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Old 11-23-2008, 02:13 AM
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I bought a nice Colt Detective Special (3rd issue; made in 1973). The gun has timing problem. Can someone please tell me how can I fix timing on this gun.

Thanks!

Mike
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Old 11-23-2008, 02:13 AM
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I bought a nice Colt Detective Special (3rd issue; made in 1973). The gun has timing problem. Can someone please tell me how can I fix timing on this gun.

Thanks!

Mike
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Old 11-23-2008, 10:12 AM
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You will need a new "paw", as COLT calls their part where S&W calls it a "hand". it needs to be longer, so measure it and order the next size up..COLT hands are made longer to fix timing and S&W hands are made wider..so there should not be too much fitting needed on the COLT..
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Old 11-23-2008, 10:25 AM
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Thank you, all5x. Where do I order the paw from? - I checked Brownells and Midway and they don't list parts for Colt DS.

Mike
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Old 11-23-2008, 10:55 AM
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Try Gun Parts Corporation in NYC, NY, and Jack First Gun Shop in rapid CIty, South Dakota.

GPC has an online ordering site with exploded view diagrams, and Jack First only takes telephone orders.
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Old 11-23-2008, 11:21 AM
haggis haggis is offline
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Mike,

The correct term is "pawl". I would suggest getting a copy of Kuhnhausen's "The Colt Double Action Revolvers, Vol. 1" from Brownell's. Colt internals are very different from S&W's, with many parts having multiple functions. I wouldn't tear into a Colt without it, especially if your experiance level is not high.

Buck
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Old 11-23-2008, 11:44 AM
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Thanks guys, I am okay with revolversmithing. Have experience with S&W's and Ruger's. But this is my first Colt...

Removed the crane and sideplate. The lockwork is quite different from S&W but it's pretty clear how it works. The pawl/hand is worn - rounded on the outside. It does not carry up enough before the trigger breaks in DA. SA is fine. Getting a longer pawl (or a longer hammer strut if it is available) should solve it.

Checked Numrich website - thanks, John T. They have a copy of original pawl but there is no mention of oversize pawls. Will try calling Jack First tomorrow. Does Colt still sell parts for DS?

Mike
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Old 11-23-2008, 02:02 PM
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A common gunsmithing fix on old-style Colt DA pawls is to peen it on the sides to stretch it a few thousandths. The Colt DA relies on the length of the pawl to carry up the chamber to locked position, unlike the S&W which uses the thicknes of the hand to carry up to locked position.

The pawl should be readily available, since the DS is the same size frame as the Police Positive Special, which was made in near 1,000,000 quantities.
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Old 11-23-2008, 07:48 PM
dfariswheel dfariswheel is offline
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First, Colt calls the part a "Hand" not a pawl.

Second, new hands are near impossible to find, but it's possible that Jack First is making new ones as replacements
http://www.jackfirstgun.com/

The hand is not something you want to play around with unless you really know how it works, because the old Colt action works NOTHING like a S&W or Ruger.

The "correct" procedure for the Colt is to attempt to stretch the hand IF POSSIBLE, rather than replace it, because there's a LOT of fitting involved in fitting a new Colt hand.

To stretch, FIRST make sure it's hasn't been stretched before. These parts are a ONE TIME stretch part. Try it again and they usually crack or break.

To stretch, use a 1/2" wide chisel that's had the edges slightly rounded off and well polished.
Put the hand on a bench anvil and put the punch on the inside of the hand in the RECESSED area near the bottom.
Tap with a light hammer to slightly stretch the hand.
Lightly polish to remove and ridges left by stretching.

Here's how to correctly check the old Colt action for timing:

BOLT RETRACTION AND "SNAP BACK".
Open the cylinder and look at the small "lug" in the bottom of the cylinder window. This is the cylinder locking bolt.
Cock the hammer, and watch as the bolt retracts into the frame and pops back out.
The bolt MUST begin to retract THE INSTANT the hammer begins to move.
There MUST be NO (ZERO) hammer movement possible before the bolt starts to retract.
The bolt should retract smoothly with no hesitation until it's fully retracted, then it MUST pop back out with a clean "snap".
There should be no hesitation, and no amount of "creeping" back out.

CYLINDER UNLOCKING.
Close the cylinder.
Use your left thumb or fore finger to again cock the hammer, closely watching the cylinder bolt as you SLOWLY cock the hammer.
As the hammer comes back, the bolt will retract away from the cylinder.
The bolt MUST retract far enough to unlock the cylinder BEFORE the cylinder begins to rotate.
If the bolt is still slightly engaged with the cylinder lock notch, the cylinder will be attempting to turn while still partially locked.
This produces a "catch" or "hard spot" in the trigger pull and will damage both the bolt and the cylinder lock notches.
This often appears as metal "pulled out" of the lock notches, with rounded off and burred notches.

BOLT DROP TIMING.
Continue to cock the hammer, LIGHTLY laying your right index finger on the cylinder just enough to prevent "free wheeling".
Watch for the bolt to drop back onto the cylinder. WHERE the bolt drops is CRITICAL.
The bolt MUST drop onto the leade or ramp in front of the actual cylinder notch.
If the bolt drops too soon, (in front of the notch ramp), it will mar the finish of the cylinder.
The bolt SHOULD drop into “about” the MIDDLE of the ramp.
If the bolt drops late, (farther toward the actual locking notch) the revolver may display "cylinder throw-by".
In this condition, during double action shooting the cylinder may rotate PAST the locking notch, and fire in an unlocked condition.
It's the nature of the Colt action, that a hesitant or jerky trigger pull by the user can induce throw-by in even a properly tuned Colt.
The Colt trigger should be pulled with a smooth, even pull, with no sudden jerks at the beginning.

CYLINDER LOCKUP.
Continue to pull the hammer back and both watch and listen for the bolt to drop into the cylinder lock notch.
The bolt MUST drop into the actual lock notch BEFORE the hammer reaches full cock.
The most common Colt mis-time situation is the hammer cocks before the bolt drops into the lock notch. (Hammer is cocked, but cylinder isn't locked).
In this condition, with the hammer fully cocked, you can push the cylinder slightly, and you will hear the "CLICK" as the bolt drops into lock.
In my experience, most Colt's leave the factory with the bolt dropping a little late into the leade, but usually wear in to correct timing.
If the bolt drops onto the cylinder early, no real problem, but there will be extra finish wear.
If the bolt drops late (closer to the lock notch) the cylinder may "throw by" or rotate TOO far in double action and this can cause off-center primer hits and firing while unlocked.

Each of these checks should be done on EACH chamber. All of these checks are better done individually. In other words, do the bolt retraction check on all six chambers, then do the bolt drop test, and so on.

A properly tuned Colt will:
Have a smoothly functioning bolt with no sticky or hesitant movement.

Unlock before the cylinder begins to turn.

The bolt will drop onto the middle of the ramp.

The bolt will drop into the lock notch before the hammer reaches full cock.

Have a smooth trigger pull, which does "stack" or get heavier as the trigger is pulled.
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Old 11-23-2008, 08:05 PM
2152hq 2152hq is offline
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The outside edge of the hand only contact the ratchet on it's initial push, then the second step takes over. Only the inner edge of the hands lower step contact the ratchet teeth to move the cylinder into FINAL position.
>
The upper part initially pushes the cylinder partially around so the second step can engage it. It's the lower engagement tooth of the hand that gets the brunt of the wear and is usually worn too short (or burred over) to move the cylinder the needed few .000" into postion.
>
A longer hand or stretching the hand will sometimes work but be aware that the hammer/trigger movement is more on SA than it is on DA.
So a gun that times on SA with it's longer hand movement, may not time on DA. Get it to time on DA and it may jam up on SA because the cylinder is locked into position by the bolt with the hand still pushing against the ratchet and your thumb providing the power trying to cock it. It's a very touchy mechanism to time correctly. I'd recommend Kuhnhausen's book as haggis did if you've never worked on a Colt DA before. Even if you have, it's full of good info and tips, good to have around if you work on revolvers. And don't try to lengthen the DA strut, it will cause other problems.
>
I've had better luck stretching the hand by crimping them aginst a small section of triangle shaped file slightly blunted in my mill vise. I put the hand against the stationary vise jaw with the pin inward, place the file piece against the hand about midway accross it and then a piece of scrap steel to protect the moveable vise jaw and close it up. If everything's in allaigment, a firm tightning of the vise will press the hard somewhat blunt triangle shaped file into the hand and do what a peening job does but a bit neater and more controlled.
One crimp will get about .004" in additional lengthening. It doesn't bent them at all lengthwise like a peening job often does and all that is necessary afterwards is to lightly stone the slight burr off the ends of the crimp.
>
Colt DA parts are not cheap,,hands can run $25/30 and up if you can find them and most of them come from 'parts' guns that didn't work well to begin with.
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Old 11-23-2008, 08:57 PM
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Thanks very much for detailed write-ups, guys! I get good schooling here for sure.

dfariswheel, Checked the gun as you suggested. Everything checks out except for cylinder lock-up in DA – it’s too late. In a normal pull, I can see that cylinder is still completing its turn AFTER the hammer fell down all the way; not good. Worse yet I can see marring from bullets hitting left hand side of the forcing cone…

2152hq, I see your point about wear on the outside of the upper tooth of the hand. It’s probably caused by closing cylinder too fast and is not related to timing. Lower tooth and the star have no visible wear on them. Chances are that’s the way the gun left factory 35 yrs ago…

I also see your point about timing in SA vs. timing in DA. It does look like a delicate adjustment job. Getting a copy of Kuhnhausen book starts sounding like a really good idea.

Mike

P.S. Late breaking news: Colt Inc. wasn't much help, but I was able to order a new hand ("manufactured and hardened to original manufacturer's specifications") from Numrich. Good to have a spare hand on hand when I start stretching the only one I got...
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Old 11-24-2008, 05:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by dfariswheel:
First, Colt calls the part a "Hand" not a pawl.
Dr. D is correct about this, as he usually is in all matters Colt. There are other manufacturers that call it a pawl.

2152hq, nice tip about crimping the hand to stretch it. The blunt chisel has always seemed a bit too "hit or miss" to me.

Buck
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Old 11-24-2008, 07:04 PM
dfariswheel dfariswheel is offline
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2152hq
Neat trick on swaging the hand to stretch it.
After 30 years in Colt's I'm still learning new tricks.
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Old 11-25-2008, 01:10 AM
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Okay, guys, happy end.

I went ahead and peened the hand following Dr. D.'s advice. Tried swaging first but wasn't getting very far - I either didn't get right tools or right skills Peening worked nicely - the hand stretched by 0.008" (measured from the second tooth to bottom of the hand). That took care of my timing problem.

In slow motion hammer and bolt now drop at the same time. In normal pull bolt locks much earlier. SA is fine as it was before. I wouldn't mind stretching the hand by another 0.002-0.004" but it started bending and I figured it was time to stop. When the new hand arrives from Numrich, I'll see if I can fit it better, leaving some room for future wear.

Thanks again for all your help!

Mike
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Old 11-25-2008, 04:03 AM
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Interesting and informative thread! Well done guys!
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Old 11-25-2008, 08:25 PM
dfariswheel dfariswheel is offline
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I also second buying the Kuhnhausen Volume One Colt DA revolver manual.

The Colt hand is a far more complicated part than observation would indicate.
Virtually every surface has a purpose and needs to be hand fitted.
The manual has page after page of information on the hand, far more than you might expect.

The hand design really brings home just how "19th Century" the Colt action really is.
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Old 12-04-2008, 02:13 AM
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Kuhnhausen manual arrived today. After reading it for couple of hours I want to say that the book is well worth the money. Great pictures and very detailed descriptions.

I wasn't too impressed by Colt's trigger... Used pin trick from the book and was able to quickly adjust trigger pull to my liking. Very nice.

Thanks again, guys!



Mike
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Old 12-08-2008, 04:22 PM
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D is totaly on the money with his Colt smarts. I have passed on beautiful Pythons, Cobras ect. I very much like the Colt revolvers, but if they go out of whack, I can't fix em, and parts are hard to comeby. I can perform basic repairs on a Smith, but I would not even venture to open up a Colt.
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Old 12-08-2008, 04:36 PM
robertrwalsh robertrwalsh is offline
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Colts are like that. A Smith lets you fix just one thing (usually). On a Colt everything you fix affects something else. Last one I worked on extensivley was an Official Police and it took me 6 steady hours of work to get it set up 100%. (Of course, somebody who did a LOT of Colts could no doubt have done it much quicker.)
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Old 01-04-2017, 03:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dfariswheel View Post

The "correct" procedure for the Colt is to attempt to stretch the hand IF POSSIBLE, rather than replace it, because there's a LOT of fitting involved in fitting a new Colt hand....
Apologies for dredging up an old thread, I found it when looking for info about repairing Colt timing. I was going to PM, but there was no option for you for me to do so.

Can Colt hands be micro-welded to build up the worn spot on the hand tip where the final push comes from?

As to micro-welding, I took a barrel/flash suppressor to a welder to weld the pin into the flash suppressor, it was a 1/8" pin cut flush with the surface of the flash suppressor. I thought hed simply make a tack, but he micro-welded it on the edge of the pin all the way around it, the bead in a tiny circle can easily be seen when he was done. I had no idea such fine work was possible. I mention it because it would seem possible to build up the tip of the hand without heating it up too much. Is this a viable method to get a Colt that's late timed back in operation?

I was surprised at how reasonably priced many older Colt revolvers are, though the lack of parts and gunsmiths that can work on them, and the number of them Ive seen out of time have me hesitant to get too interested unless I knew there was a way I could work on them or get them affordably re-timed.

The book is good advice, though I'm curious if micro-welding the hand is a viable method before proceeding with the book and gun.
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Old 01-04-2017, 03:45 PM
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I think it would be possible. The only problem I can forsee is the the integrity or "hardness" of the weld material. I'm not sure how well the added on material/metal would hold up with continued use.

I've wondered if this would be an option for worn ratchets on extractors. Since they are not making new extractors for the older models many of us are still shooting, I think we are soon to find out.

I have used Micro Precision Welding before with good results, but not for repair of a worn hand.

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Old 01-04-2017, 03:56 PM
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I agree it may not be optimal, but would at least allow the gun to be timed and useful again.

Ive considered trying it with a Smith hand. I have one gun that the largest hand I have isn't quite enough to get it to time. It had a hand fitted in the past. One guy was supposed to have worked at the factory, when he fitted the hand, he filed the RIGHT side of the hand window to get it to fit. It lasted about 150 rds before it was acting the same again. It may be that the only way to get it timed correctly again will be to build up the side of the tip of the hand and work it down to fit.

Im hoping dfariswheel will weigh in with his thoughts on welding the Colt hand.

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Old 01-04-2017, 09:45 PM
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Welding might work, but you'd be faced with essentially having to re-fit it like it was a brand new part, which can be tough.

Jack First is now manufacturing new replica critical Colt revolver action parts like the hand and cylinder locking bolt.

Personally, before welding I'd buy a copy of the Kuhnhausen Shop Manual from Brownell's and a new replica hand from Jack First and just start over.

One issue with welding and other expedients is that the small Colt's are almost always defense guns and that's something you don't want to chance a failure on due to softening of the steel or other problems.

You can try welding, but I personally wouldn't trust my life to the gun.
If you go with welding, give the gun a good work out and report back how it stood up.

One thing I failed to completely explain in the original post was that you get a chisel and grind the face flat, then lightly round the edges and polish.
Going back and reading it, I made it sound like you used a SHARP chisel.

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Old 01-04-2017, 10:14 PM
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No, I got what you meant. I also saw your reply on the subject on the Colt forum after I was here. I also found the Jack First parts after I was here, somebody else mentioned them elsewhere. Thanks for bringing them up though. They look like a realistic option, and not priced too bad. At least having them available gives one more options than trying to stretch a hand and breaking it with no parts available other than more used parts of unknown wear.

Thanks for giving your thoughts on the subject of welding the hand up. I understand the reluctance in trusting a welded part. I figured the micro weld probably wouldn't affect most of the hand, though the tooth of the hand may be softer once worked back to shape. Given how soft the internals are on the Uberti revolvers, it may be OK. They wear, but they work for the time being apparently, just not as long as harder parts before needing attention. If I do try it, I'll give what info I can, and try to take pics as I go. I don't have a gun at the moment, but they interest me. I didn't want to get strung out on Colts and not be realistic to be able to work on them or get parts, but it seems they can be worked on to some degree to get them back to carrying up correctly. I'm surprised at how reasonable many of the older Colt DAs are priced, even Officers Model Match guns.

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Old 01-04-2017, 11:46 PM
Mike, SC Hunter Mike, SC Hunter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john traveler View Post
A common gunsmithing fix on old-style Colt DA pawls is to peen it on the sides to stretch it a few thousandths. The Colt DA relies on the length of the pawl to carry up the chamber to locked position, unlike the S&W which uses the thicknes of the hand to carry up to locked position.

The pawl should be readily available, since the DS is the same size frame as the Police Positive Special, which was made in near 1,000,000 quantities.
.....x2........Did the "peen job" on my python to bring it back in time........
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Old 01-05-2017, 12:09 AM
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I would think welding would work, but it may be a little over the top. If you think about it, they have been welding up 1st gen Colt SAA hammers and triggers then re-cutting and finishing them for some time now. I am sure it would work with the right welding material used.

However, as DFW stated, reproductions hands are now being made and would be a much easier option. Jack First is actually making just about all the internal parts again, except rebound levers. Most are priced appropriately too. Although for a serviceable hand, peening will solve the issue.

Go over to the Colt forum and there are a bunch of 'sticky' threads in the Smithing section that deal with working on the Colt V spring. One of them is dedicated to hand stretching. I created them because a lack thereof existed. DFW contributed very useful tips, hints, and cautions in the threads too. Check them out.
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Old 01-05-2017, 09:23 PM
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You can buy Colt DA revolvers at pretty good prices as long as they ain't Pythons, New Service's, snubby barrels, and usually if they don't have adjustable sights.

Official Police, Police Positive and Police Positive Specials, and others can be had at low prices and make excellent shooters.
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Old 01-06-2017, 04:18 PM
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"Official Police, Police Positive and Police Positive Specials, and others can be had at low prices and make excellent shooters. "

I haven't seen ANY of those Colts recently at what could be considered a low price. Everything that I see for sale, the seller wants at least $500. I guess that's the Python effect.
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Old 05-29-2017, 11:44 PM
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So..... Just yesterday I tore my whole revolver apart. I know DFariswheel has heard my whine about it in the past. I was getting off center primer strikes and another guy one time told me it was out of time. Another Smith at a gun store.

But here's what I can see at present. My bolt definitely moves immediately upon pulling the trigger. It does snap back like it seems like it should, BUT it's snapping back early. It drops onto the cylinder before the ramp starts. I can see the drag line start clearly, before the ramp. However, I don't get how I was getting off center primer strikes. When I do pull the trigger, I can feel the bolt dropping in before the trigger is all the way to the rear and before it falls. It sure seems like the cylinder is locked up at the time of the hammer dropping.

It does show to be sluggish on some of the cylinders when pulling back the hammer for single action. However, even in the cases it does 4 sometimes 3 times out of the 6, even though it's sluggish to fall in when pulling back the hammer slowly, it falls in when the hammer drops. And another weird thing. Sometimes it depends on the orientation of the gun. If I have it laying on it's right side, it's 4 times it's sluggish. If I have it on it's right side, it's only 3 and sometimes less. Vertical it's usually 3....

Maybe my cleaning did something, maybe it didn't. It was fun to pull the whole gun apart. I'm going to range tomorrow, with several different brands of ammo. Will try to check for accuracy and off center primer hits. It sure seems like it should be locked when I pull the trigger while dry firing though...... Any input is welcomed. I apologize to prolong my problem I set it aside for a while and chew on what to do about it. This last week it dawned on me to try and see if pulling it apart and a light cleaning would do anything.

Side note: Something so fascinating about how these things go together.





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Old 05-30-2017, 12:06 AM
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Just a note here .........

Colt's do lock up differently than Smith's do. If the trigger is pulled ever so slowly, many Colts will seem out of time while in actuality that is how they are designed.

Just wanted to give you the heads up before doing any unnecessary work. I'd bring the Colt to a Colt guy who can confirm if it is actually out of time or not - - not saying you are wrong - but they are definitely different than Smith's!
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Old 05-30-2017, 06:29 AM
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New Longer hand/paw

***also consider putting the original hand on a flat metal surface and tapping (or striking it with a flat nose hammer) to lengthen it
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Old 05-30-2017, 05:39 PM
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Yeah, I'm undecided. It seems like it is. My primer strikes are more off centered than my other revolvers. That being said, I do get off center with my Model 19 and 442, just not as drastic.

I shot it today and my first shot I completely missed the target. I can't get it to group for me. I don't know if it's me, the gun, or both.... But I shoot my 442 a ton better. My friend actually did a little better with it than I did. But it's still hard to tell if it's out of time or not. It seems like it's not when I'm dryfiring. Maybe I'm just not used to that stacking trigger. It's a lot lighter than my 442's though. By like 5 pounds. But that stacking might be throwing me. I need to test it again sometime. It didn't seem like it was dangerous, but I don't really know.....
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Old 05-30-2017, 07:51 PM
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I recommend buying the Kuhnhausen book before doing anything.

"Usually" the correction for early bolt drop is to bend the "tail" of the bolt in toward the rebound lever.
This will delay bot drop and drop it into the leade before the actual cylinder locking notch.
Note that you remove the bolt each time you bend it. Attempting to bend the bolt while it's in the gun will often snap off the head of the bolt screw.
Like most parts Colt, the screw usually has to be fitted.

Having to totally disassemble the action each time you make a small bend in the bolt then reassemble to see if it's right is one reason Colt's are so aggravating to work on.
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Old 05-30-2017, 10:22 PM
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Yeah, that sounds like fun.... NOT. It wasn't a hard job, but that screw that holds the bolt in, that took me several, several times to get it to grab and be in the right spot.

Thank you for constantly trying to educate me on how it supposed to work.
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Old 06-03-2017, 11:10 AM
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A thought hit me. I wonder if my barrel is excessively leaded. Might explain the bad accuracy. It's probably grasping at straws but I know I've never cleaned the lead out well. I didn't know you needed to do it with copper or clean it special. I know I've shot some lead through it over the years. And who knows who did before me.

How do you know if there is lead build up in the barrel? I'm guessing you can just see it?
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Old 06-03-2017, 07:43 PM
dfariswheel dfariswheel is offline
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Usually under a good light you can look into the rear of the barrel and see leading.
It's usually worse at the rear.

Best way to clean the barrel is to buy a Lewis Lead Remover Kit from Brownell's.
This uses a brass screen to pull leading out, and works far better then using an over-size bore brush.
The kit also includes a special cleaning tip that's uses to clean the forcing cone at the rear of the barrel.

To clean the chambers of lead, buy a bronze chamber brush from Brownell's.
This is not only a larger brush then a bore brush, it has extra stiff bristles.
Usually one or two passes will remove all leading from chambers.
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Old 06-05-2017, 11:29 PM
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Thank you. I picked up some scotch brite pads at Walmart, cuz they didn't have chor boy or brass wool. But that stuff is steel. Our little magnet would attach to it.

I didn't get a chance to go to a hardware store.

I had my 3 revolvers out today to clean them and I was looking real good at the barrels with one of those light gathering plastic thingy thing. That acts like a fiber optic sort of. A tube... Anyways... I can't really tell if any of my guns have lead in the barrel. There were a few spots on the colt where it looked a tiny bit pitted and not perfectly smooth. And maybe that's lead..... Then my model 19, in the grooves, there are tiny little grooves that are like perfectly in line with the rifling. Not sure if that's lead either. I need one of them brushes you are talking about to give it a few passes to be sure.
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Old 06-06-2017, 05:57 PM
dfariswheel dfariswheel is offline
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I trust you know that Scotchbrite pads are abrasive and will damage bores and chambers??

It's like using fine sand paper.

Use a Lewis Lead Remover Kit in the barrel, the forcing cone tip in the forcing cone, and a chamber brush in the chambers, NOT inside the barrel.

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Old 06-06-2017, 06:16 PM
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Yeah, that was my point about the magnet. I wasn't sure until I tested it with a magnet. I would rather try a cheaper option that the lewis tool. So I'll be hunting for chor boy or brass wool. Or a brass brush that you are talking about.

What does a leaded barrel look like? Is it that the cuts are just not as sharp looking and sort of wavy?
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Old 06-07-2017, 05:53 PM
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Usually leading looks like "chunky" deposits at the rifling at the rear of the barrel, and as build up on the forcing cone.

In the chambers it looks like a sort of crusty enlarged ring where the chambers taper down near the chamber mouths.
A clean chamber will show a smooth ring-like area where the chambering reamer cut the chambers.

The Scotchbrite I warned against are the green abrasive flat pads sold in grocery stores and in auto and hardware stores in other colors (grits).
These should never be used in a bore or chamber.

What you were looking for is 100% pure copper Chore Boy scrubbing pads.

Last edited by dfariswheel; 06-07-2017 at 05:55 PM.
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