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Old 05-01-2018, 12:10 AM
goodoboy goodoboy is offline
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Default Rifle Training for Deer Hunting

Hello,

I would like to prepare for my first deer hunt in about 1-2 years. I have never hunt before, but ready for the fun and challenge.

A few questions:

1. Can a newbie hunt deer in Texas with a AR-15? I have the .223/.556 caliber AR Sport II.

2. Do you recommend I start practicing with a bolt action rifle for my first hunt?

3. Where in Houston can I get good training with how to shoot accuracy at 50-300 yards for target practice?


Thank you kindly.
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Old 05-01-2018, 02:32 AM
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(1) a AR or any 223 is not a good deer caliber
(2) makes no difference about what action you use, only a adiquate
cartridge for the job.
(3) Choose the rifle and catridge for terrain you are going to hunt.
(4) Spend your practice shooting offhand once gun is sighted in.
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Old 05-01-2018, 05:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drm50 View Post
(1) a AR or any 223 is not a good deer caliber
(2) makes no difference about what action you use, only a adiquate
cartridge for the job.
(3) Choose the rifle and catridge for terrain you are going to hunt.
(4) Spend your practice shooting offhand once gun is sighted in.
I agree. Especially the caliber selection. I know, there are a lot of people that say the .223 is just fine. Well, personally, I think it is marginal at best and not enough for deer. Coyote's and ground hogs for the 223. For deer there are so many better choices. On the low end, 6mm Remington, 243 Winchester, 25-06, 270, 308, 30-06. And of course there are many more good choices in between the ones I have mentioned. The 7mm-08 comes to mind. The magnum class 7mm, 300 WM, and up IMO are overkill for close range shots. Yes, the 30-30 has probably killed more deer than any other cartridge, and it has probably accounted for more lost deer too.Just my .02
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Old 05-01-2018, 08:16 AM
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Unless they're fed supplemental proteins, as on a high-fenced ranch for hunting by (paying) clients, Texas whitetail deer aren't very big. Most bucks weigh on average 120-150 lbs. Does are usually around 90 lbs. That being said, shot placement is key, followed by using hunting ammo, rather than ball ammo.

I've killed a number of whitetail deer over the years, and my favorite rifle to use is my Savage 99 in .308 Winchester. That being said, the first deer I killed was a young buck with my Colt CRE-18 in 5.56mm. I made a high shoulder shot on him at 100 yds. with a 64 gr. Winchester JSP bullet, and he dropped like he was hit by the Hammer of Thor. I recovered most of the slug on the opposite side of its chest cavity where it had stopped against the skin (in other words, excellent penetration). Lots of people around here use the 5.56mm round to kill whitetail deer.

Unless you put a lot of accessories on your AR-style rifle, you have a lightweight, accurate, rifle with low recoil. I put together a PSA AR-15 in 6.8 SPC-II, which is the "next step up" from the 5.56mm to use as my MSR (Modern Sporting Rifle). I plan to use it this year on feral hogs and deer. An alternative would be to buy an upper in .300 Blackout or 7.62x39mm that would give you the ballistic equivalent of the .30-30 Winchester - which is a proven game getter.

To answer your questions:

1. Can a newbie hunt deer in Texas with a AR-15? I have the .223/.556 caliber AR Sport II.

Yes. There are no legal restrictions by TPWD (Texas Parks and Wildlife Department) that prevent hunters from taking game with the .223/5.56mm caliber. Be aware that a number of privately owned ranches that have paid hunts have a minimum caliber restriction of .243 Winchester.

2. Do you recommend I start practicing with a bolt action rifle for my first hunt?

I would practice with the rifle I plan to hunt with. Most deer around here (Central Texas) are taken within 100 yards or so. Every year I check the zero on my hunting rifles at the range before the season starts. I zero the rifle at 100 yards, and then make sure the scope is calibrated to shoot accurately up to 200 yards.

3. Where in Houston can I get good training with how to shoot accuracy at 50-300 yards for target practice?

I live about 4 hours away from Houston, so I have no idea what ranges are available in that area. I might suggest you find an experienced hunter to help guide and coach you. Yes, I know Al Gore invented the internet, and that there are a bunch of videos out there to watch, but I really think you need a guide/coach to help you out.

Good luck,

Dave
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Old 05-01-2018, 09:25 AM
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Agree with everything Dave said. Ammo development has come a long way too from when Grandpa said .223 was no good. A good hunting bullet, like Barnes TSX, will put down a deer effectively.

Funny that you hear that hogs are hard to kill, but we kill a bunch of 'em with AR-15s, yet that same caliber can't take a deer...
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Old 05-01-2018, 10:03 AM
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It really doesn't matter that much what you practice with as long as you practice. Shooting basics remain the same. Deer generally don't stand still and give you a chance for a second shot if you miss the first.

Try to find a gun club that shoots a reduced distance high power match. The guys and girls will be more than happy to help you with the different positions. Reduced matches can be less frustrating than a full 600 yard match.

Spend your time practicing mostly in the same way you will hunt. If you will be creeping through the brush, then practice mostly shooting offhand. If you will be hunting from a ground blind, then practice mostly from a sitting position.

Although deer are relatively easy to kill, it matters mostly where you hit them and less what you hit them with as long as you shoot a proper bullet. Although a .223 will kill them, a larger caliber will give you more leeway if the bullet placement is off.
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Old 05-01-2018, 10:27 AM
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One of the things missing, in my experience, from training for the hunt, is shooting at moving targets.
A GREAT method of doing this, which recently has made its way into every rifle training session for me, is using an RC (radio controlled) vehicle with a mylar balloon attached to its antenna.
My son drives the off-road RC machine with the inflated balloon attached to it down range and across the impact area, from one side to the other.
Shots on this balloon are very difficult initially, running the little RC car about 25 miles per hour across the lane gives you a very interesting look at an animal on the move.
Give this a try and see how your rifle shooting holds up (it will improve dramatically).
I have found .223/5.56 to be perfectly suited to small deer with 75 grain ammo. I have killed many with either an AR or a TC Contender in this caliber.
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Old 05-01-2018, 10:36 AM
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There are so many other choices that would do a much more effective job for you.

Here in Montana where Mule deer can get pretty large a favorite is a .308, 30-06, .270, .243 etc....the 6.5 Creedmore is gaining a lot of favor. All of which are readily available in just about any sporting goods store.

The .308 by any manufacturer is a great all-around cartridge and is capable of harvesting any game animal in the North American continent etc. and it is very accurate.

The Savage Axis is an incredible performer for not much money.


Randy

PS. Good training is to have a number of ballons on strings stapled to the backer board and shoot them from standing, kneeling, sitting or even prone. Try them at various distances....whatever your range will allow.

Last edited by growr; 05-01-2018 at 10:41 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 05-01-2018, 10:57 AM
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Here in Colorado, thankfully, the 223 is illegal for use on big game. Likewise, guns with a magazine capacity exceeding 5 rounds are illegal for big game.

I’ve killed deer in Colorado and in Texas.

I wouldn’t use anything smaller than a 243 for deer anywhere.

Practice with your rifle is imperative.

A great deal of deer hunting in Texas is done from a blind, which doesn’t involve offhand shooting. Instead, it usually involves shooting from a hybrid sitting position. Determine where and how you’ll be hunting to guide your practice.

If you aren’t hunting from a blind, developing skill in shooting from a kneeling position (and practicing quickly assuming a kneeling position) as well as offhand is important. Learning to properly use a sling is time well spent.

While you can successfully use an AR type rifle for deer hunting, the pistol grip and magazine extending beyond the gun’s action make the AR a clumsy choice for hunting particularly shooting from positions other than offhand.

Get a copy of Jeff Cooper’s book: The Art of the Rifle. It’s the best thing available on properly using a rifle. Avoid YouTube stuff.

If you’re going to use an AR, use a 5 round magazine, not a hi cap mag. You don’t need the weight of the extra ammo or the extra ammunition and you don’t want the extended magazine.

I don’t like deer rifles that weigh over 7 pounds including sights, ammo and sling. Often AR rifles are much heavier, especially with the gizmos folks add including large capacity magazines.

If you’re hunting from a blind, weight doesn’t matter but if you’re not it does.

I’ve noted that folks using AR type rifles sometimes aren’t very good with their first shot when hunting. It’s almost like they figure the first shot is just a warm up: they have lots more on hand. Your objective is to shoot once.

If the only rifle you have is a 223 in an AR platform, you can legally use it in Texas for deer hunting. It’s way down on my list of desirable rifles for big game hunting.

I’d pick a bolt action, a single shot or a lever action before I’d use an AR for big game hunting.

Last edited by Rpg; 05-01-2018 at 11:03 AM.
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Old 05-01-2018, 11:17 AM
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When I recommended that the OP seek out a club that shoots high power matches for pure marksmanship help, it was before I read his other post in this section. Mistakenly, I assumed that he knew the basics. After seeing his target in the other post, it is obvious he needs basic help. We aren't all born with the genes of John Wayne.

The OP should seek out a Project Appleseed clinic in his area. The clinic will improve his shooting much faster that practicing bad habits or asking for help at a high power match.

Project Appleseed | Project Appleseed
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Old 05-01-2018, 04:32 PM
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Goodoboy,

Go by Carter Country on IH 10 West. They should be able to answer any questions you have as to where to shoot.

Jim
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Old 05-01-2018, 07:19 PM
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If you are really going to "practice", then practice everything. Shooting at a target is only a small fraction of the skills needed. Practice how you are going to get into your stand, how you are going to sit down, how you are going to place your rifle while waiting, how you are going to raise your rifle to shoulder when you are ready to shoot. Determine how you are going to position yourself for each possible direction you may be taking a shot in. Practice getting out of your stand safely. Determine what areas you may have a shot, but may be taking a risk of the deer going to inaccessible area if it doesn't drop right away. These are not all inclusive, but hopefully you get the idea that there is more to think about than just pulling the trigger. I hope you find a good mentor, if you were here in TN, I'd be glad to help.

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Old 05-01-2018, 09:11 PM
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Make sure your rifle is "sighted in", and then go practice at ranges 50 to 100 yards. I use a 7mm Mauser cartridge and a 30-30 cartridge.
Good Luck in your pursuit.
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Old 05-02-2018, 12:41 AM
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Thank you all so much for your responses and advice.
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Old 05-02-2018, 05:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrchuck View Post
Make sure your rifle is "sighted in", and then go practice at ranges 50 to 100 yards. I use a 7mm Mauser cartridge and a 30-30 cartridge.
Good Luck in your pursuit.
7mm Mauser, excellent choice
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Old 05-02-2018, 11:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drm50 View Post
(4) Spend your practice shooting offhand once gun is sighted in.
Thank you Drm50,

What does shooting offhand means?
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Old 05-03-2018, 12:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrchuck View Post
Make sure your rifle is "sighted in", and then go practice at ranges 50 to 100 yards. I use a 7mm Mauser cartridge and a 30-30 cartridge.
Good Luck in your pursuit.
Thank you mrchuck,

What does sighted in mean?
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Old 05-03-2018, 12:13 AM
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Quote:
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Here in Colorado, thankfully, the 223 is illegal for use on big game. Likewise, guns with a magazine capacity exceeding 5 rounds are illegal for big game.

Iíve killed deer in Colorado and in Texas.

I wouldnít use anything smaller than a 243 for deer anywhere.

Practice with your rifle is imperative.

A great deal of deer hunting in Texas is done from a blind, which doesnít involve offhand shooting. Instead, it usually involves shooting from a hybrid sitting position. Determine where and how youíll be hunting to guide your practice.

If you arenít hunting from a blind, developing skill in shooting from a kneeling position (and practicing quickly assuming a kneeling position) as well as offhand is important. Learning to properly use a sling is time well spent.

While you can successfully use an AR type rifle for deer hunting, the pistol grip and magazine extending beyond the gunís action make the AR a clumsy choice for hunting particularly shooting from positions other than offhand.

Get a copy of Jeff Cooperís book: The Art of the Rifle. Itís the best thing available on properly using a rifle. Avoid YouTube stuff.

If youíre going to use an AR, use a 5 round magazine, not a hi cap mag. You donít need the weight of the extra ammo or the extra ammunition and you donít want the extended magazine.

I donít like deer rifles that weigh over 7 pounds including sights, ammo and sling. Often AR rifles are much heavier, especially with the gizmos folks add including large capacity magazines.

If youíre hunting from a blind, weight doesnít matter but if youíre not it does.

Iíve noted that folks using AR type rifles sometimes arenít very good with their first shot when hunting. Itís almost like they figure the first shot is just a warm up: they have lots more on hand. Your objective is to shoot once.

If the only rifle you have is a 223 in an AR platform, you can legally use it in Texas for deer hunting. Itís way down on my list of desirable rifles for big game hunting.

Iíd pick a bolt action, a single shot or a lever action before Iíd use an AR for big game hunting.
Thank you for the advice and book recommendation .
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Old 05-03-2018, 01:21 AM
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???????????
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Old 05-03-2018, 07:32 AM
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Like handgun training, it is best for the beginning rifle shooter to apprentice on a rifle that doesn't kill at both ends. Overcoming the effects of recoil takes time and practice. Even the ubiquitous .30-06, probably our most popular military/deer cartridge ever, tends to be a bit much for the beginner.

I too favor cartridges like the 6mm Remington, .243 Win, 7mm-08 Remington or some of the newer 6.5mms. For longer range with manageable recoil, its hard to beat the veteran .270 Win.

I've been in the woods where I've heard many incompetent shooters open up with an autoloader. If I were to be appointed the Czar of national hunting, I'd impose a rule that for your first three years of big game hunting, you are only permitted one cartridge in the rifle. That way, you quickly learn to make your shots count. Ultimately, using a rifle that's easy to hit with will yield more success in the field than a rifle that's easy to kill with.

Another mistake that new hunters make is to use a scope with too much magnification. Here in the east, the low end variables are popular for their much wider field of view. You don't need the Hubble telescope on your rifle.

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Old 05-03-2018, 08:01 AM
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To the OP - it is a good idea to think about and research matters before going hunting, as you have done. Getting instruction/training is also a great idea. If you have not already done so taking an NRA Hunter Safety course would be a first step, and undoubtedly if you want to pursue further courses or individual instruction someone at the course can steer you in the right direction. Learning basic terminology and firearms handling is a great idea.

Along these lines, reading up on hunting (since you have 1-2 years until you intend to go) would be a good idea. Here is a good start, written by a prominent and still-active hunter and firearms authority:




I'm sure you'll find more educational opportunities starting from here. Good luck!
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Old 05-03-2018, 08:46 AM
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Quote:
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Thank you mrchuck,

What does sighted in mean?
ĎSighted iní means that the gun shoots where the sights point.

Sights donít automatically point where the gun shoots: the sights often must be adjusted.
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Old 05-03-2018, 01:15 PM
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Quote:
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Thank you Drm50,

What does shooting offhand means?
Standing on your two feet shooting unsupported. I firmly believe that it should be used as a last resort. I know accomplished target shooters that have difficulty with that position.
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Old 05-03-2018, 03:47 PM
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If you don't have any friends/ acquaintances that hunt I would suggest joining a club that has an outdoor range with at least a 100 yd firing point. Once you start shooting there regularly you'll meet other like-minded individuals who can further your education on both shooting and hunting, and possibly a place to hunt as well!
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Old 05-03-2018, 04:30 PM
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I agree with what Homie says. However, shooting from the bench involves a nominal additional investment of equipment. You should be able to find used bench rest vices on eBay. Even the milder recoiling rifles tend to be a bit punishing on the bench as proper shooting technique has you leaning into the rifle and your body can't roll with the punch as it would firing from field positions (except prone). Pad your shoulder. Don't ruin the rifle by installing a recoil pad. Pads are generally not needed when hunting. Remington Shotsaver Bench Rest, for Rifles or Pistols, New, Free Shipping 689743592807 | eBay

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Old 05-04-2018, 09:44 AM
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Hi Goodoboy:

A few suggestions for you:

1. Steve Rinella, aka "The Meateater" is a successful hunter and writer. He also does podcasts and has a TV-show or two on hunting. Rinella is a good writer, and one of my favorite books is: "The Complete Guide to Hunting, Butchering, and Cooking Wild Game: Volume 1: Big Game"

The Complete Guide to Hunting, Butchering, and Cooking Wild Game: Volume 1: Big Game by Steven Rinella, Paperback | Barnes & Noble(R)

2. You might want to think about becoming a Hunter Safety Instructor:

Become an Instructor — Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

This will give you a chance to learn a lot about hunting, and hunting safety. Once you become an instructor, you will meet a lot of hunters who will be happy to share their tips and knowledge with you.

3. The TYHP (Texas Youth Hunter Program) is an educational program run by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD). TYHP is an outstanding program that introduces young people to hunting:

Texas Youth Hunting Program

They have a small, paid staff, but depend on volunteers to make the program run. If you have children, you should consider letting them join. If you don't you should think about offering your services as a volunteer. My son was a member for 2 years until he "aged out" at 18. We attended a number of hunts and always had a great time. On the hunts, you'll meet hunters and their families from all over the state. You'll also meet the landowners, who sponsor the hunts on their land, and you may receive invitations from them to come back and hunt with them.

4. Consider joining online hunting forums. One of my favorites is the Texas Bowhunter forum:

texasbowhunter.com

Don't worry if you're not a bowhunter - there are plenty of members who hunt with firearms only. It is a great forum with very knowledgeable and generous members - kind of like this forum. This can be a great resource for you - especially if you are just starting hunting.

Good luck,

Dave
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Old 05-06-2018, 10:16 PM
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Originally Posted by federali View Post
Another mistake that new hunters make is to use a scope with too much magnification. Here in the east, the low end variables are popular for their much wider field of view. You don't need the Hubble telescope on your rifle.
Thank you for the comment.

How do you make the decision on scope and magnification? Does this depends on the distance I plan to shoot?

THanks
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Old 05-06-2018, 10:21 PM
goodoboy goodoboy is offline
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Here in Colorado, thankfully, the 223 is illegal for use on big game. Likewise, guns with a magazine capacity exceeding 5 rounds are illegal for big game.

Iíve killed deer in Colorado and in Texas.

I wouldnít use anything smaller than a 243 for deer anywhere.

Practice with your rifle is imperative.

A great deal of deer hunting in Texas is done from a blind, which doesnít involve offhand shooting. Instead, it usually involves shooting from a hybrid sitting position. Determine where and how youíll be hunting to guide your practice.

If you arenít hunting from a blind, developing skill in shooting from a kneeling position (and practicing quickly assuming a kneeling position) as well as offhand is important. Learning to properly use a sling is time well spent.

While you can successfully use an AR type rifle for deer hunting, the pistol grip and magazine extending beyond the gunís action make the AR a clumsy choice for hunting particularly shooting from positions other than offhand.

Get a copy of Jeff Cooperís book: The Art of the Rifle. Itís the best thing available on properly using a rifle. Avoid YouTube stuff.

If youíre going to use an AR, use a 5 round magazine, not a hi cap mag. You donít need the weight of the extra ammo or the extra ammunition and you donít want the extended magazine.

I donít like deer rifles that weigh over 7 pounds including sights, ammo and sling. Often AR rifles are much heavier, especially with the gizmos folks add including large capacity magazines.

If youíre hunting from a blind, weight doesnít matter but if youíre not it does.

Iíve noted that folks using AR type rifles sometimes arenít very good with their first shot when hunting. Itís almost like they figure the first shot is just a warm up: they have lots more on hand. Your objective is to shoot once.

If the only rifle you have is a 223 in an AR platform, you can legally use it in Texas for deer hunting. Itís way down on my list of desirable rifles for big game hunting.

Iíd pick a bolt action, a single shot or a lever action before Iíd use an AR for big game hunting.
You are correct. I will proceed with researching, going hold a few bolt action rifles in gun store, and getting one with caliber greater then 243. I will not be hunting with a AR-15.
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Old 05-06-2018, 10:24 PM
goodoboy goodoboy is offline
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Originally Posted by murphydog View Post
To the OP - it is a good idea to think about and research matters before going hunting, as you have done. Getting instruction/training is also a great idea. If you have not already done so taking an NRA Hunter Safety course would be a first step, and undoubtedly if you want to pursue further courses or individual instruction someone at the course can steer you in the right direction. Learning basic terminology and firearms handling is a great idea.

Along these lines, reading up on hunting (since you have 1-2 years until you intend to go) would be a good idea. Here is a good start, written by a prominent and still-active hunter and firearms authority:

Shots at Big Game: Craig Boddington, Stuart Funk: 9780811717038: Amazon.com: Books

I'm sure you'll find more educational opportunities starting from here. Good luck!

Thank you for the good advice. I will write your advice on my to do list.
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Old 05-06-2018, 10:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Double-O-Dave View Post
Hi Goodoboy:

A few suggestions for you:

1. Steve Rinella, aka "The Meateater" is a successful hunter and writer. He also does podcasts and has a TV-show or two on hunting. Rinella is a good writer, and one of my favorite books is: "The Complete Guide to Hunting, Butchering, and Cooking Wild Game: Volume 1: Big Game"

The Complete Guide to Hunting, Butchering, and Cooking Wild Game: Volume 1: Big Game by Steven Rinella, Paperback | Barnes & Noble(R)

2. You might want to think about becoming a Hunter Safety Instructor:

Become an Instructor ó Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

This will give you a chance to learn a lot about hunting, and hunting safety. Once you become an instructor, you will meet a lot of hunters who will be happy to share their tips and knowledge with you.

3. The TYHP (Texas Youth Hunter Program) is an educational program run by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD). TYHP is an outstanding program that introduces young people to hunting:

Texas Youth Hunting Program

They have a small, paid staff, but depend on volunteers to make the program run. If you have children, you should consider letting them join. If you don't you should think about offering your services as a volunteer. My son was a member for 2 years until he "aged out" at 18. We attended a number of hunts and always had a great time. On the hunts, you'll meet hunters and their families from all over the state. You'll also meet the landowners, who sponsor the hunts on their land, and you may receive invitations from them to come back and hunt with them.

4. Consider joining online hunting forums. One of my favorites is the Texas Bowhunter forum:

texasbowhunter.com

Don't worry if you're not a bowhunter - there are plenty of members who hunt with firearms only. It is a great forum with very knowledgeable and generous members - kind of like this forum. This can be a great resource for you - especially if you are just starting hunting.

Good luck,

Dave
Thank you soo much Double-O-Dave;

For the great advice and references. I really appreciate it.
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Old 05-06-2018, 11:43 PM
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Rastoff Rastoff is offline
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Originally Posted by Double-O-Dave View Post
2. You might want to think about becoming a Hunter Safety Instructor:
Dave, are you serious? Have you been reading this thread?

The OP doesn't even know how to use iron sights or zero the sights or a scope. He's never been hunting and doesn't even know the first thing about hunting and the law where he is and you're suggesting he become an instructor on hunter safety? Isn't this putting the cart before the horse?
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Old 05-11-2018, 01:58 PM
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Originally Posted by goodoboy View Post
Thank you for the comment.



How do you make the decision on scope and magnification? Does this depends on the distance I plan to shoot?



THanks


The short answer is yes. If the majority of your expected shots are going to be fairly close, a 1-x scope will be more than adequate. Say woods hunting or in small open fields. If you are hunting in more open terrain, perhaps a 2-7x or 3-9.

Keep in mind that the 5.56/.223 cartridge is a intermediate cartridge, so generally speaking, anything beyond 600 yards is beyond the cartridge lethal effectiveness. Add on to that, that use for deer is marginal but possible, effective and humane shots are going to be less.

It appears from your later posts you are reconsidering using that cartridge but the general optic rules still apply. You donít want to go too powerful with the scope or you could miss out on a closer shot or lose the target because the field of view is too tight.


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Old 05-11-2018, 07:19 PM
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Originally Posted by MichiganScott View Post
Standing on your two feet shooting unsupported. I firmly believe that it should be used as a last resort. I know accomplished target shooters that have difficulty with that position.
There is two methods of getting your deer. Still hunting, sitting
on a stump or in a stand. This type of hunting allows the use
of supported positions for your shot. This is more or less Sniping.
If your rifle is zeroed there is no question you are going to hit
your deer. When you are "Deer Hunting" you are moving and
usually in thick cover. Deer come out of brush like rabbits. It's
only going to be in sight seconds and it ain't going to be standing
still. Bench shooters do have trouble with this " position", they
are shooting rested and are waiting to get a stationary shot on
the deer. Bench shooters would perish from starvation if they had
to off hand at a running deer. That is the difference of shooting
deer and hunting deer. Failure to learn to shoot standing on your
hind legs is like the checkouts at Wally World who couldn't make
change for a dollar without the digital read out on the register.
If you are going to hunt from a stand I guess your practice would
be judging the distances and learning to compensate for them.
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Old 05-11-2018, 08:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodoboy View Post
Thank you for the comment.

How do you make the decision on scope and magnification? Does this depends on the distance I plan to shoot?

THanks
Magnification depends on how far you intend to shoot to some extent.

In theory, a 600 yard shot would be best made with significant magnification. However, since most folks canít tell the difference between a deer and their mother in law at 250 yards let alone 600 yards, you arenít going to be shooting deer at 600 yards.

Iíve never needed magnification over 4X and most frequently use 2.5X. These are fixed power scopes. Iíve killed big game out to 300 yards or so but thatís not common.

Deer Iíve killed in Texas have all been at ranges less than 100 yards.
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Old 05-11-2018, 08:24 PM
MichiganScott MichiganScott is offline
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Originally Posted by Drm50 View Post
There is two methods of getting your deer. Still hunting, sitting
on a stump or in a stand. This type of hunting allows the use
of supported positions for your shot. This is more or less Sniping.
If your rifle is zeroed there is no question you are going to hit
your deer. When you are "Deer Hunting" you are moving and
usually in thick cover. Deer come out of brush like rabbits. It's
only going to be in sight seconds and it ain't going to be standing
still. Bench shooters do have trouble with this " position", they
are shooting rested and are waiting to get a stationary shot on
the deer. Bench shooters would perish from starvation if they had
to off hand at a running deer. That is the difference of shooting
deer and hunting deer. Failure to learn to shoot standing on your
hind legs is like the checkouts at Wally World who couldn't make
change for a dollar without the digital read out on the register.
If you are going to hunt from a stand I guess your practice would
be judging the distances and learning to compensate for them.
I've always done well shooting offhand at running deer. I just do it as a last resort. With over 50 seasons behind me and my health pretty much toast, I now resort to stand hunting, or sniping if you prefer. FWIW, with modern rangefinders, guessing distance is no longer necessary. Modern high velocity bottle necked cartridges, which you aren't allowed to use in Ohio, seldom make holdover necessary until much past 300 yards if sighted in properly anyway.
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Old 05-11-2018, 09:03 PM
Drm50 Drm50 is online now
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Originally Posted by MichiganScott View Post
I've always done well shooting offhand at running deer. I just do it as a last resort. With over 50 seasons behind me and my health pretty much toast, I now resort to stand hunting, or sniping if you prefer. FWIW, with modern rangefinders, guessing distance is no longer necessary. Modern high velocity bottle necked cartridges, which you aren't allowed to use in Ohio, seldom make holdover necessary until much past 300 yards if sighted in properly anyway.
I'm in same boat, shot my first over 50yrs ago in WVA. Since
have hunted other states and have owned about every cal you
can think off. Never had much use for LV rifles when out of State
Now have 45/70-375w-44mg to be legal.
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Old 05-14-2018, 12:30 AM
goodoboy goodoboy is offline
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Originally Posted by Drm50 View Post
Bench shooters would perish from starvation if they had
to off hand at a running deer. That is the difference of shooting
deer and hunting deer. Failure to learn to shoot standing on your
hind legs is like the checkouts at Wally World who couldn't make
change for a dollar without the digital read out on the register.
If you are going to hunt from a stand I guess your practice would
be judging the distances and learning to compensate for them.
Thank you for the comment and well received.

Are you stating deer hunters should learn to shoot standing up and not just sitting in a chair with a bench to shoot on?
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Old 05-14-2018, 11:15 AM
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Old 05-14-2018, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by goodoboy View Post
Thank you for the comment and well received.

Are you stating deer hunters should learn to shoot standing up and not just sitting in a chair with a bench to shoot on?
Depends on where and how you will be hunting. If hunting from an elevated blind overlooking a feed plot, then you would be shooting from a seated position with support, much like from the bench.

If you are doing stalking type hunting, you need to be able to shoot from field positions and know how to use a sling and/or shooting sticks to steady your rifle. Field positions meaning standing with no support, kneeling or sitting, and prone.
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Old 05-14-2018, 01:37 PM
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I usually like to zero in the same temperature and elevation that I will be hunting in.

Then I create a range card laminated And I also have wind effects up to 20mph on the range card.

It also helps to understand elevation and it’s effects on your bullets.

And of course practice. Offhand

Last edited by eb07; 05-14-2018 at 01:39 PM.
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Old 05-20-2018, 11:44 PM
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One more point that is VITAL for ethical, humane hunting: Understand your responsibility to the game to make a shot that will kill quickly and as painlessly as possible. That means passing up a shot if you have doubts about how effective it will be.
Reality being what it is, there will probably be misses and poor hits, but a true hunter strives to minimize them.
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Old 05-22-2018, 03:24 PM
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One more point that is VITAL for ethical, humane hunting: Understand your responsibility to the game to make a shot that will kill quickly and as painlessly as possible. That means passing up a shot if you have doubts about how effective it will be.
Reality being what it is, there will probably be misses and poor hits, but a true hunter strives to minimize them.
I know the OP said he wouldn't be using a .223 to hunt deer. This is the reason why. An accomplished shooter can bring down a deer with a .223 but someone new to shooting and hunting should choose a larger caliber. Personally I would not hunt with a .223 and I've been shooting for over 50 years.

The first thing a hunter should do is learn to shoot. Learning from an instructor is good but learning to shoot by thinking about what you're doing works too. Get a rifle, I'd start with a .22 because of the price of ammo, and learn to shoot it by the age old method we know as plinking. You will learn to shoot a lot of different ways plinking. Shoot moving targets (not live targets of course unless they're rats or something similar) and learn to shoot from different positions. I taught my kids to shoot using swinging targets. Side to side swinging targets that is. But a .22 target that swings back and forth can be useful too. It can teach you timing.

It takes a while. I learned by shooting at pop cans tossed into the air. If you know the trick you can hit them many times on one toss. Even better is to shoot clay pigeons with a shotgun. If you learn to do that you will be able to hit a running deer with a rifle.

Where I came from people learned to be accomplished shooters in all types of shooting. If you know someone who is like that you can learn a lot from them. We poked fun at each other if anyone dared to use a rest to shoot. Hunting doesn't allow for much shooting from a rest. It's possible to hunt deer with a rest since you'll likely be in a blind or a tree stand. But people also hunt while walking. That's the reason we all learned to shoot off hand. If you do that shooting from a rest is child's play. Sure it takes practice to get really good from a rest but you don't have to be perfect to hunt. Just good. It pays to be very good at shooting off hand. I wouldn't spend much of my time shooting from a rest at targets. Find a place where you can shoot different ways SAFELY. I grew up in a remote area in the mountains of eastern Kentucky. We could shoot in the air at pop cans with little concern about hitting anything as long as you knew where the few neighbors lived in range of a .22.

Once you learn to shoot then you should learn to hunt. Just shouldering your rifle without spooking your game is tricky. That's an area where instruction from people who have done it can help a lot.
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Old 05-30-2018, 05:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drm50 View Post
There is two methods of getting your deer. Still hunting, sitting
on a stump or in a stand. This type of hunting allows


the use
of supported positions for your shot. This is more or less Sniping.
If your rifle is zeroed there is no question you are going to hit
your deer. When you are "Deer Hunting" you are moving and
usually in thick cover. Deer come out of brush like rabbits. It's
only going to be in sight seconds and it ain't going to be standing
still. Bench shooters do have trouble with this " position", they
are shooting rested and are waiting to get a stationary shot on
the deer. Bench shooters would perish from starvation if they had
to off hand at a running deer. That is the difference of shooting
deer and hunting deer. Failure to learn to shoot standing on your
hind legs is like the checkouts at Wally World who couldn't make
change for a dollar without the digital read out on the register.
If you are going to hunt from a stand I guess your practice would
be judging the distances and learning to compensate for them.
don't.lisin to this guy that only jumping deer from their beds are true hunters sure he may get lucky once in a while with a hit in the *** that requires a follow-up shot but most likely he has tag soup every year, learn deer feeding and bedding habits pinch points and funnel's etc spend time in the area you will be hunting before hand,we have antler pt restrictions in my state how fast can you count pts on a running Buck? myself I'm primarily a bowhunter that doesn't use bait and I do ok

Last edited by Balright; 05-30-2018 at 06:30 PM.
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