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Old 08-31-2017, 11:09 AM
Green Frog Green Frog is offline
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Default Rechambering a cylinder*Update*

I'm in another of my projects... this time making a straight replica of the early post-War K-32. I have an original NOS barrel but plan to have a K-22 cylinder rebored to 32 S&W Long like the original was. However, I read Glen Fryxell's articles about a similar project and he mentioned using a special tight reamer for what is essentially a match chamber. Since mine will be rebored from 22 specs, it will be just as easy to do this as any other size.

My question is, since Glen's gunsmith is now retired, does anyone else have a similar reamer or know of someone who does? If possible, I'd like to just send the cylinder to whoever can perform this operation.

TIA ~ Froggie

Last edited by Green Frog; 09-10-2017 at 10:06 PM. Reason: Update
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Old 08-31-2017, 05:04 PM
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Actually, I thought Andy's chambers in the 2 that I had done by him were fairly tight. May not have made a difference but I went with.32 long on both rather than .327. Have a 4" 16-4 I may have lengthened to .327. Will see if anyone will chime in here that may willing do it. Good luck, Larry
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Old 08-31-2017, 05:12 PM
nedlate nedlate is offline
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I have a project such as this in mind too. And also have a NOS barrel. I have a donor prewar K38 but need to come up with a cylinder. Is the prewar 22 cylinder different than a post war cylinder?
Ed
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Old 08-31-2017, 07:00 PM
WR Moore WR Moore is offline
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Considering that the MAP of the .327 Federal is higher than that of the .357 Magnum, I'd hesitate to rechamber a cylinder originally intended for .22 lr. I'd not bet that either the steel or the heat treat would be up to the challenge. At least on anything made before about 1960. Maybe not then.

You might know someone who's done it and hasn't had a problem-yet. People hit the lottery too.

Last edited by WR Moore; 08-31-2017 at 07:02 PM.
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Old 08-31-2017, 09:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WR Moore View Post
Considering that the MAP of the .327 Federal is higher than that of the .357 Magnum, I'd hesitate to rechamber a cylinder originally intended for .22 lr. I'd not bet that either the steel or the heat treat would be up to the challenge. At least on anything made before about 1960. Maybe not then.

You might know someone who's done it and hasn't had a problem-yet. People hit the lottery too.
The cylinder walls of a 327 are also considerably thicker (.021) than a 357 and I bet that S&W now heat treats the cylinders all in a large batch before they ever go to where they get chambered. Dimensions change when steel is hardened and tempered. Making critical cuts before heat treatment would be ill adviced and cylinders are still soft enough after HT to be easily machinable.

I have made K22 cylinders into 22 harvey kay chuck (a shortened, blown out 22 hornet case) and 22 TCM. Neither have had any problems.

Last edited by steelslaver; 08-31-2017 at 09:34 PM.
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Old 08-31-2017, 10:35 PM
Green Frog Green Frog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WR Moore View Post
Considering that the MAP of the .327 Federal is higher than that of the .357 Magnum, I'd hesitate to rechamber a cylinder originally intended for .22 lr. I'd not bet that either the steel or the heat treat would be up to the challenge. At least on anything made before about 1960. Maybe not then.

You might know someone who's done it and hasn't had a problem-yet. People hit the lottery too.
I've already been through the high power 32 conversion... I have Project 616 in 327 Fed Mag, so I wasn't asking that question in this thread... I'm interested in having this blue steel K-22 cylinder cut to 32 S&W Long for target loads. I sincerely doubt that I will generate pressures that would exceed 38 Special levels, much less any of the magnum ones, so your concern is not applicable to this project.

I would be curious as to how you reached your conclusions for the elimination of the K-frame cylinder for the 327 FM since several reputable gunsmiths such as Hamilton Bowen, Andy Horvath, and others have felt safe putting their names on such conversions. I know both of the gunsmiths mentioned considered a relined barrel to have insufficient strength for the application, but no mention was ever made of cylinder strength. Do you have some information they (and I) should know about in this regard?

nedlate, I responded to your post on my i-Pad earlier this evening but it got lost in the ether... I'll go back to that unit and see if I can recover it.

Froggie
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Old 08-31-2017, 11:05 PM
Green Frog Green Frog is offline
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Nedlate, I had no joy looking for my lost post, so here is what I remember of what I said there;

First, I asked about the barrel you have. Is it a pre-War 32 S&W Long barrel (and so marked?) If it is a post-War barrel it will have a rib that will be missing on the pre-War version. In fact, the only difference between the pre-War Target barrel and the M&P (fixed sight) version is provision on the front to put a target front sight blade, a feature that has been observed even on some "half target" guns.

As for pre- and post-War cylinders, that information is way above my pay grade... I would send my friend Hondo44 a PM to ask that. I do know that the pre-War ejector rod will have a knob on it that most post-War ones lack, and that some time after the war the direction of the threads on the e-rod were reversed. Pre-War barrels usually have a relief cut for that knob to clear. As to fitting the whole unit from one to the other, you'll have to ask somebody like Hondo44.

That's about all I can say in response to your question, nedlate. Hope it helped at least a little.

Froggie

Last edited by Green Frog; 08-31-2017 at 11:06 PM.
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Old 09-01-2017, 03:53 AM
nedlate nedlate is offline
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Thanks for the reply. I have a pre war barrel bought off the classifieds here a couple of years ago, it doesn't have a front sight but I have one. I need a cylinder still.
Ed
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Old 09-04-2017, 06:14 PM
WR Moore WR Moore is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Green Frog View Post
I'm interested in having this blue steel K-22 cylinder cut to 32 S&W Long for target loads. I sincerely doubt that I will generate pressures that would exceed 38 Special levels, much less any of the magnum ones, so your concern is not applicable to this project.

I would be curious as to how you reached your conclusions for the elimination of the K-frame cylinder for the 327 FM ...... Do you have some information they (and I) should know about in this regard?
I went back and re-read your OP, I missed a couple of words and thought you were going to .327 FM. I also missed the qualification "replica" and thought you were doing this on an early post war S&W. You'll note my qualifier on post 1960's being safer. My bad. Gotta quit posting when I'm tired & it's late.

Several decades ago, I smithed. I do know that in or around 1958, S&W set up new standards on materials and heat treatment that (probably) covered all models. I suspect they did so for good reason. After the development of 38 +P ammo, they stated that any of their firearms made after that date were safe to use with that ammo. Thus my qualifier. I do think your plan to convert a gun to .32 S&W Long to be both doable and safe.

I don't know what Mr Bown and Mr Hamilton do, but I strongly suspect they'd be hesitant to modify the earlier guns I thought you were talking about to .327 FM.

I refused to do certain work because I didn't think it was safe. I might have been occasionally wrong, but I never killed, crippled or injured a customer. Yes, I did have a couple of guys come back and ask if I could fix the results when someone else did the work I refused.

Last edited by WR Moore; 09-04-2017 at 06:19 PM.
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Old 09-04-2017, 07:03 PM
Green Frog Green Frog is offline
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I've also seen some scary things proposed by shooters who either didn't know any better or who got a bad case of tunnel vision when they got a "great idea."

When I had Project 616 built by Andy Horvath, I researched it pretty thoroughly, hence my question to you. It is chambered in 327 Fed Mag and used a standard Model 66 (no dash) donor gun, a Model 617-2 cylinder rebored and rechambered, and a rebored Model 617 barrel. Nobody has yet challenged its strength and safety, hence my question.

Back to the subject of this particular thread, I was fortunate enough to obtain a NOS K-32 barrel (tapered with narrow rib - the early style) and a good K-22 cylinder assembly to rebore, so I feel pretty safe building a gun in 32 S&W Long using these parts. Thanks for your interest.

Froggie
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Old 09-04-2017, 08:02 PM
WR Moore WR Moore is offline
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BTW, forgot to note that the "big name" gunsmiths might be able to call a contact at the factory for inside dope on materials, heat treat and genereal suitability. It's been decades since I had anything like that access and anyone I knew back then is probably also retired.
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Old 09-10-2017, 10:17 PM
Green Frog Green Frog is offline
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Update* I just won a Model 15-2 on GunChoker tonight. So adding it up, I now have a NOS narrow rib K-32 barrel, a K-22 cylinder assembly to rechamber, and a donor 38 with a narrow rib frame/barrel. Once I have it all in hand and double checked to make sure it all goes together properly, it's off to an as-yet-to-be-named gunsmith to do the deed. I would have preferred a 5 screw frame, but this is not an perfect copy nor is meant to fool anyone, so 3 screws should do it. Stay tuned for further updates!

Froggie
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Old 09-10-2017, 10:28 PM
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Sounds interesting, keep us in the loop Froggie. Include pics if'n ya can.
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Old 09-11-2017, 09:56 PM
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Glad you finally found a model 15 for the project. It will be a nice gun without the high cost. Plus you can shoot it and not mess up a collectible gun. Larry
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Old 09-11-2017, 10:15 PM
Green Frog Green Frog is offline
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Glad you finally found a model 15 for the project. It will be a nice gun without the high cost. Plus you can shoot it and not mess up a collectible gun. Larry
Roger that... if I want more power, I can always unlimber Project 616 and blast away to my heart's content, but this will be a gun that I can take out with WC and SWC cat sneeze loads to just enjoy myself. I know I may have to turn in my "Hairy Legged He-Man" Card for admitting it, but I really enjoy that kind of shooting.

Froggie
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Old 09-12-2017, 08:22 AM
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You'll have a lot less money in it also and it'll shoot just as good. Money well spent. Larry
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Old 09-12-2017, 09:09 PM
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Look forward to seeing how your project turns out, hope you can post some photos.
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