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  #1  
Old 03-11-2011, 12:57 PM
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Default S&W Lever Action Rifle in 357 Mag

How about a high quality S&W lever action rifle chambered in 357 Magnum. Something along the lines of the Winchester Model 1892, with an 18 inch barrel. Takedown model would be the ticket. Made in USA please.

Would be the perfect companion to the 357 Magnum S&W revolver.

I bet they would line up to buy them.

Last edited by WiseOwl; 03-11-2011 at 06:24 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 03-11-2011, 05:25 PM
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You might be right. Some weeks ago I sold a "new in box" Winchester Model 94 chambered in 357 MAG (16" bbl with lanyard ring) on gunbroker. It was new in box and went for $850. Cost me $320 in 2006. Go figure.

Last edited by rbmac52; 03-11-2011 at 05:26 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 03-13-2011, 01:35 PM
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I doubt the word 'lever action rifle' has ever been mumbled in a S&W staff meeting. For a companion to my .357, I bought the same caliber Marlin 1894C. A nice little woods rifle.
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Old 03-14-2011, 05:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesArthur60 View Post
I doubt the word 'lever action rifle' has ever been mumbled in a S&W staff meeting. For a companion to my .357, I bought the same caliber Marlin 1894C. A nice little woods rifle.
Perhaps the Thompson Centerfire engineers would take on the challenge? They already did a nice bolt action so the lever action would be a nice addition to the family. That would keep it all in the family.

Now lets see.....the 686 on my hip and the model 92 on my shoulder, the mighty 357 locked and loaded in both....sounds like good combination..............just dreaming.........

btw can't find a Marlin 94c or a Winchester 92 chambered in 357 in stock anywhere. What does that tell you about how quickly they are snatched up by people who appreciate them?

Pretty please?

Last edited by WiseOwl; 03-14-2011 at 06:08 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 03-15-2011, 08:54 AM
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I'd rather have a pump action
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Old 03-15-2011, 12:42 PM
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Howdy

About 1854 there were these two gun designers. Their names were Horace Smith and Daniel Wesson. They formed a company to build rifles and pistols based on the earlier work of Hunt and Jennings in Norwich Connecticut. Eventually they moved the company to New Haven. They also hired a man as shop supervisor named Benjamin Tyler Henry. At about this same time a successful mens' clothing manufacturer named Oliver Winchester invested in the company and the name of the company was changed to the Volcanic Repeating Arms Company.

But the Volcanic design was never a financial success. The problem was the ammunition. It was under powdered. The ammo consisted of nothing more than a hollowed out bullet that contained a small charge of Black Powder. There was a foil covering and a priming mechanism at the base. But the powder charge was too small to develop enough energy to be a reliable man stopper.

Smith and Wesson eventually lost interest in the project and sold their interests to Winchester. Winchester directed Henry to redesign the ammunition, and he came up with a more substantial 44 caliber rimfire round. Then Winchester had Henry completely redesign the rifle for the more powerful round. The Henry Rifle of 1860 was the result. This was the first levergun of what became the extensive Winchester line up of rifles.

Smith and Wesson wound up in Springfield Massachusetts where they started up a new company producing revolvers in 1857. The rest is history.

As far as S&W producing a lever gun today, I can assure you they have no interest in it at all. Back in 2000 when they produced an updated version of the Schofield, they did not sell like hotcakes. S&W knows where their bread is buttered, and it is not in lever guns.

If you want a nice American made 357 Mag levergun, buy a Marlin.

I have included a photo of some Volcanic firearms. The two handguns and the small rifle near the bottom of the photo are Volcanics. All the other rifles are Henrys. I have handled an original Volcanic rifle, they were quite small.

P.S. The reason you can't find a Marlin is because they just relocated to the Remington factory in Illion NY. They are still firing up for full scale manufacturing. Give it a little bit of time and you will be able to find a Marlin.
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Old 03-15-2011, 02:53 PM
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.41 Mag lever gun would be nice Browning and Marlin did a few.
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Old 03-15-2011, 07:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Driftwood Johnson View Post
Howdy

About 1854 there were these two gun designers. Their names were Horace Smith and Daniel Wesson. They formed a company to build rifles and pistols based on the earlier work of Hunt and Jennings in Norwich Connecticut. Eventually they moved the company to New Haven. They also hired a man as shop supervisor named Benjamin Tyler Henry. At about this same time a successful mens' clothing manufacturer named Oliver Winchester invested in the company and the name of the company was changed to the Volcanic Repeating Arms Company.

But the Volcanic design was never a financial success. The problem was the ammunition. It was under powdered. The ammo consisted of nothing more than a hollowed out bullet that contained a small charge of Black Powder. There was a foil covering and a priming mechanism at the base. But the powder charge was too small to develop enough energy to be a reliable man stopper.

Smith and Wesson eventually lost interest in the project and sold their interests to Winchester. Winchester directed Henry to redesign the ammunition, and he came up with a more substantial 44 caliber rimfire round. Then Winchester had Henry completely redesign the rifle for the more powerful round. The Henry Rifle of 1860 was the result. This was the first levergun of what became the extensive Winchester line up of rifles.

Smith and Wesson wound up in Springfield Massachusetts where they started up a new company producing revolvers in 1857. The rest is history.

As far as S&W producing a lever gun today, I can assure you they have no interest in it at all. Back in 2000 when they produced an updated version of the Schofield, they did not sell like hotcakes. S&W knows where their bread is buttered, and it is not in lever guns.

If you want a nice American made 357 Mag levergun, buy a Marlin.

I have included a photo of some Volcanic firearms. The two handguns and the small rifle near the bottom of the photo are Volcanics. All the other rifles are Henrys. I have handled an original Volcanic rifle, they were quite small.

P.S. The reason you can't find a Marlin is because they just relocated to the Remington factory in Illion NY. They are still firing up for full scale manufacturing. Give it a little bit of time and you will be able to find a Marlin.
Thank you for sharing the history. It is amazing how close these great people worked in developing firearms. It is also remarkable how much of the gun manufacturing was concentrated in the north eatern US.
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Old 03-16-2011, 11:37 PM
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If you want a nice lever action rifle in .357 caliber that is readily available to go along with your S&W revolver, i recommend you consider the Henry Big Boy. Every piece of the rifle is made in the USA and the action is as smooth as silk. In my opinion alot smoother than the Marlin. I've had mine for a little more than two years and purchased it for about $600. No regrets
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Old 03-16-2011, 11:47 PM
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Quote:
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If you want a nice lever action rifle in .357 caliber that is readily available to go along with your S&W revolver, i recommend you consider the Henry Big Boy. Every piece of the rifle is made in the USA and the action is as smooth as silk. In my opinion alot smoother than the Marlin. I've had mine for a little more than two years and purchased it for about $600. No regrets
Let us not forget that Henry has been around since the 1860's,
I have never heard a complaint with their Lever-Action guns
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Old 03-17-2011, 11:13 AM
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"Let us not forget that Henry has been around since the 1860's,
I have never heard a complaint with their Lever-Action guns"

That is a misconception that the folks at Henry Repeating Arms would like you to believe. The company started up not too long ago and took the name 'Henry' simply because it was in public domain, and for name recognition. They have nothing to do with the original manufacturer of the Henry rifle. That company eventually became the Winchester Repeating Arms company, as I mentioned earlier.
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Old 03-17-2011, 01:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Driftwood Johnson View Post
"Let us not forget that Henry has been around since the 1860's,
I have never heard a complaint with their Lever-Action guns"

That is a misconception that the folks at Henry Repeating Arms would like you to believe. The company started up not too long ago and took the name 'Henry' simply because it was in public domain, and for name recognition. They have nothing to do with the original manufacturer of the Henry rifle. That company eventually became the Winchester Repeating Arms company, as I mentioned earlier.
Well, in that case you're gonna hafta be happy with a Taurus *** .357 lever action rifle. I'll try to be happy with a made in America gun
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Old 03-17-2011, 01:35 PM
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"Well, in that case you're gonna hafta be happy with a Taurus *** .357 lever action rifle. I'll try to be happy with a made in America gun"

No need for a Taurus, I have a nice Marlin Model 94 CS that I have always been very happy with. The Henry Repeating Arms Company will never see one red cent of my money specifically because of their purposefully deceptive advertising.
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Old 03-17-2011, 05:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Driftwood Johnson View Post
Howdy

About 1854 there were these two gun designers. Their names were Horace Smith and Daniel Wesson. They formed a company to build rifles and pistols based on the earlier work of Hunt and Jennings in Norwich Connecticut. Eventually they moved the company to New Haven. They also hired a man as shop supervisor named Benjamin Tyler Henry. At about this same time a successful mens' clothing manufacturer named Oliver Winchester invested in the company and the name of the company was changed to the Volcanic Repeating Arms Company.

But the Volcanic design was never a financial success. The problem was the ammunition. It was under powdered. The ammo consisted of nothing more than a hollowed out bullet that contained a small charge of Black Powder. There was a foil covering and a priming mechanism at the base. But the powder charge was too small to develop enough energy to be a reliable man stopper.

Smith and Wesson eventually lost interest in the project and sold their interests to Winchester. Winchester directed Henry to redesign the ammunition, and he came up with a more substantial 44 caliber rimfire round. Then Winchester had Henry completely redesign the rifle for the more powerful round. The Henry Rifle of 1860 was the result. This was the first levergun of what became the extensive Winchester line up of rifles.

Smith and Wesson wound up in Springfield Massachusetts where they started up a new company producing revolvers in 1857. The rest is history.

As far as S&W producing a lever gun today, I can assure you they have no interest in it at all. Back in 2000 when they produced an updated version of the Schofield, they did not sell like hotcakes. S&W knows where their bread is buttered, and it is not in lever guns.

If you want a nice American made 357 Mag levergun, buy a Marlin.

I have included a photo of some Volcanic firearms. The two handguns and the small rifle near the bottom of the photo are Volcanics. All the other rifles are Henrys. I have handled an original Volcanic rifle, they were quite small.

P.S. The reason you can't find a Marlin is because they just relocated to the Remington factory in Illion NY. They are still firing up for full scale manufacturing. Give it a little bit of time and you will be able to find a Marlin.
Would those be Henry's in the pic? That is quite a collection!
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Old 03-17-2011, 06:43 PM
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"I have included a photo of some Volcanic firearms. The two handguns and the small rifle near the bottom of the photo are Volcanics. All the other rifles are Henrys. I have handled an original Volcanic rifle, they were quite small."
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Old 03-29-2011, 09:35 PM
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I have a Puma / Rossi .357 lever gun in stainless steel and its a great shooter. Based on the 92 Winchester its about perfect as perfect gets.
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Old 07-31-2012, 04:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Driftwood Johnson View Post
"Let us not forget that Henry has been around since the 1860's,
I have never heard a complaint with their Lever-Action guns"

That is a misconception that the folks at Henry Repeating Arms would like you to believe. The company started up not too long ago and took the name 'Henry' simply because it was in public domain, and for name recognition. They have nothing to do with the original manufacturer of the Henry rifle. That company eventually became the Winchester Repeating Arms company, as I mentioned earlier.
May be true that Henry of modern day has no real lineage. but this doesn't detract any from what they are turning out.
I got one for my wife in 357. had I known it would sing like it does, I'd have left out that gift part of the purchase .. and Im not a lever gun kinda guy
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Old 07-31-2012, 04:18 PM
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I already have some Model 92 clones; this early Rossi without the "safety thingy" on top of the breech bolt is one of my favorites. The market for slick .357 lever guns is pretty much filled with John Browning's little gun today.

John

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Old 08-02-2012, 11:47 AM
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i have a winchester 92 in 357 20" barrel 10 +1 ...accurate and well balanced but not super smooth, maybe needs an action job?? i have used several uberti 73 s and they are nice ! i would recommend the uberti over all others, it is well represented at cas matches . but a smith levergun??why not if they make bicycles...
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357 magnum, 686, browning, remington, rimfire, rossi, s&w, schofield, springfield, takedown, taurus, thompson, winchester

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