up on the wood as opposed to in the wood.
It all depends on what you want, are willing to wait for and sometimes what the gun you're working on demands for an original looking type finish.

There's no one single answer to which one is the best I don't think.
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Old 10-23-2012, 05:43 PM
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Here's the link to the process you're post is in reference to. I am surprised that this has not spread around because this refinishing process works and it's easy and fast. This is a tried and true way of obtaining an outstanding wood finish that you can accomplish in just a few hours. I used it on two different rifle stocks and I obtained a beautiful and professional looking finish. And it has proven to be durable. This link is more like a tutorial with pictures and all of the information you might desire. Happy reading. Esel

Woodstocks Amazin' Stock Finish & photos - RimfireCentral.com Forums
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S&W-Smithing Thread, Birchwood-Casey Tru-Oil and ArmorAll concoction for grip refinishing? - VS - tung oil in Ammunition-Gunsmithing; Has anybody considered the Birchwood-Casey Tru-Oil and ArmorAll concoction as an alternative to tung oil for refinishing grips!!?? It appears ...
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