Smith & Wesson Forum

Go Back   Smith & Wesson Forum > >


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-22-2011, 04:04 PM
fighter62 fighter62 is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 339
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Default 4006 value (quality)

I am looking at a 4006. This one is really LNIB with two magazines and paperwork. It is not a TSW. Has a round trigger guard, black trigger and hammer and Novak Sights.

THIS IS NOT A POLICE RETURN.

Typical for the 90's cardboard box.

I never had an S&W .40

What is fair price for this one?

How good are they ?

Thank You.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-22-2011, 04:29 PM
growr growr is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Montana
Posts: 2,743
Likes: 1,154
Liked 1,203 Times in 571 Posts
Default

As solid as it gets! Pricing is quite regional...get it and see why so many of us hold it in such high regard. Magazines, holsters etc are very easy to find and readily available.
Let us know how it turned out.....I have two of them!

Randy
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-22-2011, 04:52 PM
Double-O-Dave Double-O-Dave is offline
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 3,288
Likes: 169
Liked 2,076 Times in 872 Posts
Default

The 4006 is a good, but heavy pistol. I had one with the adjustable sights and protective wings on each side of them. Mine was not a police trade-in, and was in excellent condition with box, documents, tools, and both factory magazines, and I had a very difficult time finding a buyer at my price range. Most dealers and/or gunshop owners wouldn't offer me more than $150.00-$200.00. I finally traded it with some $ for a nice Model 13 with a 3.0 inch barrel that had been on my grail gun list for many years. I have arthritis in both hands, and find that the polymer Sigma (40F) and M&P 40c are actually gentler on the hands than the all steel 4006 (I think this is due to the polymer frame flexing under recoil and absorbing some of the shock). I recall mine being accurate and reliable, but it was designed as a duty gun for the police, so it isn't easy to conceal.

Best of luck,

Dave
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-22-2011, 05:24 PM
DCWilson's Avatar
DCWilson DCWilson is offline
SWCA Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 12,832
Likes: 3,423
Liked 4,860 Times in 1,745 Posts
Default

I recently acquired an adjustable-sight 4006 from early in the production run -- 1991 I think. I haven't had a chance to shoot it yet; I am mostly a revolver guy and have just been training myself in the safe handling of a semiauto until it feels like second nature. I have come to like its solidity and smooth action. It is a big steel brick that feels absolutely indestructible. The parts move with precision, and no matter how sloppily I manipulate the slide -- and I have been deliberately sloppy as I look for design or function problems -- I cannot make it misfeed a snap-cap or fail to eject one.

I bought a case of Fiocchi 170gr FMJ rounds to get to know the gun and am looking forward to the first range trip. I like the idea of the .40 S&W -- a great gap filler between 9mm and .45 ACP without all the slap and bang of the 10mm.

I suspect you will like the 4006 if you pick one up.

Can't tell you about the realistic used price because I got mine at a benefit auction. I knowingly paid way above probable retail in order to help out the beneficiary.
__________________
David Wilson
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-22-2011, 09:58 PM
Tracer_Bullet Tracer_Bullet is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: SE Michigan
Posts: 610
Likes: 9
Liked 141 Times in 63 Posts
Default

Mine are TSWs, very solid guns, accurate, reliable, a bit on the heavy side (around 38 ounces if I remember correctly). They are my favorite .40, but YMMV.
There was a 4006 for sale locally recently that was priced right around $450 with 2 mags, IIRC. It sold before I could get to the shop to look at it.
If you want it for the range or home defense I'd say you can't go wrong, but it would not be my first choice for a CCW.
__________________
Ban lunatics and criminals
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-22-2011, 10:09 PM
dirty gary's Avatar
dirty gary dirty gary is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: extreme So. Florida
Posts: 298
Likes: 112
Liked 80 Times in 37 Posts
Default

I picked up a TSW about 6 months ago for $300. Didn't know much about them but figured it was a deal. I've been pleasantly surprised at how well it shoots, it gets a lot of range time. If you're comfortable with the price you'll be OK, the 4006 is very comfortable - have 1 purchased new, love the Novaks.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-22-2011, 10:41 PM
novalty's Avatar
novalty novalty is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 13,570
Likes: 466
Liked 1,766 Times in 952 Posts
Default

As you described it, I would estimate it's value to be between $400 and $450. As mentioned before the 4006 is not a rare modeled gun, however, finding one LNIB would give it added value. They are a strong, reliable work horse, with combat accuracy and the added weight of the all stainless-steel will help in reducing some of that snap from 40 S&W recoil. As an added bonus, Crimson Trace grips are available for it.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-22-2011, 11:33 PM
dsk dsk is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 78
Likes: 3
Liked 15 Times in 9 Posts
Default

I've had one exactly like the one you're looking at for about two months (paid low 400s). It's my current home defense gun. It's definitely too heavy and chunky for concealed carry (unless you're a large person), but as a shooter it's great. As mentioned the weight helps to soak up .40 caliber recoil, and as an added bonus the heft of the pistol makes for a decent bludgeon if you run out of ammo.

One thing however, I tried a set of Hogue rubber grips on it, and it made the thing fatter than Rosie O'Donnell. Unless you have extra-large hands stay with the factory plastic grip.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-23-2011, 09:34 AM
novalty's Avatar
novalty novalty is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 13,570
Likes: 466
Liked 1,766 Times in 952 Posts
Default

Dsk, you reflect the same sentiments I have heard from almost everyone about the Hogue grips for the full-size 9mm & 40 S&W--they are just too thick. I love my Crimson Trace Grips on my 5906, they have finger grooves in the front, and are very close to the thickness of the factory grips.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-24-2011, 09:46 AM
FirebirdV8's Avatar
FirebirdV8 FirebirdV8 is online now
SWCA Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 1,402
Likes: 37
Liked 74 Times in 45 Posts
Default

I really like the 4006 and all of its brothers ( 4003, 4004, etc). The 40xx series he's proven to be reliable and accurate. As mentioned the 4006 is a bit on the heavy side but it isn't anything one can't get use to if you do want to carry it. Depending on where you live a LNIB example would run from $400 to $500.
__________________
J.D. Roy
Member #2308
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 12-24-2011, 10:17 AM
epj's Avatar
epj epj is online now
US Veteran
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Posts: 2,993
Likes: 55
Liked 901 Times in 417 Posts
Default

A little on the heavy side but no worse than a 1911 fs or a all steel commander.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12-24-2011, 10:55 AM
Mike, SC Hunter Mike, SC Hunter is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: In The Woods Of S.C.
Posts: 2,178
Likes: 606
Liked 1,027 Times in 520 Posts
Default

[QUOTE As mentioned the weight helps to soak up .40 caliber recoil, and as an added bonus the heft of the pistol makes for a decent bludgeon if you run out of ammo.

One thing however, I tried a set of Hogue rubber grips on it, and it made the thing fatter than Rosie O'Donnell. Unless you have extra-large hands stay with the factory plastic grip.[/QUOTE]

This man has a perfect way to describe this gun.
__________________
S&W Accumulator
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12-24-2011, 11:44 AM
heekma heekma is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hawkeye turned Longhorn
Posts: 152
Likes: 1
Liked 21 Times in 12 Posts
Default

I have extensive experience with the 9mm version, the 5906.

Accuracy is quite a bit better than "combat." It's not a match gun, but it's very accurate indeed.

It's never, for any reason malfunctioned through well over 3k rounds of ammo of various weight, shape and manufacture as well as being shot by novice shooters-prone to poor grip amd limpwristing while learning to shoot. The reliability has been nothing short of astounding.

It's extremely well-made with a beefy forged steel frame, slide and barrel. It's a bit heavier than polymer competitors, but if CC isn't in the cards, the added weight damps recoil a bit.

In the condition you describe, I'd jump at it for $350, still pay $400 with a smile, and go as high as $450+ if I was looking for, and found one, in the condition you described.

TL;DR: Great quality, accurate reliable gun, worth-to me-between $400-$450+.

Best,

Heekma
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
1911, 5906, ccw, commander, concealed, crimson, fiocchi, hogue, novak, polymer, sigma

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
M&P22 Quality mag318 Smith & Wesson M&P Pistols 18 09-23-2012 10:26 PM
CS quality vs. 3rd Gen? kbm6893 Smith & Wesson Semi-Auto Pistols 8 04-05-2011 05:02 AM
WTT 4006 + cash for 4006 TSW triggernick GUNS - For Sale or Trade 8 07-26-2009 01:07 PM
Quality at S&W Robert B S&W Revolvers: 1961 to 1980 9 01-20-2009 11:32 AM
New Model 41 Quality dapster Smith & Wesson Semi-Auto Pistols 8 11-05-2008 04:59 AM

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
smith-wessonforum.com tested by Norton Internet Security smith-wessonforum.com tested by McAfee Internet Security

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:20 PM.


S-W Forum, LLC 2000-2015
Smith-WessonForum.com is not affiliated with Smith & Wesson Holding Corporation (NASDAQ Global Select: SWHC)