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Old 05-30-2009, 06:55 PM
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Is it very hard to replace this bushing in a 686-6 or should I have it done. The money is pretty tight and I am on SS, so any help would be deeply appreciated. Also, is there a place you can go to read how to do this? Thanks in advance.
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Old 05-30-2009, 07:01 PM
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Hey piggyback - what bushing are you talking about?
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Old 05-30-2009, 07:03 PM
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Hammer nose bushings are easy to replace. All you need is a pin punch of the correct size for removal, and a center punch for installation.

The removed hammer is supported on a bench block or a slab of hardwood with a 1/4" hole. Use the pin pun to drive the old bushing out of the hammer. Replace hammer nose striker, install replacement bushing, and use the center punch to flare the end of the bushing to secure it. Make sure that the bushing ends do not stick out and scrape the frame as the hammer is worked.
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Old 05-30-2009, 07:19 PM
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Not running with a full load tonight .
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Old 05-30-2009, 07:36 PM
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I know, maybe I should start all over again. When I looked at the schematics, I thought it was a hammer nose bushing, but I am not a gunsmith. My primer leaked, and I am talking about the part that is in the breach right behind the primer, so if that is a hammer nose bushing, then that is what I need to replace, but I am not sure. I have had the whole gun apart, except I have never removed that part. I am a mentally retired machinist by faith have it. Another words, they decided that they didn't need any more machinists in America. Anyway, anything will help. This is the second gun in 6 months that I have had a Federal primer leak. The first one I scraped the whole frame and Smith and Wesson was very nice to me. This one I will buy.
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Old 05-30-2009, 07:45 PM
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Removing/replacing a firing pin bushing (in the frame) requires special tools and a milling machine, as well as removing the barrel. Best to leave it to S&W or a qualified gunsmith.
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Old 05-30-2009, 08:03 PM
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Thanks a lot John, I was hoping for something easy! I guess it doesn't get any easier. Now I have to pull about 500 rounds apart. I guess when I get time I will have to give everybody a heads up on either the Federal primers or the Remington brass, not sure what is causing it yet. Thanks for letting me know about this.
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Old 05-31-2009, 11:25 AM
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Back in the early days of the M686 S&W received some complaints of primer flow back into the bushing which seized the firing pin and locked up the gun. As it was explained to me back then, S&W realized that there were some softer primers available on the market which could potentially allow this condition to occur.

The designed a revised bushing & firing pin and then a special tool kit, accompanied by written instructions, for LE revolver armorers to use to remove the old parts and replacement them with the new ones. The barrel did not have to be removed. A punch/stamp was also included to stamp the inside of the yoke with a "M" to designate that the revolver had received the modification.

I have the instructions stashed away somewhere among my collection of manuals, but I don't have the tools.

Personally, I wouldn't attempt it without the tools ... as well as digging out the instructions.

This reminds me. I actually know a retired armorer who still has this special field tool kit and I've sometimes thought about asking him what he would take for it, just to add it to my collection of S&W tools.
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Old 06-01-2009, 01:42 PM
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Gentlemen, not wanting to come off as a smart a**, the hammer nose bushing is the bushing in the frame behind the primer.

I too agree that it should be done by S&W or a gunsmith.

Hawkeye
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Old 06-01-2009, 02:39 PM
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Quote:
... the hammer nose bushing is the bushing in the frame behind the primer.
Yep.

Not something normally done by armorers, either.

That's why S&W had to put together a special field tool kit and instructions for LE armorers to use to modify the early 686's, if they chose to do so and didn't just return the guns to the factory. Apparently they didn't think all the LE agencies using them would want to have to return all the guns to the factory.

Ours were modified at our agency, and until they had received the modification we were restricted to using either standard or +P .38 Spl.

The former (retired) revolver armorer for my former agency (since I'm now retired, too ) showed me the tool kit and instructions one time and explained to me what was involved. I'd rather have the factory do it, myself.
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Old 06-01-2009, 11:56 PM
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Not to worry. I guess there is no cheap way out of this. Its one of my first guns, and my favorite gun. I have about 60 hours of finishing in it. It shines like no tomorrow, so I guess I will see how Smith and Wesson likes it. Its so shiny you can see your face in it. Thanks a lot for all of the advice. I don't think I will ever put another Federal primer in it.
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Old 06-02-2009, 06:43 PM
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I love the Gunsmith section because I can learn so much by reading others problems and solutions.
Lets see if I get this right,
For those people out there like me learning, Here is a picture of my model 586 yoke with "M"stamp indicating hammer nose mod.
SCSW ed 3 says the models 581 & 581-1 , 586 and 586-1 from 1981 to 1987 were the ones made prior to the subsequent hammer nose modification.
The 1987 581-2, 586-2 forward had the hammer nose and associated parts changed during production.
S&W 581 and 586 models that had the hammer nose retrofitted are identified by this "M" stamp.
Its good to know when looking to buy an older 586/581 so you can check to see if the mod was done.
Does anyone know if S&W will still repair the models covered under the recall?


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Old 06-02-2009, 08:42 PM
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I was working for a gun shop when the L frame problem came up. As I had recently attended the S&W armorers school, S&W wanted to know if I would take on the recall work. I said yes and ended up doing around 600 revolvers, for LE agencies and customers who brought their guns in. The gun shop owner and I split the fee S&W gave us and he covered the insurance as well. I still have all the tools and lots of the replacement parts left. I had one gun, out of all of them that I worked on, that I could not get to work correctly after the modification. Ended up sending it back to S&W and they had to replace the frame. The gun belonged to our local Sheriff's Dept. S&W also provided all the .357 ammo needed to check out the modification too.
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327, 581, 586, 686, gunsmith, l frame, m686, model 686, primer, remington, smith and wesson

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