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Old 05-06-2013, 12:56 PM
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Default M&P Shield and problems

I recently purchased a Shield (my first firearm), cleaned it, lubed it, and took it to the range to test it out. I seemed to have a problem when trying to get a round out of the chamber or putting one in, as it would get stuck (pushing one round out and loading another one). The guy at the shop said it was a limp wrist, but I wanted to know if anyone else has had any
problems with a new shield. I cleaned it and lubed it well again, and I plan on taking it to the range later this week to see what happens. Could it just be me and maybe im not racking the slide back hard enough or quick enough?
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Old 05-06-2013, 01:14 PM
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Could be riding the slide. The Shield has what I would call a strong spring because of the size of the gun. My wife can rack the 9c much easier than the Shield.

Are you having the issue just on the first round that you are trying to chamber or is this happening on multiple rounds while you are firing the gun? Based on your statement, I'm making the assumption that it is happening just when you are trying to manually cycle the gun. If this is true, hold the gun closer to you (still pointed in a safe direction), hold the slide with your non-dominant hand and push forward with your dominate hand. (Basically instead of using your weak hand to pull the slide back, you are using your strong hand to push the gun forward while the slide is being held in place.)
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Old 05-06-2013, 01:27 PM
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"Limp wristing" is a common phenomenon that equates to letting your body (typically the wrist joint) absorb too much of the recoil force for the pistol to adequately cycle. The cure is to hold the pistol firmly (firmly as in trying to crush it with your grip) and keep your arm locked (elbow locked, arm full extended, away from your body). You should feel muscle tension throughout the hand, wrist, forearm, and even a bit of tension into the shoulder joint when done correctly. This tension will allow the firearm to recoil as if in a vise, and will identify wether the gun is working correctly or not. As you experiment, you will change this grip/hold to suit your own comfort level, and the particular pistol's need. Another sanity check is to have another more experienced person fire the pistol.... some folks can "lay hands" on a pistol and cure its ills LOL....

As semi auto recoil operated pistols go, the smaller/lighter they are, the more "firm" grip they need. More precisely, they are less forgiving to poor/bad technique. A lot of people call the small single stack guns "expert guns" due to this phenomenon... Don't be fooled, anyone can use these firearms effectively, just as anyone can drive a high performance italian car effectively, it just may take a bit more practice.....

If I have mis read your post, and your problem is initially loading a round (racking the slide), try this.....
Hold the slide with only your non dominant hand (we will say left, as I am right handed, reverse if you are a lefty) in a "slingshot" grip, as if you are holding the leather pouch of a slingshot to fire a rock....
Use your right (dominant hand) to push the grip frame away from the left hand... the object is to push the gun away from the left hand, while trying to hold back with the left.... this will retract the slide to its maximum point and drop it (this should eliminate holding on to the slide while it is chambering a round, a big no-no).

The object behind loading a semiauto firearm is to allow the spring to reach maximum compression and fall with maximum energy transfer.... in other words, let the slide slam shut from as far back as you can pull it... if you keep your hand on the slide it will almost always fail to chamber a new round. If your grip needs work, buy some snap caps (dummy rounds) unload/clear/verify and try to chamber at home.... I WOULD NOT recommend using live rounds for this.... You can also practice with no rounds/magazines, but the feedback from the snap caps will verify that your practice is effective.....

Hope this helps! Jim
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Old 05-06-2013, 02:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmyers View Post
Could be riding the slide. The Shield has what I would call a strong spring because of the size of the gun. My wife can rack the 9c much easier than the Shield.

Are you having the issue just on the first round that you are trying to chamber or is this happening on multiple rounds while you are firing the gun? Based on your statement, I'm making the assumption that it is happening just when you are trying to manually cycle the gun. If this is true, hold the gun closer to you (still pointed in a safe direction), hold the slide with your non-dominant hand and push forward with your dominate hand. (Basically instead of using your weak hand to pull the slide back, you are using your strong hand to push the gun forward while the slide is being held in place.)
Yeah, just when I manually cycle it. Thanks for the tip, i'll give it a try.
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Old 05-06-2013, 03:02 PM
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[QUOTE=Autococker07;137206168]"Limp wristing" is a common phenomenon that equates to letting your body (typically the wrist joint) absorb too much of the recoil force for the pistol to adequately cycle. The cure is to hold the pistol firmly (firmly as in trying to crush it with your grip) and keep your arm locked (elbow locked, arm full extended, away from your body). You should feel muscle tension throughout the hand, wrist, forearm, and even a bit of tension into the shoulder joint when done correctly. This tension will allow the firearm to recoil as if in a vise, and will identify wether the gun is working correctly or not. As you experiment, you will change this grip/hold to suit your own comfort level, and the particular pistol's need. Another sanity check is to have another more experienced person fire the pistol.... some folks can "lay hands" on a pistol and cure its ills LOL....

As semi auto recoil operated pistols go, the smaller/lighter they are, the more "firm" grip they need. More precisely, they are less forgiving to poor/bad technique. A lot of people call the small single stack guns "expert guns" due to this phenomenon... Don't be fooled, anyone can use these firearms effectively, just as anyone can drive a high performance italian car effectively, it just may take a bit more practice.....

If I have mis read your post, and your problem is initially loading a round (racking the slide), try this.....
Hold the slide with only your non dominant hand (we will say left, as I am right handed, reverse if you are a lefty) in a "slingshot" grip, as if you are holding the leather pouch of a slingshot to fire a rock....
Use your right (dominant hand) to push the grip frame away from the left hand... the object is to push the gun away from the left hand, while trying to hold back with the left.... this will retract the slide to its maximum point and drop it (this should eliminate holding on to the slide while it is chambering a round, a big no-no).

The object behind loading a semiauto firearm is to allow the spring to reach maximum compression and fall with maximum energy transfer.... in other words, let the slide slam shut from as far back as you can pull it... if you keep your hand on the slide it will almost always fail to chamber a new round. If your grip needs work, buy some snap caps (dummy rounds) unload/clear/verify and try to chamber at home.... I WOULD NOT recommend using live rounds for this.... You can also practice with no rounds/magazines, but the feedback from the snap caps will verify that your practice is effective.....

Hope this helps! Jim[/QUOTE

Thanks man. I was doing it with live ammo at first but several people advised me not to. I'll go get some snap caps and give it a try that way and then go back to the range. All the info. is greatly appreciated guys.
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